What does my quit mean to me now ?

Lyverbyrd
Lyverbyrd

July 26th, 2003, 10:48 pm #31

Wow....Lotus. I so want to feel the way that you do!
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Robin Lady Di
Robin Lady Di

August 1st, 2003, 3:33 am #32

That's a good question because my 19 day old quit is the most important thing I have going on. It's so new to me that it's most often the subject of my thoughts. I know as time goes on my preocupation with quitting will be replaced by other realities but for now I am embracing my quit and giving it all the attention it needs. It's a new friend to me and we need to spend time getting used to each other. My quit is my lifeline to a better tomorrow. I be glad when we are better acquainted and can share some silent time together but for now we talk a lot. I have a lot to learn about dealing with life without using cigarettes as my crutch. The best thing about my quit is knowing I can stay quit.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 12th, 2003, 8:46 pm #33



Did nicotine's two-hour half-life inside our body ever allow us to really relax and really rest? Imagine the extremely joyous times in life never again being interrupted to tend to the needs of our addiction. The constant sense of calmness and comfort awaiting you is "you" and you'll never have to smoke to stay there!

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Joel
Joel

November 29th, 2003, 3:08 am #34

A new member was looking for some positve posts.
Last edited by Joel on November 5th, 2009, 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

January 8th, 2004, 8:03 am #35

The future is out there for you to grab.
Last edited by OBob Gold on November 5th, 2009, 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Hillbilly(Gold)

January 12th, 2004, 8:31 am #36

It's hard for me to believe that I am now where Marty was when he wrote this. Go back thru the various posts on this thread and do the math.
It was at my request that Marty wrote this, and it's as timely now as it was then. If you're reading this in your early days, believe it when I tell you that if you'll just give it time, things will get better. They did for me.
It's been so long for me that I have trouble remembering how hard it is for you at three days or three weeks. I tell you this to give you a reason to take heart--it does get better. Life does go on without cigarettes, I know because I've been there. I know, and I remember that I didn't believe the "oldies" when they told me this. I know, and I hope you believe. I hope you believe and give quitting a chance like I did.
I didn't believe, but I thought "What the heck, what have I got to lose, except a habit (addiction). And it worked. You don't have to believe, you just have to take things one day at a time. It's like Marty said, well go back and read it for yourself.
Just do it.
Dave
I don't smoke and I don't chew and I don't go with the girls that do. 1 Year 8 Months 3 Weeks 3 Days 22 Hours 27 Minutes 31 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 22187. Money saved: $2,773.47.
Last edited by Hillbilly(Gold) on November 5th, 2009, 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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twink1291
twink1291

January 12th, 2004, 9:40 am #37

Marty, I love this post and its very helpful, but it seems to contradict other things I 've read at this site that says once an addict, always an addict. I am really worried about relapsing this weekend where I will be with people who smoke. I've been smoke-free for 3 weeks.
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

January 12th, 2004, 9:54 am #38

"Marty, I love this post and its very helpful, but it seems to contradict other things I 've read at this site that says once an addict, always an addict. I am really worried about relapsing this weekend where I will be with people who smoke. I've been smoke-free for 3 weeks."
Perhaps your confusion is a result of your understanding about what it means to be an addict. Marty is an addict. Ditto me. Same for Dave and for you. But, what does that mean? Quite simply, it means that we are one puff away from being exactly where we were 5 minutes before we quit. Being an addict forever doesn't mean being miserable or constantly fearful. It means that, in order maintain your freedom from the substance to which we're addicted (nicotine in this case) we have to follow one simple rule: refraining from ever putting that substance into our bodies again.
Your fear of the upcoming weekend is a good thing. Unlike Marty, Dave or me, you're still very early in your quit, and you're just learning to deal with situations in which you used to smoke without using nicotine. It is likely that the weekend will present some challenges. You should spend significant time preparing for these challenges by understanding how to look at actively-using addicts, coming up with a plan to cope, and firming your resolve by revisiting your reasons for quitting. It is also vitally important that you remember that you will not relapse unless you take a puff. Sounds simple, but that's what it boils down to. You have it in your power to make the decision that is in your best interests when you're faced with it.
Here is some further reading that should be useful to you:
The Law of Addiction
I am an addict! Hooray!
One puff files
"Maybe I am different"
Being tempted watching others smoke
How do you handle being with smokers?
Another slant on how to watch people smoke

