Brand New, Ex-Smoker

SamGee
SamGee

November 15th, 2010, 3:50 am #1

Hello Freedom, I'm Sam-

I have been off Nicotine for 3 whole weeks and I feel GREAT!


A little about me,
I was a smoker for six years from when I was 16 until 3 weeks ago and I remember very well how it all started. I was at a summer-school program in NYC
where ALL of my class-mates where smokers. I was offered a cig from one of my new friends and surely the need to feel accepted had tempted me to light up.
I definitely did not expect to be a chain smoker within the week, but guess what.. It happened. Since then I had struggled with the addiction, struggled with the pressure from friends and family to stop. People telling me how disgusting it was, I remember saying to myself "I'm a jazzy smoker and these folks just don't know what they're missing out on." 


For the longest time I truly thought smoking was classy. It's not.. AT ALL


Being short of breath at 22 from mild activity is not classy.


Smelling like an ash-tray is not classy.


Having to bolt out the door every half hour for a smoke is not classy.


When I decided to quit three weeks ago I bought some NRT patches as this was the method I used several months prior in a failed quit attempt.
That night as I was about to open the box and apply the first patch I discovered this website (Whyquit.com) and decided last minute to trash the patch and go cold turkey. I'm glad I did. 


Thank you WhyQuit. This has been the most WONDERFUL resource for me in my battle with Nicotine. I am finally beginning to feel like a healthy, independent, human being again!


NO MORE CIGARETTES!!!
NO MORE NICOTINE!!!


-SamGee 
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katsrule8gold
katsrule8gold

November 15th, 2010, 4:00 am #2

                                                                                 
Hiya Sam

You have entered the hallowed halls of the greatest cyber classroom known to man - and as you utilise the resources available here, you will do so for free, it really is all about the educaton - so read/listen and watch as much as you can, you have gone 3 weeks already, that is a major achievement, and congratulations on not applying a NRT as that unfortunately would have made you ineligible to join the forum, although everything else would have been available to you.
Study hard Sam the graduation ceremony is amazing, and the life benefits are beyond words.  Keep your journal, as here you will be given links and a record of your journey to look back on.
I am proud that at such a young age, you have given yourself this gift.

Suzie
I quit 25th September 2006
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paula anne
paula anne

November 15th, 2010, 4:14 am #3

Good job Samgee.  You have lasted longer than me so far -- I'm on day 6 and am very happy to be off nicotine for this long -- I never thought I could do it.  As each urge comes I just try to look at this website and read, write or listen to everything here.  I have friends I call to reassure me that smoking is not cool and it is in fact gross and disgusting not to mention the health aspects.  Congratulations to you and keep it up and never take another puff.
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JimH
JimH

November 24th, 2010, 1:29 pm #4

Congratulations on your quit, Sam.  Looks like you're Green by now!  Stay strong and get classy.  Every day without it is a victory when the plan is No Nicotine Today.

Jim - Free and Healing for Two Months, Thirty Days and 19 Hours  (Yep, just hours from Bronze!)
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aryeh36.FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow
aryeh36.FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow

November 25th, 2010, 5:45 pm #5

Congratulations Sam and Welcome.
You can and will make it.
You have come to the right place.
You will do it. We will all help.
Stick with  it. You are on your way.
Aryeh
quit date May 23, 2008
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SamGee
SamGee

December 1st, 2010, 5:59 am #6

Everyone for all of the support. 


I've been off cigarettes now for over five weeks and I'm loving it. I still think about smoking, but the cravings have been reduced from what seemed like an obsession in the first few days to nothing more than a thought. The cravings, while no longer compelling, are still present. 


I want to share an experience I had the other night. I met up at a local bar with some friends visiting from out of town. It was friday night, the bar was packed with people making it pretty warm inside. After a few drinks we stepped outside to get out of the heat for a moment, and with a few drinks in me a friend offered me a cigarette and i TOOK it. The cigarette was pinched between my index and middle finger ready to be smoked. I looked down at it and realized what I was about to do. Without thinking about how difficult quitting was, without thinking about the consequences of this deadly addiction, without thinking about my pack a day habit, without thinking about why I stopped in the first place, I TOOK the cigarette and had every intention of smoking it. I did not smoke that cigarette, but I want everyone to know how easy it was for me to forget about everything in that instant. I thank my better judgement for not smoking that cigarette for if I had I'm almost sure I'd be a full fledged smoker again feeling more horrible than the most guilty, miserable person alive. 


-Samgee 
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

December 1st, 2010, 1:32 pm #7

Well done, SamGee!!  It may have in part been recovery complacency but I suspect the greater force at work was the synergy of the alcohol, diminished inhibitions, the situation and an almost reflex type response after having handled thousands of cigarettes over six years of active dependency.  I was weeks into recovery and still from time to time found myself reaching for now empty pockets.  While as an addiction  recovery site we certainly don't advocate alcohol use (and definitely not for our many, many members who've arrested co-dependencies which include alcohol), recovery is about reclaiming life, just one activity at a time, even staying free after feeling the effects of too much drinking.

The manner in which we became hooked SamGee was similar.  I was 15 and smoked five cigarettes over three consecutive days in order to hopefully gain acceptance by young lady.  Then it happened.  She was gone, I was alone in my bedroom and my brain commanded me to find and smoke another.   Almost immediately, there I was, a daily smoker.

SamGee I'm sure you already know this so please forgive me for repeating it but our chemical dependency is as real and permanent as alcoholism.  A bit of patience, we can fully arrest it and live comfortably here on the free side of the bars for the balance of life, but we cannot kill or cure it.   Fully accepting my dependency is the greatest gift I've ever allowed myself for it greatly simplifies what I need to do to continue residing here on the free side of the bars.  In fact there was always only one rule ... no nicotine today, none!!

Be proud of yourself, SamGee, as relapse would have quickly had your brain's dopamine pathways again pounding out the false message that that next nicotine fix is as important as eating food.  As easy as it's now to see that active drug addiction was about living a lie, if again actively feeding, ignoring the wanting would again become extremely difficult.  In fact there is no guarantee that any of us could ever come this far again.  

No longer is each puff destroying more brain gray matter, white matter, alveoli (air sacs), blood vessel endothelium (the vessel lining) while increasing carcinogen exposure throughout the body.   The healing and risk reversal happening within is your gift to you, SamGee, including the ability to climb many flights of stairs without getting winded.   We sincerely hope you'll go the distance and allow yourself to feel the comfort and calm of residing here on Easy Street with us. 

I only wish I could have been you and mastered the Law of Addiction prior to the damage having permanently and significantly diminished this body's abililties.  Savor today's healing, SamGee, as this early gift of freedom is endowing you with increasing abilities that the smokers you'll see today cannot begin to appreciate.   Still just one rule ...none!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x11)
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Lauriemi
Lauriemi

December 1st, 2010, 2:18 pm #8

Excellent Samgee :))

Good for you!!
And Never take another Puff!!  I won't :))
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