What did we love about smoking?

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Eileen D (GOLD)
Eileen D (GOLD)

August 11th, 2003, 12:20 pm #26

Unfortunatly for me I loved smoking and still miss it every day. I have long been over having cravings but junkie thoughts will be with me until I die. I am thankful every day for the education I've gotten here because all the knowledge is what keeps me from becoming a smoker again.

One year, three months, one week, two days, 19 hours, 42 minutes and 16 seconds. 14004 cigarettes not smoked, saving $2,100.69. Life saved: 6 weeks, 6 days, 15 hours, 0 minutes.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 11th, 2003, 7:54 pm #27

Love Eileen? I don't doubt or dispute your belief but do hope you'll explore the depths and foundations upon which its based. It's why this thread is here. Whether it's food, a great book or movie, or a love for another human, it's usually pretty easy to explain why we love something, and do so in detail. What is it that you loved about years of true chemical captivity, where your only alternative was chemical withdrawal and recovery?

Yes, we can throw back upon the glamours image that a lifetime of tobacco marketing conditioned each of us to accept and associate with our dependency. We may have loved unwrapping those pretty little boxes like some present to get to the highly dependable, manipulated and engineered smells, flavors and other chemical additives neatly aligned inside, including the most important of all - nicotine - that kept each of us on a never ending cycle of dopamine and adrenaline highs and depression and energy lows.

Not only did an endless cycle of adrenaline feedings whip every central nervous system neuron in our bodies like beating upon some tired horse, the dopamine aaah sensed with replenishment convinced us that the exhaustion and the depression of bottoming out was reason to go back for more.

If we believe we use to stimulate our body via adrenaline, there's scores of ways to release it which are non-addictive and come to an end when done, that range from anger to exercise. The same with elevated dopamine output that range and flow from a simple sense of accomplishment (that feeling that came when we colored between the lines) to the flood of dopamine released when gratifying sexual desires. If somehow related to organic depression our physician can even prescribe non-addictive depression medications that can provide constantly elevated dopamnen output should they determine medication indicated.


Even the tobacco companies say there is no longer any debate but that each and every puff damages the human body while gradually destroying its ability to transport life giving oxygen. If those who provided us with the colorful little packs and boxes are correct, what factors could possibly cause a drug addict's mind to define their own self-destruction as love?

Every fond memory created during years of feeding nicotine's two hour chemical half-life was true and real but the underlying action, event or image would have been just as real, exciting or memorable had we been nicotine-free and sucking-up life instead of smoke. To give ourselves as much of an opportunity as possible to continue enjoying life as long as possible there's only one rule - no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff!

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 4:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

August 11th, 2003, 8:14 pm #28

Hello Eileen:

I always as all of my clinic participants how many cigarettes they truly like in a given day. Most will come up with a few, the one they smoke when they wake up in the morning, the ones after meals, maybe a few on a work break, and a couple of others. They will come up with maybe five to seven cigarettes on average. Then I ask these same people how many cigarettes they smoke per day, and often the numbers are more like thirty to sixty. Then I point out that there is a mathematical problem here--that they smoke thirty to sixty and only truly enjoy five to seven. I ask these people where are all of the others? Many they smoke and don't even realize it, some are pretty miserable, and a few they actually hate as they are smoking. The problem is to smoke the ones they like they have to take all of these other cigarettes, and the fact is that all of them are killing them, even the good ones.

Sometimes though I will get people who smoke 40 cigarettes a day who says they love them all. To these people I have a question too. I ask them how much do they like smoking? Do they like smoking more than something like, um, I don't know, oh, maybe do you like smoking more than you like breathing? (I drag out my question a little longer than that.) If the answer to this is yes, well them smoking is an option. But of the answer is "no," or "I don't know," which is a legitimate answer in the first few days of a quit, they should give not smoking a try. Most will find out quickly that they truly didn't love smoking as much as they thought they did and will likely come to realize that even these die hard smokers who proclaimed to love smoking at one point realize that they love not smoking more.

