What about PMS and quitting?

nicole77
nicole77

June 17th, 2003, 9:37 am #1

Hi!
Was wondering if any of the females out there have any tips on getting through PMT/S without any ciggarettes???? Help!

nic
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Changingmyname(SILVER )
Changingmyname(SILVER )

June 17th, 2003, 10:16 am #2

Hi, Nic...

I find the best way to combat PMS (and this is a continuing ordeal for me) is to make sure I exercise, avoid alchohol and caffeine after ovulation, make sure I take multi-vitamins, and to try to avoid blood sugar highs and lows. Quite honestly my PMS has always been tough to handle, even when I was a smoker. I did realize that smoking provided me with the excuse to go outside and take a break from life for a few minutes, so I make sure now to 'take 5' before letting myself become overwhelmed with emotion.

Also--when I first quit I noticed PMS was much worse. Now, it feels much better than it did when I was a smoker. I'm sure that has to do with all the positive changes I've made, both mentally and physically.

Theresa I have been Quit for: 9M 3W 1D 3h 23m 49s. I have NOT smoked 5922, for a savings of $2,221.06. Life Saved: 2W 6D 13h 30m.
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GeorgieGirl GOLD
GeorgieGirl GOLD

June 17th, 2003, 10:32 am #3

Hi Nicole! Hmmm ... Initially I did experience increased PMT/S because my anxiety levels were higher at the start of my Quit. Put hormones on top of that and aaaargh! I was a nightmare . Anyway - I did not really do anthing specific or take anything for it. I found that just going forward with my quit, eating well, sleeping well and exercising - basically balancing things out - helped alot! I am not a medical expert at all! Just from my experience it did get worse for me initially but as my Quit became more mature - my PMT/S settled also. Hope this helps??? It was a time thing for me .... apart from locking myself away for the PMT timeframe (haha) - as awful as it was, I just pushed though and came out the other side feelin so much better!

Georgia
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DubiouslyDos
DubiouslyDos

June 17th, 2003, 12:20 pm #4

I used just regular stress techniques - walking, deep breathing, even singing my favorite songs... in the end though, it leveled out when my body began adjusting back to life without nicotine.

Hang tough... this too shall pass!

Dos
I have been quit for 1 Year, 3 Weeks, 3 Days, 12 hours, 46 minutes and 58 seconds (389 days). I have saved $1,752.89 by not smoking 11,685 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Month, 1 Week, 2 Days, 13 hours and 45 minutes of my life.
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smokefreeJD Gold
smokefreeJD Gold

June 17th, 2003, 10:49 pm #5

Ahhh the first round of PMS after quitting. Hardly cause for relapse though, you've worked way too hard so far to blame it on hormones. One week give or take, just like your Glory Week. You know the techniques, just keep things in perspective. Once you get through that first round (at least for me) the next month was a cake walk.

Hang in there, the other solution is to explain to your loved ones that PMS led you to cancer. Sounds silly... but remember one = all. Personally I've suffered enough in my life each month as a result of it, I'm certainly not going to throw away my life (or my quit) because of it though.

Jill
Kicking Butt for 8 Months 1 Week 6 Days.
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StepperM
StepperM

June 17th, 2003, 11:23 pm #6

Hi Nic,
I have to fully agree with Theresa when I first quit it was worse but even now it is getting better and I'm only at 2 months 1 week of freedom from the horrible nicotine. Hang in there, it will get better.

Freegirl
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Toast (GOLD )
Toast (GOLD )

June 18th, 2003, 10:07 am #7

Hi Nic,

Another sympathetic voice here ...

Like Georgia, I had a spike in anxiety post-quit (am a diagnosed anxiety person, so it's not necessarily something everyone might look for). That, with my hormones cycling a bit more broadly, made my first few cycles interesting and sometimes uncomfortable times. Coping skills, as everyone has mentioned, helped tremendously. Time and healing and patience also have made a wonderful difference. This is likely temporary and like will smooth out over time for you. That said, please do not hesitate to consult with your MD if your symptoms cause you concern.

Hug you quit tight!

Melissa
24 months
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neddygirl1
neddygirl1

October 23rd, 2003, 2:38 pm #8

Tell you what - I am so glad this string is here! If a doctor could tell us perhaps what physical changes or differences (compared to when smoking) is happening that would really help?

I'm about to go through my first after quitting, and it's a little scary how moody I am! I cried yesterday after I couldn't open a jar. I'm 23. That's just silly. - boys have it easy.

I'm finding it harder to control my thoughts at this time too, but have found exercise to help with clearing my head a bit. Any other advice out there?

Go girls!
love net
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Joel
Joel

October 23rd, 2003, 3:00 pm #9

I wrote this a few weeks back for another member who was asking a similar question about PMS as it relates to quitting:

You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
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