What was your biggest fear when quitting?

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Feb 2004, 22:10 #31

Although fear is an important initial motivator it is not an enduring or sustaining motivation as your body is likely undergoing its most widespread healing ever. What will happen to any fears that we waited too long before quitting and the damage inflicted is beyond repair once we notice our senses of smell and taste recover, our morning cough or wheeze disappear and all of the sudden notice an up to 30% functional lung capacity? Imagine your primary quitting motivation disappearing before your very eyes.

If your list of reasons for quitting contain lots of fear factors do not fret but instead gradually recast each into sustainable positive motives able to build and grow instead of decay or disappear. Instead of fearing the worst, dream about being all you can be and reaching for your best. Transform fear of failing health into a dream of improving health. By doing so, each time we notice our healing it won't deprive us of a bit more of our core motivation but will instead bring a smile to our face and add purpose to this wonderful temporary journey of adjustment!

Keep the conscious rational mind's dreams louder than subconscious mind's irrational unfounded fears. Why fear arriving at a day where we never once think about wanting to use nicotine? Why fear a calm and quiet mind that's no longer filled with addiction's chatter? Why fear the prospect of again fully and comfortably engaging life as us? The key to staying on this side of the bars and keeping our now arrested dependency on the other is as simple as no nicotine today! The next few minutes are all that matter and each will be doable!

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 08 Mar 2009, 11:32, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Apr 2004, 00:48 #32

This thread kicks major nicotine butt !!! Thanks John !
1. My biggest fear was that the first three days would be horrible and that I would literally lose it because of all the daily stress in my life.
2. I overcame it by realizing that it wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. I had built it up in my head to be some horrible thing but at the end of the day (first 3 days actually lol) I realized on the whole that the withdrawals weren't as bad as all that (although I know all quits are different. I guess I just got lucky this time. but attitude helps).
3. How to fully enjoy the healing process while at the same time being prepared to downshift into ODAAT mode (or even one hour at a time, if I have to, during particularly rough moments).
Knowing through my own experience and the experience of those who have gone before that the bad moments DO indeed pass and you DO get back to where you want to be. That is, enjoying the healing and feeling the calm again.
YES, lurkers or newbies who may be reading this. I said CALM after only 2 weeks and a bit.
And I'm enjoying every single moment of it you can bet on it

Hammie

I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 4 Days, 9 hours, 53 minutes and 26 seconds (18 days). I have saved $55.23 by not smoking 368 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 6 hours and 40 minutes of my life.
Last edited by Hooked On Hammies on 07 Mar 2009, 15:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Apr 2004, 11:53 #33

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?
The first time I decided to quit I thought it would be easy, all I had to do was quit. I didn't know I was an addict to nicotine.

Well, I hated the way I felt, I was nervous, irritable, I felt like I was missing something every second and every breathe. After a few days I caved in for a fix, I thought I could just have one smoke... you know the rest of the story.

My biggest fear was the thought of having to go through withdrawal again.

2. How did you overcome it?
I knew that the anti-smoking ads, my friends, my family, my doctor, and even the warning on the package was right. I needed to quit.

"I love to smoke" I told my doctor, "I just hate what it represents, and that it has such a control on me. But I love it when I can lite up and take that drag, but I really really do hate it!" He laughed at me and then looked me in the eye and said "That is the addiction, and you are talking like a true addict. I am 12 years older than you and I will probably out live you."

I told him that I really do want to quit, and he suggested that I should join some support group, 'don't do it alone'. A couple of weeks later, I decided that it was time, I really want to end this addiction. I searched the internet and found this site called whyquit.com and FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow group.

Education, understanding, and support helped me to overcome my fear of quitting.

3. What did you learn in the process?
I have learned that quitting is doable. It was somewhat comforting just to know that I was nicotine free after 72 hours. I have learned that it helped to be in communication with others that are going through what I was going through. I have learned that education is necessary to really understand the effects of nicotine and what it means to be an addict. I have learned that I will always be an addict, and that one puff would cause me to lose my quit. I NEVER WANT TO GO THROUGH ANOTHER QUIT AGAIN... I have chosen to Never Take Another Puff -One Day at a Time.