All these people have to do to keep up their non-smoking life is to still remember what both ways of life are truly like. They need to remember that they now have the option of smoking nothing or smoking everything the way they used to. If they smoke the way they used to they must once again accept all of the problems smoking was posing at the end (health, smell, costs, social implications, chronic withdrawal, and others) and all of the long-term consequences that they were going to face down the road. As long as they remember accurately what both ways of life are truly like they will always remember why they first decided to and are still committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Eileen D (GOLD)
Eileen D (GOLD)

August 12th, 2003, 12:24 am #29

John and Joel I think the most important statement in my post was that the knowledge I received here is what keeps me a non smoker. I think smoking today would be a deadly mistake for me or anyone else but 42 years ago it was cool, not deadly .I still say I loved smoking I did not say I loved the thought of slowly killing myself because back then alot of knowledge was kept from us. and when the truth started coming out I was a full blown addict and no addict wants to believe that what they are doing is bad for them , I did not have FREEDOM to set me straight , sure I read the side of the pack but for most smokers it did't scare them. Then you come to FREEDOM and that is a wake up call that no smoker can dispute!!!!!!!!!! Keep up the good work
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 11th, 2003, 7:10 am #30

That First Cigarette Was Great!!!

Hey Joy, I just had to strike a half-life chord with your morning fix. As you know, nicotine's half-life in our blood was about two hours. If we slept for eight hours, then by morning our blood serum nicotine level was just 1/16th of what it was during peak periods each day. If we picture ourselves as a nicotine gas tank, our reserves had to have been down around our ankles by sunrise. Is it any wonder that those first few puffs each day were so darn memorable
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 4:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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CandidCandiSilver
CandidCandiSilver

November 11th, 2003, 8:28 am #31

Hmmmm . . . . . guess that is a rhetorical question. As I sit here with almost 19 days of freedom from nicotine, I honestly cannot think on one thing that I loved about smoking!! I had become a slave to my addiction. As long as I remember the guy up in the corner, I will Never Take Another Puff!!
Thanks John (and Joel) for all you do for us here at Freedom.
God Bless,
Candi
Free and Healing for Eighteen Days, 20 Hours and 48 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 7 Hours, by avoiding the use of 377 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $49.09.
Last edited by CandidCandiSilver on February 15th, 2009, 4:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Coolmare2green
Coolmare2green

November 12th, 2003, 4:55 am #32

I don't think i ever loved it or anything about it. it made me feel terrible the first time i administered it---- i was 14 and had such a profound response to it that i was completely incapacitated. tried it again at 17 while on amphetamines (everybody was saying how great it was ), and had no problem smoking all night long.after that night i was addicted, very quickly got up to a pack a day, and i truly don't remember loving or even liking it. i just hated the way i felt if i didn't use. the last 5yrs i spent being a closet smoker, and more than ever smoking was totally about that fix----- perhaps those who think they "loved" smoking would look a little closer they'd see that they're confusing a sense of relief from withdrawal with love---- a term better reserved for more worthy things like our families, our friends, and our FREEDOM.
Love and life to all of you---
Mary
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 1 Week 4 Days 12 Hours 24 Minutes 52 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 415. Money saved: $95.49.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 19th, 2003, 1:31 am #33

Dependability
Nicotine's or Yours?
Does the chemically captive mind spend each and every day feeling bad about that next mandatory feeding, or does it temporarily resign to the reality of confinement and do its very best to make a chemical prison cell look and feel like a real home? After years of learning to navigate the boundaries of our chemical confines is it possible to both keep the dream and flame of someday breaking free alive while at the same time growing more comfortable with the high degree of dependability provided by the fact that nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life is probably one of the most dependable events or circumstances in your life?

With such absolute chemical dependability, when we at last embark upon a meaningful quest for freedom from nicotine would it not be normal to feel like we were leaving something behind? Was there ever a single time that we smoked nicotine that it let us down and failed to immediately provide instant replenishment in again asserting command and control of over 200 of our body's neurochemicals, including affecting dopamine, adrenaline and select serotonin pathways?

Is it possible for a drug addict to both break free from their addiction while at the exact same time romanticizing its dependability? Is it possible to let go of something while still clinging tightly to it? If so, could such dependency devotion cause an addict to minimize or even ignore the amazing world of healing and freedom unfolding during their own self-recovery?

For years or even decades we each had no choice but to look at life through the bars of our cells. For just one brief moment try to forget about nicotine's dependability and reflect upon your own dependability in being able to accurately smell and taste, to breathe up to your body's potential, to deliver healthy oxygen levels to every living cell that is you, to try and live as much of your natural life expectancy as possible, and to experience reward, excitement and mood sensations un-desensitized by a brain trying to protect itself from a deadly natural pesticide.


