Joel
Joel

February 6th, 2003, 9:11 am #26

Hello Anglea:

Don't be so sure that encouraging people to come back smoking is going to be doing the individuals you are trying to help a favor. You may in fact be undercutting their resolve and you will likely be undercutting the groups efforts. I only have a few minutes here. I am going to quickly go look for some posts that cover this issue. John may also chime in from his experiences in running clinics. I'll try to get back to this later tonight or tomorrow.

Joel
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Joel
Joel

February 6th, 2003, 9:20 am #27

Here are two post I just brought up Angela explaining the real value of a non-relapse policy for the benefit of a group:

Good news, our members don't relapse anymore
I Liked My Other Support Group More
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Joel
Joel

February 7th, 2003, 4:16 am #28

I just brought up a few posts for the benefit of a person I just had a phone conversation with. She was calling to help a family member to quit smoking. I suspected she was coming to look over Freedom as well as WhyQuit.com and wanted to make sure that she had quick access to the information that was pertinent to her situation.
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MareBear GOLD
MareBear GOLD

February 8th, 2003, 12:46 am #29

*sigh*
For Mr. MareBear
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Joel
Joel

March 9th, 2003, 11:22 pm #30

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

April 11th, 2003, 2:41 pm #31

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Joel
Joel

April 19th, 2003, 12:41 pm #32

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Joel
Joel

April 27th, 2003, 10:49 pm #33

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

May 17th, 2003, 7:49 pm #34

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MsArmstrongKIS
MsArmstrongKIS

May 18th, 2003, 2:00 am #35

When I was in the beginning of my quit, I told everyone that I was "trying" to quit. People congratulated me for "trying." It didn't take me long to realize that I may have been "trying" to recover in a healthy way, but I wasn't trying to quit at all. I quit.

"Do or do not, there is no try"--Yoda

I don't feel this way about everything in life--sometimes I think there is value to trying to do something, even if you fail. In fact, there are lots of things I can think of in which that is the healthiest attitude.
  • I'm trying to run a 7 minute mile. (Hey, if I fail and run a 10 minute mile, at least I was out there running and being healthy.)
  • I'm trying to make a decent souffle (they keep falling but I know I'll get it one of these days.)
  • I'm trying to get a short story published (I keep getting rejection notices but the important thing is to keep writing and not to give up.)
Loads of things are like this. But quitting smoking is not. The important thing is not to try to quit. The important thing is not to fail.

Alex

3 months 3 days nicotine free
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Joel
Joel

July 19th, 2003, 7:50 pm #36

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Joel
Joel

September 7th, 2003, 6:01 pm #37

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

October 31st, 2003, 9:55 pm #38

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

December 7th, 2003, 9:04 pm #39

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

December 31st, 2003, 11:03 pm #40

For our New Years Resolution readers: While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again.

So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Jery9282
Jery9282

January 1st, 2004, 1:43 am #41

Joel, may I add the quote from Yoda. "Try Not! Do or do not. There is no
try." I would add the only choice is DO IT NOW! Quiting is our choice. jery
quit 43 days

-----Original Message-----
From: Joel [mailto:mail@joelspitzer.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:04 AM
To: Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now
Subject: Re: Well, at least I attempted to quit.


-----------------------------------------------------------

New Message on Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now

-----------------------------------------------------------
From: Joel
Message 40 in Discussion

For our New Years Resolution readers:

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit
it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung
tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and
decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts
himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction,
he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the
process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and
physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction
requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again.

So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be
overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the
real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical
benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never
take another puff!

-----------------------------------------------------------

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 12th, 2004, 10:03 pm #42

  • Is there any guarantee that you'd ever come this far again?
  • Your brain was tuned and conditioned to function around nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life. What would be different next time?
  • How much more time do you have before risking being among the one-quarter of adult nicotine smokers who fail to live beyond middle-age, or the half for whom a birthday near their 60th is the last they'll ever see?
  • What chemical is worth surrenduring up to one-third of your functional lung capacity and a substantial portion of your ability to smell and taste?
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Joel
Joel

April 12th, 2004, 9:31 pm #43

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

May 25th, 2004, 9:49 am #44

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Joel
Joel

July 19th, 2004, 7:14 pm #45

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

August 20th, 2004, 7:46 pm #46

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

October 22nd, 2004, 7:47 pm #47

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

October 24th, 2004, 10:05 pm #48

For those "trying" to quit:

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

December 29th, 2004, 8:10 pm #49

While many people get excited about thinking of quitting or trying to quit it should be noted that these two states in themselves will not save lung tissue, your health or likely your life. Some smokers spend years and decades thinking about quitting or failing at quitting. When a person cuts himself or herself back to one a day in the intent to control the addiction, he or she is still no closer to quitting than the day he or she started the process. He or she is still in the grip of an active nicotine addiction and physiological need. Admitting the addiction and treating the addiction requires a 100% commitment to never put nicotine into one's body again. So don't be excited about having attempted to quit--be excited, be overjoyed, be proud and be happy that you have quit--and to keep all of the real psychological, social, economic and most important of all physical benefits, stay excited by the fact that you are totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 3rd, 2005, 4:30 am #50

The feel good quit?
So you can face yourself in the mirror during 2005?
So you can destroy yet another year's worth of air sacs?
So you can quiet family by saying, "see, I tried!"
It's hard work living and planning life from inside a pack.
What do you have to lose by seeing what it's like being "you?"
We're confident you'll discover that the real quitting took
place on the day nicotine took control.
We've built it and you've arrived.
Now it's your turn to go the distance!
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