Thanks for creating this safe place for me to come when I need education and support. And thanks to all you addicts.. you are the proof I needed.
Georja
5 weeks, 4 days, 23 hours, 57 minutes
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:01

18 Dec 2004, 23:55 #34

My biggest fear was that everyday for the rest of my life was gonna feel the way it felt the first few hours nicotine free.

Michele
11days
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Dec 2004, 00:12 #35

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?
  • Fear? Probably that I hadn't done it in time. Near the end of my smoking life, I would look at the cigarette while smoking it and keep thinking "What if I got cancer? Who would take care of my kids? "
2. How did you overcome it?
  • I quit! I still have that fear from time to time, but now I can say I did the best thing possible to reduce the likelihood of dying young. Geez I'm only 28..but when I look at stories like Noni.....that's pretty motivating.
3. What did you learn in the process?
  • What was the most shocking? That life goes on without smoking! It's hard to picture in the beginning but it's easier to live without them. I have more time, more money, more self-esteem, and a better attitude!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Dec 2004, 01:32 #36

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?
  • I was afraid the physical withdrawel would last several weeks or months and that I would not be able to deal with life without smoking, and would forever break down and cry when confronted by stressful situations. I was afraid of feeling 'lost'.
2. How did you overcome it?
  • I quit listening to other smokers and their doubts and fears about quitting smoking. I told myself I could do it, and so just quit on my own terms, blocking out the words of other smokers about how impossible it was to do. And because I was serious about wanting to quit, I searched the internet for some quit smoking tips. I found WhyQuit.com and became educated.
3. What did you learn in the process?
  • I too discovered life goes on without smoking! I learned the nicotine would be out of my body in only 72 hours!!!! I learned that I really was an addict and have to treat nicotine addiction seriously. I learned it really isn't as hard to quit as I thought and as other smokers always say. I also learned that having a positive attitude about not smoking makes a HUGE difference. I learned to have patience! What a virtue that is! The GREATEST thing I learned is to believe in myself!!! I also learned about who I am and discovered I am a much stronger person than I believed I was, and that I don't need any crutches - especially deadly ones!


Sandy - Free and Healing for Nine Months, Twenty Days, 10 Hours and 28 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 12 Days and 6 Hours, by avoiding the use of 3533 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,430.53.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Dec 2004, 01:43 #37

Oops! I almost forgot!
I ALSO learned that ...
I can NEVER take another puff!!!!!!
That's definitely huge for me because I was the queen of "I've been good and haven't smoked for a week now ... one puff won't hurt and I deserve it".
WRONG!!!!
It's so VERY easy for me now ... as long as I remember my commitment to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Sandy - 9 months free
Last edited by FearNothingDK GOLD on 07 Mar 2009, 15:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

20 Dec 2004, 19:26 #38

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

My biggest fear was that I had left it too late to avoid the horrible slow early death that my mother had after a lifetime of nicotine dependency. I was 54, about to become a grandmother and could no longer convince myself that I had plenty of time left.
2. How did you overcome it?

I am still trying to overcome it, but every day that goes by and every health improvement that I notice, I am a bit more confident (reduced blood pressure, feet that look flesh-coloured in winter and not changing between white, purple and bright red, ability to run - a little, but working on it - without becoming breathless etc).

3. What did you learn in the process?

I learned that maybe it's never too late, that I (and anyone) can increase my chances of living a longer healthier life by never taking another puff. After 9+ months it really seems doable.

Marion
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Dec 2004, 19:58 #39

Fear of Success. The fear of success may keep more people from starting a quit than the fear of failure. The reason people are so afraid of success is that they are often working with a false perception of what life will be without smoking. No matter how how many people tell them what life can be like without smoking, the perception an active smoker has is going to persist until the person quits smoking and sees for him or herself that life really does go on without smoking.