For just the moment, try to fully embrace and sense the full glory reflected by the gradually emerging you. What would it be like to awaken each day to an expectation of fully engaging every aspect of it without once wanting for nicotine? Why romanticize having some chemical instead of having you?

Even if still clinging, to one degree or another, staying on this side of the bars and continuing this amazing journey in self re-discovery is as simple as ... no nicotine today! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 4:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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valeriescleanGOLD
valeriescleanGOLD

December 20th, 2003, 6:51 am #34

Wow, I came here to Freedom today to reaffirm my commitment to myself that I will never again take another puff and this thread jumped off the screen. I am coming up on a year of being clean and at times I feel so sad that I wasted 12 long years feeding my addiction. Its very upsetting to me still. The last four years I fed my addiction I wanted to quit EVERY SINGLE DAY but was afraid. I found Freedom and smoked away (gosh, can't even believe it..) while reading Joel's Library and December 31 2002 I smoked my last cigarette and didn't know it would be. You see, I woke up on January 1st and said, this is it, I will never smoke again- and that was it. I am so thankful for the education I recieved so freely here. And all the wonderful people that comprise this site. Freedom ROCKS! I never loved anything about smoking....I love life NOT SMOKING!

Valerie
11 Months, 2 Weeks and 4 Days...yippee!!!!
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grunger909
grunger909

December 20th, 2003, 9:15 am #35

hi valerie, what a lovely message, makes me so look forward to the future as opposed to looking back with some misguided sense of loss. You're right, we all need reminding of how we didn't enjoy smoking. Our brains just try to trick us now and again. Thanx again just what i needed to hear. Some celebration you'll have this new year. Be lucky.
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DlunyGOLD
DlunyGOLD

December 20th, 2003, 9:39 am #36

I guess that is one reason this quit has been so relatively easy for me so far--I really can't think of anything I LIKED about smoking at the end. In fact, I guess since I started back this last time (March 2002) I have really deep down wanted to quit but just could not "cut the cord" until I found whyquit.com and Freedom.

I did not like the expense, the planning to make sure I did not run out, the planning to make sure I always had enough money to smoke (even though sometimes it left me with almost no money for food--how crazy is that?), the having to leave in the middle of activities to go outside, the ostracism I was beginning to feel by society, the risks I was taking with my body, the cough and constant throat-clearing, the additional illnesses I suffered. I guess the one thing I might have enjoyed SLIGHTLY about smoking was that it took me away from my job several times a day for "smoke breaks" which I thought "cleared my head" and "calmed me down" but I now know I was just feeding an addiction!

Thank you Freedom and the Managers and the posters for being here and helping to give me the best Christmas present I could have ever given myself! A Smoke-Free life one day at a time!

Happy Holidays! yqb, David One month, one week, five days, 11 hours, 39 minutes and 19 seconds. 764 cigarettes not smoked, saving $57.36. Life saved: 2 days, 15 hours, 40 minutes.
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Angelicrosegonegreen1
Angelicrosegonegreen1

March 10th, 2004, 5:14 am #37

Well now - isnt that just a recipie gone bad! I know it is the fix factor but I enjoyed smoking about half of the time as well. I enjoyed the simple (habitual) act of pulling the smoke out of the pack and lighting it up. I enjoyed enjoying one over coffee. Isnt that why the natives shared their pipe? If we didnt feel the pleasure, there would be no way the cigarette companys could hold us, I dont think. Half of it is dealing with the habits associated with smoking that we have done for so many years of our lives. Like putting my hand in my coat pocket and playing with the lighter or pack of smokes. Having that little package there always gave me something to look forward to during the day. It is weird having it gone. I know it is all in my head but still..........
Kathleen - Free and Healing for Six Days, 16 Hours and 42 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 8 Hours, by avoiding the use of 100 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $44.21.
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Dandelion 317
Dandelion 317

March 10th, 2004, 5:40 am #38

I didn't enjoy a thing about smoking. From my first puff at age 17, to my last puff at age 24, I was simply administering an addictive substance to an addicted body. That rush, that ahhhhhh feeling, that "pleasure" was simply my brain saying Thanks for the fix, you addict! If only I had chosen to go for a run or do some yoga to get that same dopamine release! I can't go back in time, though, so I will not dwell on it. Today I can choose healthy alternatives to self-administering cancer and premature death, and I have this website to thank for that.
Dandy
59Days
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johnny L irish
johnny L irish

March 10th, 2004, 12:15 pm #39


I loved being a nicotine addict. I'd reinforce such foolishness almost 40 times a day. Boy, that love sure needed a lot of reinforcing.