Bob (an addict who's been free for 2 years)
Last edited by OBob Gold on November 5th, 2009, 9:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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twink1291
twink1291

January 13th, 2004, 5:21 pm #39

Bob, I've read your reply several times and I think I am beginning to understand. You got exactly to the heart of my question. Thanks so much.

HK.
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

March 18th, 2004, 11:26 pm #40

Thanks for poppin this one up Parker! As it turns out, I am almost *twice* the quitter I was when I first responded to this thread (nearly 18 months free), and the best thing I can tell you all is that this comfort keeps getting better and better! I am beginning to truly feel in charge of ALL my actions (and Reactions for that matter), now that I am in control of my addiction to nicotine. Absolutely incredible. Thanks Marty for writin' this one in the first place...it's nice to look back and see how far we've come.

YQS~Lotus

Free and very gratefully healing for 1 Year, 5 Months, 3 Weeks, 1 Day, 20 hours, 21 minutes and 51 seconds (540 days). I have saved $4,056.35 by not smoking 16,225 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Month, 3 Weeks, 5 Days, 8 hours and 5 minutes of my life.
"I am convinced that life is 10% what happpens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you...we are in charge of our attitudes."
- Charles Swindoll
Last edited by IrishLotus GOLD on November 5th, 2009, 9:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Golddabler1
Golddabler1

March 18th, 2004, 11:45 pm #41

I can,t believe that i have never responded to this,as marty says that dreading feeling when going to bed,i have my first sore throat since i quit,it is a dry cough,but what a difference to go to bed and believe that this is what i have,a year ago i would have had a big dark shadow hanging over me,i would have went to bed wondering as i tried to doze off if i was suffering from something more serious.My quit means the world to me now,i see things very clearly as far as nicotine addiction is concerned,i am in a place where active addiction is a thousand miles away but ironically it is also just a puff away,thankfully that puff is no longer an option.
Rickdabler 1 year 1 week 2 days 12 hrs happily nicotine free.
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SweetLorraine (Gold)
SweetLorraine (Gold)

March 19th, 2004, 10:58 pm #42

Like Rick I can't believe I've never posted how much I love this post. Marty is, as always spot on.
Last edited by SweetLorraine (Gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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marty (gold)
marty (gold)

March 19th, 2004, 11:06 pm #43

Hey, I wrote that nearly two years ago
And you know what ? I still agree with myself
Still going stronger and stronger, calmer and easier, every month and year that rolls by.
And LOVING IT !!!!!!!!!!!
Marty
NOT A PUFF for three years, three months, two weeks : 21687 cigarettes not smoked, saving $7,590.75: Life saved: 10 weeks, 5 days
Last edited by marty (gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 11th, 2004, 10:40 am #44

If 200 butts are pictured above then piture another
110 ashtrays just like it that Marty didn't smoke
Last edited by John (Gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Hillbilly(Gold)

September 20th, 2004, 8:33 pm #45

If you're on Day Three and still hurting, this is what you have to look forward to.

Don't cheat yourself out of this kind of comfort.
Last edited by Hillbilly(Gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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tepake
tepake

December 4th, 2004, 1:58 pm #46

You 'oldies' do us 'newbies' a great service by bumping these posts to the top. It's comforting to know that a person like Marty, who's been quit for four or more years, has felt what we're feeling now and encouraging to realize (and believe) that someday we'll be feeling what they feel now.

And John, that ashtray looks just like the 'bucket 'o butts' I used to keep in the backyard and threw out on the second day of my quit. What fond memories that brings back of days standing outside in the rain while the rest of the family asked 'where's dad?'.

I'm imagining myself not smoking that many butts and I'm smiling.