In clinic settings I always explain to the participants that the real goal of the clinic is to help the participants to get off for two weeks. Two weeks-that's it. In two weeks each clinic graduate will start to get a true sense of what it is like not to smoke. If the person decides that he or she hates not smoking, that life is unbearable, that he or she can no longer work, no longer carry on normal rational thoughts, no longer maintain a normal family existence, no longer have any fun or no longer able to meet life's ongoing demands-he or she will be fully capable of just going back to smoking. A person should never be afraid to quit because of the feeling that if he or she quits, he or she will not be able to get him or herself back to smoking again if the so chooses. The choice should always be based on whether the person wants to go back to full-fledged smoking or smoke nothing-but the choice for full fledged smoking exists for all ex-smokers.

On the other hand, if in the two weeks the person decides that he or she likes not smoking-maybe not smoking isn't perfect-but he or she is starting to get a flavor of where life is heading, how he or she is starting to face up to life demands and handling them reasonably well, maybe even a little better than he or she was just a few weeks earlier while still an active smoker, he or she has the choice of staying smoke free for another day.

People giving themselves the opportunity to see what not smoking is really like will overcome all these fears and generally truly appreciate the gift that they give themselves by being nicotine free. There are very few people who have ever left a clinic graduation went out and bought a carton or a case because they gave it the two weeks and decide that they really now want to become a full-fledged smoker again. Yes some people will throw away their quits days or weeks later, but it is not because they choose to relapse and are making a conscious decision to smoke until it kills them-it is because they get complacent and start to believe that they can somehow now control their quantity or duration of smoking. They almost inevitably regret this mistake and many will end up paying for it with their lives.

For as scary as quitting may be up front, the reality of what smoking can lead if understood is terrifying. A drag on a cigarette can end up costing a person tens of thousands of dollars, his or her independence, health and life. The reality of smoking does not improve with time, the fears intensify as symptoms develop and life gets a little more limited and the control nicotine exerts gets stronger and stronger.

You must quit smoking to see what life is really like as an ex-smoker and to some degree really recognize what life was like as a smoker. The longer you go without smoking and the more you understand, the less scary life will be and the more resolute you will continue to be to never take another puff!

Joel

From the new string Fear of Success. Original version from Monster under the bed .
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

20 Dec 2004, 23:55 #40

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

My biggest fear was that I would succeed and never be able to have another cigarette.

2. How did you overcome it?

After I learned not to look at it as NEVER having another cigarette, and to take it in smaller steps...getting through the hour, the day, the week, whatever, and put it in better perspective, it was much easier to face...the prospect of quitting, that is. (Thank you, by the way, Freedom!)

3. What did you learn in the process?

I learned that I am a nicotine addict (no, I did not understand this before September of this year), and that has changed the way that I look at the whole process. It's not about giving up a nasty habit, it's about overcoming and controlling an addiction. I have learned to see the positive side of not smoking instead of the easy way of staying an active addict. I have learned that I like being in control of my mind and body, and not allowing a substance to control it.

Sue
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:01

05 Jan 2005, 07:35 #41

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

My biggest fear is the how irritable I am at the moment. I have been very short with the people that mean the most to me.

2. How did you overcome it?

I am working on it now, I just need to take a deep breath before I say something in anger, that in retrospect, is completely out of context.

3. What did you learn in the process?

I have read alot of info on the board and realize that this is a sign of the strength of my addiction to nicotine. And my bodies response to the lack of the adrenaline rush that I am used to.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

20 Mar 2005, 05:59 #42

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

My biggest fear was that life would be completely unbearable without smoking.

2. How did you overcome it?

I quit, took one day at a time (sometimes one minute at a time) and realized that I could get up every day, live my life, go to sleep and wake up the next day. Quitting didn't kill me. As a matter of fact, honestly, it didn't even hurt. The fear was ALL in my head.

3. What did you learn in the process?

That apparently I do have willpower. That I was a slave to nicotine. That I am free now. And frankly, that's all that matters.