Johnny

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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

March 10th, 2004, 1:10 pm #40

I enjoyed smoking! I enjoyed the relief of answering the compulsion to smoke. Over the years I have also enjoyed the following:
  • When someone gets off my foot, after they have stepped on it.
  • Warming up to room temperature after getting stuck with a car breakdown in an ice storm.
  • Putting my arm in a sling and taking muscle relaxants to ease the pain of torn ligaments when someone almost ripped my arm out of its socket.
  • Finally finishing vomitting after my stomach has ached tremendously from food poisoning.
Test... If each of these were analogies, which part of the equation would represent nicotine?

Answer... Nicotine was: the guy stepping on my foot; the freezing ice storm lowering my temperature; that nasty wench who dislocated my shoulder; and the food poisoning.

Trick question? Yes. Nicotine caused the pain and then we thought it was also the solution. How do the following solutions sound?
  • Ask that guy to step on your foot again every hour on the hour so that you can enjoy him getting off it repeatedly. For years even. I wonder how many bones there are in the foot to break? How many blood vessels, etc.?
  • Step out into the blizzard 20 times a day so you can stop convulsively shivering over and over again. It feels great to warm up! Maybe do this until you die of Hypothermia.
  • Line up a number of people to take turns yanking your arm out of its socket so that your ligaments tear again just as they're starting to heal. Eventually I bet you can destroy them beyond repair and damage the socket enough that your shoulder can't be relocated.
  • Put a little poison in every meal so that the relief is not in normal functioning but in expelling...
Wait a minute! Poison?! Ah. That's what we're talking about. Poison.

Forget the first three. Here, allow me to serve you the tastiest food on the planet. One catch though; every serving is poisoned. You'd think your tastebuds wouldn't find it tasty! Here's the rub... it's addictive.

No, it is not really tasty. We just thought it was.

~ Kay ~
Celebrating 2 Months, 16 Days, 18 Hours and 35 Minutes of Freedom.
Forsaking 1555 doses of poison has liberated $499.35 and 5 Days and 9 Hours of my life.
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

March 10th, 2004, 1:15 pm #41

The Law of Addiction
The administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on February 15th, 2009, 4:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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FearNothingDK GOLD
FearNothingDK GOLD

March 10th, 2004, 2:49 pm #42

Well ... I thought there were a few that I actually enjoyed ... but thinking back (and it hasn't been that long) ... even after the ones I thought I should enjoy ... I felt disappointed in the whole event and with myself for thinking I actually wanted it.

All I know is that I feel SOOOOO much better NOT smoking!!!!

And on a side note, I love feeling my heart beating at a nice, slow even rate. And I love that I have so much more energy throughout the day. And I love how I am finally sleeping better (first 72 hours were not good for sleeping, but it was only 3 nights) ... And I love that my throat isn't red and sore now. And I love that everything tastes so much better. And I love the feeling of calm. And I love how everything smells so good. And I love how I don't have that nagging little cough anymore. And I love how I have more time to do what I want and need to do without getting interrupted by the call of my addiction. And I love how my 12 year old son hugs me every evening and tells me how proud he is of me for quitting .......

And really all I can think about is all the hate I felt for my addiction.

I can't say there is anything I loved about it.

I hated it. I was only feeding an addiction. I didn't want to. I just did. Bad choice .... over and over and over and over again.

But I'm done. No more.

Sandy - Free and Healing for Eleven Days and 40 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 11 Hours, by avoiding the use of 132 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $52.96.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 12th, 2004, 1:27 am #43

A couple of our members have recently mentioned how they loved smoking. OBob responded to one and I want to put his (very slightly) edited response here.

