Waiting to Bottom Out

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Feb 2003, 23:14 #11

Image In memory of Aunt Bea's Friend.

In fact, some smokers never have the opportunity to bottom out. The first discernible symptom for these smokers is sudden death which is not the bottoming out experience the smoker was likely counting on.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Mar 2003, 21:24 #12

Image
We can hear coughing or wheezing but how much damage
has the effects of carbon monoxide and nicotine inflicted
upon your blood flow? Do you understand how smoking
destroys the body's blood flow?
Image

The damage inflicted by the four thousand chemicals present in each burning cigarette is real. These bodies were intended to last a lifetime but how many of our lung's 600 million alveoli (air sacs) have already been destroyed and to what degree has the blood carrying capacity of our vital arteries already been compromised? What's the real price of relapse?
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 May 2003, 09:16 #13

Australia - Sydney Morning Herald
Smokers pay heavy price
- but who picks up the bill?
By Julie Robotham Medical Writer
May 8, 2003
It provides relief from debilitating pain, coughing and breathlessness for patients in the months before they die from lung cancer. But the question is whether taxpayers should pay millions of dollars a year for the new drug that would help hundreds of Australians - almost all of them former or current smokers.
The drug, Iressa, which was approved for use in Australia by the Therapeutic Goods Administration last week, is one of a growing group of expensive new therapies that attack specific cancer cells, in contrast to regular chemotherapy which is toxic to cells of all types, but particularly to cancers.
At $4500 a month on a private script, almost no patients would be able to afford Iressa unless it was subsidised under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, said Michael Boyer, the head of medical oncology at the Sydney Cancer Centre, based at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.
The drug would not prolong life nor replace conventional chemotherapy, he said.
However, among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer - which accounts for 80 per cent of all lung cancers - almost half of the patients who had become resistant to chemotherapy found Iressa eased their symptoms substantially within 10 days. In 10 to 20 per cent of patients, the treatment shrank the lung tumour.
Iressa, made by the drugs giant AstraZeneca, was effective, on average, for seven to eight months before the patient became resistant to it.
"It's a drug that works," Associate Professor Boyer said.
Kwun Fong, a Brisbane thoracic physician and the chairman of the lung cancer group which exists within the Australian Lung Foundation, said there was "a lot of guilt among lung cancer patients" because of the smoking link.
AstraZeneca's medical director, Dr Glen Pater, estimated that the number of patients who would qualify to be put on Iressa would be "in the low hundreds", with a cost to the PBS of about $4 million a year.
The chairman of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee, Lloyd Sansom, said that quality of life was factored into decisions on which drugs to subsidise through the PBS, but for the costliest drugs this posed a dilemma.
"The so-called 'end-of-life' drugs are difficult to manage," Professor Sansom said.
"We're not going to cure things like cancer overnight . . . it is going to be a series of incremental gains, which are going to be very expensive.
"For some things they're just going to be too expensive."
Copyright © 2003 The Sydney Morning Herald
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Dec 2004, 06:03 #14

For Lee: The first discernible symptom for these smokers is sudden death which is not the bottoming out experience the smoker was likely counting on.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Jan 2005, 20:43 #15

In fact, some smokers never have the opportunity to bottom out. The first discernible symptom for these smokers is sudden death which is not the bottoming out experience the smoker was likely counting on.
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mauricesmom
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:43

25 Jan 2005, 21:52 #16

With a drug as powerful as nicotine we have to admit that it will never give you the option of telling you "now is the time to quit"..............It has to be up to you to take a hold of YOUR addiction and do something. When I read about people losing a loved one from smoke related deceases, such as cancer, and then at the funeral or cemetary those same people that are hurting from the lost of their loved one, have to light up and smoke a killer stick themselves. It sickens me and tells us all what a hold nicotine has on it's victims. Nothing should have that kind of hold on a person. We need to be free!

I've been quit for 24 days, 19 hours, 22 minutes and 12 seconds (25 days).
I've not smoked 620 death sticks, and saved $93.12.
I've saved 2 day(s), 4 hour(s) of my life.
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SusanColeenGreen
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:40

25 Jan 2005, 22:36 #17

Perfect example was my neighbor and friend Sondra Jackson, aged 37.

Heart stopped,in her front yard, dead on the scene. (this was 2 years ago)

Her husband was right there with her.
CPR, no effect.

Survived by two beautiful young daughters, one son in the armed forces, and one devestated husband.

Yes, she had been warned, she'd been feeling "weird", Doctor had told her "STOP smoking".

She was planning on quitting..........

Statistical Data for: SusanColeen
I have refrained from smoking for:One month, 5 hours, 30 minutes and 45 seconds.
I have spared my lungs from 1093 cigarettes, and
I pocketed $191.28 I would have spent to purchase my poison
Life saved: 3 days, 19 hours, 5 minutes.

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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Apr 2005, 10:44 #18

Smoking is a greater cause of death and disability than any single disease, says the World Health Organisation.
Saturday, 8 February, 2003, 15:52 GMT
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 May 2005, 19:02 #19

For those of you yet to be ex-smokers who may be reading here today or any day:

What are you waiting for? The time is now (actually it was each of those nights that you told yourself - I'll quit in the morning)! Tomorrow may never come. All we have is one day, today. Carpe Diem & NTAP!

joejFree - seizing each day the opportunity and making the conscious choice to Not Take Another Puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jun 2005, 19:36 #20

"The first discernible symptom for these smokers is sudden death which is not the bottoming out experience the smoker was likely counting on."
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