Wellzoegirl, 53 glorious days of my freedom
Last edited by WellZoegirl on 07 Mar 2009, 15:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Dec 2005, 03:22 #43

Lisa,
Wow, this post was very powerful for me! The three things you listed as your fears were the exact same issues I was dealing with. 90% of my friends smoke. Now that they have seen me doing well with my quit, they are starting to ask what motivated me and how I stay dedicated to it. Of course I tell them to go to whyquit.com to educate themselves.
I am still pretty early into my quit but with the support here and finally knowing that I am an addict and not a weak person that can not overcome a "habit" I feel that each day is doable. Thanks again to everyone here!
Kellie
I have now stopped smoking for 13 days, 2 hours, 51 minutes, 31 seconds. That translates into 327 cigarettes NOT smoked, for a savings of $65.4! I have increased my life expectancy by 1 days, 3 hours, 19 minutes, 53 seconds.
Last edited by KelliePfree1 on 07 Mar 2009, 15:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Dec 2005, 06:31 #44

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting? That I would never learn my (the) lesson-never take another puff. That I would continue to smoke, stop, smoke, stop, smoke, die.

2. How did you overcome it? I used my forces for good instead of evil.

3. What did you learn in the process? Never take another puff is the only absolute truth to remaining nicotine free.



Chevet' - Free and Healing for One Year, Three Months, Twenty Days, 20 Hours and 48 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 132 Days and 11 Hours, by avoiding the use of 9537 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $2,553.26.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Dec 2005, 10:57 #45

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

That I would fail...again. I couldn't bear the thought of disappointing my family and friends for the millionth time.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Dec 2005, 16:02 #46

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

Strange as this may sound I was afraid quitting smoking would change me in some negative way, I liked the way I was, I was content in my little world and did not want to fact the mind games that nicotine withdrawal can play on you, I did not want to deal with any discomfort at all. The fear of having thoughts of wanting a smoke go through my mind incessantly to much to bear.

2. How did you overcome it?

I decided that change was better than death. I was still afraid when I quit and I had to drag myself through each minute, hour, and day for the first 3 days. I read all the material on quitting here whyquit.com and put into action the tips I read, lots of water and juice, watch the blood sugar etc. It made a world of difference and my fears did not actually happen!

3. Don't decide in your mind how your quit is going to be before you quit. It will be quite different if you are educated. Quit and NTAP and you will be glad you did the best thing in the world for YOURSELF!
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:01

10 Dec 2005, 19:20 #47

What was my biggest fear when quitting:

That I would be able to quit for a little while but the "urge, crave, or trigger" or whatever name anyone wants to call it would be too strong for me to quit for a long period of time.

How did I overcome it:

In the begining by going a day at a time - getting days to add up ---I called it getting stubborn and saying stubborn - and telling myself well can not get worse - can only get better and easier.

What did I learn in the process:

Worth it to get stubborn - Now I am over a year quit and the "crave, urge, or trigger" or whatever name anyone calls it is almost non existant. Would say at this point maybe once a month get the thougt or remembering of smoking but is over in about 3 seconds.
Anyone thinking of quitting - I would say get stubborn - stay stubborn - - it is worth it and sooner than you think you will be able to look back and say - BEST THING I EVER DID.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

10 Dec 2005, 20:47 #48

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

I guess it was a combination of fear of failure and success, although I just had a look at my diary and saw that I didn't think that was the case in the beginning.

I was so afraid of relapsing again (I thought I had known before I started out on my journey that smoking is so much more than just a "habit" but I cannot have accepted the fact that I was / am a true addict as well.), losing my self-respect completely for relapsing again - but also afraid of forever having feelings of "wanting" or "needing" a cigarette again and of never being comfortable without my fix.

2. How did you overcome it?

Positive thinking, opposing all my junkie thoughts with the truth, laughing at myself and the triggers that have been coming my way, taking it one day, one hour and sometimes one minute at a time (they still all added up)

3. What did you learn in the process?

Life happens, it will always keep happening ... it can be sad, happy, frustrating, infuriating ... it doesn't care at all about me smoking or not. Nicotine cannot make anything better, it cannot fix anything - and while I enjoy my status as a recovering addict, I have learnt that I will always be just one puff away from crossing the fine dividing line to becoming a fully fledged, actively using addict again.