Parker - 21 months



One last thing. Having watched people relapse at all stages of the game, looking back at smoking with rose colored glasses and challenging the Law of addiction, I feel that you might benefit from honestly evaluating how much you really "loved smoking." The fundamental questions: Did you love smoking? Or, did you hate not smoking. Did the joy of smoking come from something inherently wonderful about nicotine? Or, did it come from the relief of the agonizing withdrawal that nicotine put you through when you didn't smoke? Here is some reading from which I feel you might benefit:
"I Smoke Because I Like Smoking!"
You Smoke Because You're a Smoke-a-holic!
"Why I Continue to Smoke"

"I smoke because I like the flavor"
I am an addict! hooray!
What did you love about smoking?
Did you "make it this long?" Or, have you discovered true comfort?

It's an crucial distinction. If it's the former, there may be some things you need to confront. Just because you're 14 months past your last smoke doesn't mean you're in the clear. In fact, none of us are in the clear. We're all a single puff away from the cycle of withdrawal that compelled us to smoke for so many years.

To finally make it to the realm of real comfort there are certain things we need to confront... other things we need to accept, and finally still other things we need to embrace. That might sound like fluff, but it can mean the difference between a successful long-term quit, and either a lifelong struggle or a relapse back to slow-mo suicide.

So, honestly... do you see the last 14 months as something you've made it through? Or, have you discovered comfort without nicotine?
YQB,
Bob (2 years free)
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Jahunta
Jahunta

March 12th, 2004, 10:17 am #44

The first drag of a cigarette was the clincher for me. That's why NTAP is my mantra. It was the deepest drag of the whole cigarette. Forget if I was having a difficult day. I'd swear I could **** half of it down in one drag!! That whole cycle of addiciton stuff...it was why I smoked. Loved that first drag. I'll NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!

Quitting is Living!!

Juanita
3 weeks, 3 days, 23 hours, 14 minutes, 549 smokes NOT smoked, $123.53 saved.
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Stuball3D
Stuball3D

April 23rd, 2004, 12:58 pm #45

Everything I loved about smoking went away shortly after becoming a habitual smoker... Not that there was ever really anything to love, but there was one thing I really enjoyed: the cigarette high. That euphoric, dizzying, relaxing high that I got when I smoked. But something started happening; the high that used to come with every cigarette started going away. Every cigarette turned into every other cigarette. Then it only started happening about once a day; usually it was that first cigarette of day, and boy was it great. Then once a day quickly turned to once a month; I smoked more and more to try to make those rushes more frequent. Before I knew it I was no longer smoking to feel good. I was smoking so I wouldn't feel bad. I was addicted. I have to admit I am still addicted and I will forever be addicted. And what scares me is I know, yes, I know if I started up I'd feel it again. But now I know something else too: Any one cigarette I smoke for that buzz now, will bring back millions of cigarettes that will bring back nothing. Well... I guess I can't say nothing... They'll bring back the coughing; the horrible smell; a $1000+ a year habit; oh yeah, and one day they'd bring cancer along too. And all it takes is one.

I'm almost at two weeks now. Driving home for work tonight I was hit with a huge crave. Not for a smoke in the car, I was never a big fan of that, but for the after work smoke on the porch. To arrive at my sanctuary and smoke away the worries of the day. But I made it through, lurking through the forums, reading Joel's Library, I started writing this post as a form of therapy to get me through the crave. These days I'm catching glimpses of the light at the end of the tunnel, but it's still a ways off. Just gotta stay strong, I know I can do this.

Steven
- Free and Healing for Ten Days, 21 Hours and 45 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 229 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $36.89. Mmmmmm.... Feels Good.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 22nd, 2006, 10:25 pm #46

The Two Week Sample
As Joel reminds us, by the two week mark we have put ourself in position to accurately sample the free, still healing and emerging life that was not long ago buried beneath dependency, fear and despair. You've successfully navigated the up to three days needed to remove all nicotine from your bloodstream. You've now extinguished the vast majority of your regular subconscious nicotine feeding cues and may be nearing the point where you experience entire days without major challenge.

You are probably beginning to appreciate that each time you encounter an as yet un-reconditioned subconscious crave trigger that you are being rewarded upon completion with another piece of the puzzle, one more aspect of a life once dominated by chemical dependency upon smoking nicotine.

By now any initial fears that you were leaving a massive portion of "you" behind, that life without smoking nicotine was almost unimaginable, are being calmed by the honest realization that even the love in our heart, we get to bring it with us.

The excitement you're feeling now, about your freedom and healing, swim in it! Yes, there may be a few more remote triggers up ahead but look forward to each as a glorious moment of healing, not with dread or fear.

