WANTING vs. THINKING

Retraining the conscious mind
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Aug 2002, 10:06 #11

The next few minutes are doable for all !
Patience and Delay are our friends Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Sep 2002, 08:49 #12

If a newbie and still mastering the lessons here at Freedom you too can begin reaping the immediate benefits that flow Imageinto the subconscious mind from offering simple words of encouragement to other new members or from celebrating in as many of Freedom's parades as time allows. Celebration embraces recovery while destroying fears. Positive thinking is a powerful force for personal change, while constant negative thinking and endless fixation can elevate risk of relapse. Look for the good and savor it! This is your life and you're taking it back! Yes, you may find yourself bargaining, angry or at times, down and out but so did most of us. This is an adjustment period and you're doing fantastic! Go the distance. The next few minutes are doable by all!

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 20 Mar 2009, 19:18, edited 2 times in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Oct 2002, 19:02 #13

Have you ever looked closely at a flower bud and wished you could watch its beauty unfold right Imagethere before your eyes? At times this temporary journey of re-adjustment will almost seem to stand as still as that flower's bud but just like the bud its growing and unfolding a bit more with each passing hour.

Take a slow deep deep breath, smell your fingers, feel their warmth, feel the oil on the skin on your forehead, sense the evolving tastes in your mouth, and relish in the fact that every cell in your body is being fed more oxygen than it may have known in years. Unless the damage we've done is permanent, within just 90 days we could experience up to a 30% increase in overall lung function. As you spend time thinking about this journey today, I encourage you to devote some of it to the wonderful transformation that's happening right before your very eyes as the real you is gradually unfolding. Let go of the past and embrace coming home!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 20 Mar 2009, 19:25, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Mar 2003, 01:57 #14

Image
How many messages about smoking did you read in the past hour?
Be honest, how many times did you want to smoke?
Don't you find your answer amazing !
Last edited by John (Gold) on 20 Mar 2009, 19:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Toast (GOLD )
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2003, 02:13 #15

"Wanting never killed anyone and
Thinking is even less dangerous!
Today is entirely doable!"
-- His Zepness, John
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ComicForces GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

18 Apr 2003, 03:34 #16

It is interesting that this thread was brought up today. I do not think I have ever seen it, which of course surprises me, as I've been over this site a million times, it seems.

I was just thinking about this topic a few nights ago. I know that I often find myself stopping an activity and thinking - when I smoked I'd have a cigarette after this…. Or when I smoked I sat outside and saw my neighbor more… Or when I smoked I stayed up later talking on the phone… You know the drill. But what is sometimes annoying is that sometimes I do pause…and reminisce back to the smoking life. I think about how things were when I was doing that… And for a minute (IF that) I have to admit that I think fondly of smoking (*gasp* ~ big admission…). But then, like a good, dedicated little green Freedomite, I talk myself through why I quit smoking, what I have learned about my addiction, and why I like my life so much better now than I did then.

But I do THINK about it a fair amount of time. This does not IN ANY way, shape, or form mean that I am considering smoking in those moments, nor does it mean that I am fighting with all my might to withstand a crave. It's just that these thoughts come into my head…and I DO pause to acknowledge them…and I do reminisce…and I just wonder when I'll stop doing that. Because looking back at smoking…FONDLY, NO LESS… is not at all a pleasant feeling - if you can make any sense of that.

Don't know what I'm looking for here…Guess I just wanted to share how/why I can relate to the post. My quit is not in jeopardy, in fact, I am in love with my quit Image (truly), but hey, thoughts happen -- not too often, but they do happen.. It's not the greastest feeling but I'm assuming this too shall pass….

ComicForces
1 month, 3 weeks, 6 days
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smokefreeJD Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:06

18 Apr 2003, 08:21 #17

I understand what you're saying CF. It took me almost until my bronzing until I didn't think about smoking anymore. Then suddenly it was like I woke up one day and the thoughts were gone. But I'm kind of glad I had those thoughts longer than maybe someone else did because I got a lot more practice at defeating my inner junImagekie. I really learned the difference between thinking about smoking and wanting to smoke.

I'm also using this gif that John used earlier in the thread because it's so darned cute and it reminds me of the "Prouder than Anything" look my dog used to have whenever she got into the trash again. heheheheh


Jill


6 Months 1 Week 6 Days
Last edited by smokefreeJD Gold on 20 Mar 2009, 19:43, edited 1 time in total.
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RealNameNotAvailable
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:25

10 Oct 2003, 05:28 #18

Hi John,
Thanks for making the recovery process come alive so graphically. This makes me look forward to observing the changes with interest. During the day I am already finding myself spontaneously wanting to breathe in deeply and fill my lungs to capacity. It makes you feel as if you're getting taller, or maybe rising above the cloud layer in a plane ... I like the thought that change is occurring continuously.
Regards,
Stephanie (quit for 2 weeks 2 days)
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Oct 2003, 08:09 #19

Image
It was about where you are now, Stephanie, where I really started thinking that I could actually pull this off. If you're not there already, there will soon come a time where you'll really begin to believe that no disaster, crisis or circumstance could ever again compel you to put nicotine back into your body. You have every right to be very proud of you. You've come far and the best is yet to come - that relaxed sense of normal that was once "you!"
Last edited by John (Gold) on 20 Mar 2009, 19:46, edited 1 time in total.
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Mike Berg
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:12

30 Nov 2003, 22:29 #20

First time I've seen this one. Like to bring it up for the other newbies.Image

I still think about smoking a lot but there are very few times that I want to smoke. - and becoming fewer by the day

Mike



I have been quit for 1 Month, 2 Days, 12 hours and 29 minutes (33 days). I have saved $100.55 by not smoking 1,676 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days, 19 hours and 40 minutes of my life.
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