Gitte
379 days and a bit
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

22 Dec 2005, 04:39 #49

What was the biggest fear when quitting?:

Honestly... Fear kept me from quitting for the better part of the last 15 years. Mostly Fear about loosing something special. Loosing the Talks during "addiction induced" breaks. I was affraid of loosing my freedom.
When I actually quit, there was no Fear at all, not for one second!

2. How did you overcome it?

See above, I never overcame it until two weeks ago, by trusting into my strenght and will to live. I started reading about it by typing "Why Quit Smoking" into a Search Engine and landed here... I was looking for supportive material to tell me the good reasons for quitting... and found a bunch of fine people right here!

3. What did you learn in the process?

The Human Body is an amazing Machine, constantly working to keep itself running smooth. Your Heart is even more amazing. Your Mind wins any award possible for being able to scope with all the craves and physical dependency feelings. There is one thing I have learned as well: I learned to thank my Heart and Body for putting up with the S*** if have asked them to take for the last 15 years. I learned a few things more along the way: "The Tobacco Industry is Huge. They spend billions on convincing people that what they do is fine. They are killers. I learned that I can STOP Cold turkey, as I started Cold Turkey 15 Years ago. I never prepared my Body to smoke... why should I when I don't smoke anymore?
NEVER AGAIN!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Aug 2006, 04:27 #50

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Recommend Message 1 of 3 in Discussion
From: LizzyB (Original Message) Sent: 8/30/2006 12:16 PM
Fear is what kept us smoking for so long - fear of misery when we put them down forever. Overcoming our fear was essential to our quitting and staying quit.
Help a newbie (and an oldbie) by relating your inspirations - how did you conquor your fears???


A couple of thoughts from The Bard:



There is a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortunes; omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; and we must take the current when it serves, or lose our venture.



Our doubts are traitors,

And make us lose the good we oft might win,
By fearing to attempt.
Never give up!


Lizzy - Free and Healing for Two Months, Ten Days, 12 Hours and 45 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 8 Days and 16 Hours, by avoiding the use of 2504 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $439.42.

First Previous 2-3 of 3
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Message 2 of 3 in Discussion
From: Chipits Sent: 8/30/2006 1:00 PM
MY FEAR OF LIVING WITH OR DYING FROM A SMOKING-RELATED DISEASE WAS STRONGER THAN MY FEAR OF QUITTING.......THE EDUCATION AND TRUTH OF WHYQUIT.COM AND FREEDOM IS WHAT SHONE THE LIGHT TO EXPOSE THE FALLACIES OF QUITTING, THE REALITIES OF NOT QUITTING AND CONTINUES TO GIVE ME THE MOTIVATION TO DISCARD THIS MONSTER, COME WHAT MAY.......I KNOW I SHOULD HAVE DONE THIS YEARS SOONER. I NOW HAD NO REASON NOR EXCUSE LEFT TO JUSTIFY AN ADDICTION THAT STARTED TO KILL ME SOFTLY 39 YEARS AGO AND NOW WAS LITERALLY "TAKING MY BREATH AWAY" .......WE NEED TO BE HONEST WITH OURSELVES.......THEN JUST DO IT PEOPLE. ONLY YOU CAN GIVE THIS FREE GIFT TO YOURSELF AND YOUR LIFE IS SO WORTH IT.......
WENDY------FREE AND HEALING FOR 54 DAYS
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Recommend Message 3 of 3 in Discussion
From: realmarino Sent: 8/30/2006 4:25 PM
FEARS????
I thought I would get sick or have a stroke or something if I quit because I smoked for so long. How did I conquor that?? I found this site and read everything!!!! I educated myself and realized that quitting wasnt going to kill me. Smoking was!!!!
NTAP
I have been quit for 5 Months, 1 Week, 4 Days, 17 hours, 25 minutes and 11 seconds (164 days). I have saved $469.45 by not smoking 1,976 cigarettes. I have saved 6 Days, 20 hours and 40 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 3/18/2006 11:00 PM
Last edited by realmarino on 07 Mar 2009, 15:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

31 Aug 2006, 07:57 #51

From: CMondragon21170 Sent: 12/9/2005 4:31 PM
1. What was your biggest fear when quitting? That I would never learn my (the) lesson-never take another puff. That I would continue to smoke, stop, smoke, stop, smoke, die.