As for the conscious thoughts that may at times seem to fill your mind, don't run or try and hide from them. Most reflect the years of lies we fed and sold ourselves in order to look in the mirror each morning and not see a real drug addict looking back. Dig in, sort through the chatter and find the rationalization bantering about. Whether the rationalization, minimization or blame transference involves some aspect of like, stress, taste, love, boredom, oral fixation, flavor, or the addict's false illusion of "just one," grab hold of it and put it under honest light.

Our brain did not grow millions of extra nicotinic receptors (up-regulation) because of like or love. Our lungs did not grow taste buds inside them in order to support some bizzare taste rationalization or tobacco advertising.

Pleasure? Is that what we felt when we'd waited too long between fixes? Which cigarettes each day were truly pleasurable? What about all the others each day, the ones smoked while on auto pilot, that seemed to fill the ashtray and empty the pack without us hardly noticing it was happening? The all came from the exact same pack. Why were they not just as pleasurable?

Might nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life inside the human bloodstream and the fact that a bit of time had passed between nicotine feedings help explain those we thought "pleasurable? As Joel is fond of saying, it isn't that we liked smoking but that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke. All the neurochemicals that nicotine controlled via acetylcholine receptor sites already belonged to us. We left absolutely none behind.

Talking about flavor, now scores of neurochemicals are beginning to flow in response to life not in compliance with nicotine two-hour half-life mandatory feeding clock. When the moment calls for deep deep relaxation it will not be destroyed by a nicotine induced adrenaline rush. When it calls for genuine sadness or sorrow it will not be interrupted by a nicotine induced dopamine "aaaahhh" reward sensation.

The next time that joy fills your life for more than thirty consecutive minutes it will not be interrupted by a command to leave and find an acceptable place to service a mandatory chemical need. Take a swim in the gradually emerging you! You've already recovered many of the pieces of the puzzle and are now in a position to sample and notice what it can again be like being "you." Let recovery be your gift of the long forgotten "you" to you. Embrace it!

When you meet the ex-smoker who tells you that they still yearn to smoke nicotine it's because they took their smoking rationalizations with them. Few had the benefit that we've had to fully explore this most amazing chemical and its impact on our physical, subconscious and thinking minds.

Although it has been seven years since I was where you are, and more than four years since I've known anything you'd vaguely consider an urge or crave to smoke nicotine, we are at this moment both equals under the law of addiction. For no matter how many pieces of the puzzle we collect or how deep, calm or comfortable these minds become, our now arrested dependency has traveled with us. It paints a rather bright line in the sand, a line that does not discriminate.

The key to staying on this side of the line and keeping our now arrested dependency on the other is as simple as ... no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip, Patch, **** or Chew! Yes you can, yes you are! We're with you in spirit!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x7)
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 16th, 2006, 3:39 am #47




Like smoking?
Wouldn't an honest mind reflect on the entire cycle of nicotine emotions, from having waited too long between nicotine fixes ("WHERE ARE MY CIGARETTES !!! I NEED A CIGARETTE NOW!!!) to that magic second where more nicotine produced that "aaahhh" sensation. Was it that we liked smoking or that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke?
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 5:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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JewelieLG.ffn
JewelieLG.ffn

November 29th, 2006, 5:50 am #48

"Did we smoke for the aaahhh feeling or did we smoke so that we didn't have to sense what happened when we went to long without an aaahhh feeling? "
Was it the aaahhh feeling that kept us smoking for as long as we did? How valuable was that 'aaahhhh' feeling to us?
As an Ex-smoker, for me it is not worth the cost.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 8th, 2006, 1:48 am #49

Love? I think not.
JoeJFree-Gold 1 year 10 months 28 days
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Sharry
Sharry

December 18th, 2006, 12:41 am #50

It has been many years since I had the ahhhhhhhh feeling. It was more of the yuk feeling.

Nearly 2 weeks into my quit, and today, I think, for the first time actually wanted a puff and feel a bit down. But I won't be fooled by the memory of a long off cigarette that I enjoyed. That was a very long time ago.

Sharon
I have been quit for 1 Week, 6 Days, 9 hours, 47 minutes and 5 seconds (13 days). I have saved £40.22 by not smoking 201 cigarettes. I have saved 16 hours and 45 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 04/12/2006 07:54
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