Terry
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marty (gold)
marty (gold)

December 4th, 2004, 6:34 pm #47

Ha ! It's not often I see my name on a thread on the front page But as it's here, I'll just check in to confirm that I'm still loving it, still enjoying the huge benefits of not smoking
... and still hoping that all of you newer quitters get to enjoy it too !!!
Marty
NOT A PUFF FOR four years, 4 days : 26,364 cigarettes not smoked, saving £6,050.63. Life extended by: 13 weeks
Last edited by marty (gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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kindness68
kindness68

December 9th, 2004, 8:18 am #48

Hi Marty,

Thank you for this post. I look forward to being a non-smoker. Your post gives me the passion to keep moving in the direction I am.

pat

I have been quit for 1 Month, 2 Weeks, 6 Days, 20 hours, 18 minutes and 3 seconds (51 days). I have saved $324.03 by not smoking 1,296 cigarettes. I have saved 4 Days and 12 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 10/17/2004
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GoldenDivamom1972
GoldenDivamom1972

January 21st, 2005, 9:40 am #49

Thanks for bringing up this thread, and thanks for starting it in the first place, Marty. It gives me so much to look forward to. I'm excited!

Amy
Free and Healing for Seventeen Days, 14 Hours and 23 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 528 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $132.09.
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TiffQuit
TiffQuit

February 11th, 2005, 11:22 am #50

For Joe... Thought this might help answer your question.
yqf,
Tiffany
Last edited by TiffQuit on November 5th, 2009, 9:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

March 28th, 2005, 4:39 am #51

As Marty notes, freedom is an extremely bright spot in my life and a source of emotional nourishment during dusty days. It may at times be hard to see early on, but this is likely the most loving gift that you've ever given you. It's a gift worthy of holding close and protecting above all else. Millions upon millions of words here in Freedom's more than 263,000 archived member posts but just one guiding principle determining the outcome for all ... no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff! John (Gold x5)
Last edited by John (Gold) on November 5th, 2009, 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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OneMircl52
OneMircl52

March 28th, 2005, 10:54 pm #52

Thanks Marty, for such an awe-inspiring story of hope!!


My name is OneMircl52, and I am a nicotine addict.
I have stopped nicotine for 11 days, 9 hours, 14 minutes and 33 seconds (11 days).

I've not smoked 228 death sticks, and saved $45.56.
I've saved 18 hours and 58 minutes of my life.
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dsyf3r
dsyf3r

June 11th, 2005, 8:08 am #53

Wow, I just found this post, and all I can say is wow, like a good quit, this place (Freedom) just keeps getting better and better.
A post like this just strengthens my resolve, as now I have to get to where Marty was so I can feel it to (I never wanted to miss out on anything).
Last edited by dsyf3r on November 5th, 2009, 9:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Crystal View1.ffn
Crystal View1.ffn

June 11th, 2005, 9:45 am #54

Marty, your post "rocks"! You said "But being a quitter, now that's something different, that's exciting, that still gives me a buzz." This morning I was reflecting on my "quit reasons". I agree, being a quitter is still so special. I know in my heart that one major quit reason is one is how you described every night: "The thing I miss is the awful, sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach that I used to get every night when I went to bed, the dread of what I was doing to my body, and the feeling of self-disgust that I wasn't doing what I knew I should do about it. When I smoked, even the best of days was ruined."

Thanks, I will keep this one close at hand - "What does my quit mean to me now?" ... Freedom, which gives me a buzz

Thanks!

Katie - After 40 Years! Free and Healing for Seven Months, Twenty Three Days, 12 Hours and 40 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 13 Days and 23 Hours, by avoiding the use of 4021 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $812.06.
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Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

June 11th, 2005, 3:20 pm #55

Thanks, Steve, for putting this on the main board again. It also made me think of another one of Marty's really rocking posts:
Thank you, Marty, for all your posts that help all of us following in your footsteps to stay on the right path!
Gitte
197 days and a bit
Last edited by Starshinegrl Gold on November 5th, 2009, 9:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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