2. How did you overcome it? I used my forces for good instead of evil.

3. What did you learn in the process? CHOOSING TO NOT SMOKE is the only absolute truth to remaining nicotine free.



Chevet' - Free and Healing for One Year, Three Months, Twenty Days, 20 Hours and 48 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 132 Days and 11 Hours, by avoiding the use of 9537 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $2,553.26.


Chevet' - Free and Healing for Two Years, Ten Days, 23 Hours and 13 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 205 Days and 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 29639 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $7,639.96.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:25

01 Sep 2006, 13:48 #52

What was my biggest fear when quitting?

That it would hurt too much & I would give up. That I would end up on the floor, writhing in pain, crying & screaming & jibbering senselessly, & that I would torture myself like this for a couple of days, then give up.

How did I overcome it?

I watched someone I love die inch by inch & discovered that there are worse things in this world than withdraw. Chemo, for example. That's pretty bad. So is radiation. The only thing I can think of that's worse is what the cancer will do if you don't try to chemo & radiate it. So I decided that maybe I could do the withdraw thing after all. My perspective became altered.

What did I learn in the process?

I learned that if you don't have health insurance you will lose your house. I learned that most of the health care providers who work with the terminally ill are saints. I learned that south of the Mason-Dixon line, there are more smokers than tics on a redbone dog. Also more people hooked up to portable oxygen tanks. I learned that life is a blessing, and that maybe I shouldn't throw mine away.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

01 Sep 2006, 17:47 #53

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

I had a bunch of them. First, I thought I was already seriously ill and my health would not improve; I thought I was ready for the hospital. I did not think I could do this. I quit cold turkey using all the tools found here at whyquit.com and my lung capacity improved, my breathing cleared up greatly, my coughing is all but gone and my wife is supportive. Yesterday I started jogging and will be buying a USMC jogging outfit soon. I will proudly wear a patch that says NTAP and run my body to health and a successful quit. My fear is a silly one because I know who I am, once I get to feeling good again I GREATLY FEAR that I will fall to that first puff and the game will be over.

2. How did you overcome it?

I can only overcome it today, this particular minute, and moment by moment, day by day, facing everything that comes in the play of life just NOT TAKE THAT FIRST PUFF. So far after almost 17 days of freedom it's working and all is well. I am not saying that it is easy but it is simple. The temptation to smoke is no longer powerful and passes quickly. I am an analytical person, I say to myself; hmmm, smoke = death - not to smoke = life as healthy as it can be for me. The choice is simple, NTAP.

3. What did you learn in the process?

I have learned that I can do this. I do have the will power to quit smoking and I have learned that I am addicted to nicotine. This is a given, it will always be so but I do not have to succumb to it. I have learned that I need the support of my loved ones and friends and I have learned that this website is a Godsend to me. I sincerely give thanks for what Joel, John and the rest of the managers have created here. I also thank every person who writes into the site as well - as we grow together we learn together and we will stay clean together.

Joe Do - Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 21 Hours and 16 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 2 Days and 8 Hours, by avoiding the use of 675 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $168.98.
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Joined: 17 Jun 2006, 07:00

01 Sep 2006, 18:18 #54

1. What was your biggest fear when quitting?

That this quit was also, like the countless others that preceded it, doomed to the dustheap of failure



2. How did you overcome it?

By looking at my kids. My last quit was before my first child was born so quitting with kids around was a new thing for me. The innocence in my kids eyes was a powerful motivating factor and helped me try and overcome my pessimism.



3. What did you learn in the process?

That this quitting thing was doable. That if you set your mind to something, there are no limits to what you can achieve. That the human spirit is an awsome thing.

Robin - day "four score and one"
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

01 Sep 2006, 18:18 #55

The responses from Hope977 to these questions are powerful and thought provoking. Thank you for a different view of the same problem. Joe
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