Cant live with them, WILL live without them!

cliff
cliff

5:53 AM - Mar 20, 2009 #1

Hello fellow non smokers (it feels odd to call myself that). I am now on day six, nicotine free. I know right at this point that If I have a cigarette now, my chances of being a long term non smoker are gone. 42 years old .... smoked from 15 until 21.. Quit Cold turkey. Stayed off smokes until I got divorced at 34. Met a new partner at 35 and she was a smoker. The relationship had the usual ups and downs (mostly up) and some extremely stressful times. We would smoke to celebrate good times. (bad patten) We would smoke to deal with the bad times. (bad Patten) When we recently separated, I would smoke more to deal with it. I would find myself depressed with the amount of smokes I was having (as well as the split up), and was smoking more than double my previous amount. Once I woke up to how far I was heading downhill, It became an obvious decision... wake up or go downhill! Decided to cut down to less than 10 a day... 2 Weeks later I realised I was punishing myself, and the only option was to Quit. I have a lot of resolve, and after 6 days my body is giving me positive feedback at last ! I dont think I realised how poor my health and energy actually was. Back to the quit. Day three was invited to drinks at a friends who was celebrating a new baby.... Said no to the offered cigars, and then watched these crazy (non smokers) smoke.... The cravings seem to be lower, but the habit smokes are the difficult ones to deal with. It is amazing at what little things I did every day, were accomapanied by a cigarette. New pattens emerging are going for a walk, cooking more, and reading about not smoking. My ex partner is impressed with my quitting, and said she would quit when she is no longer stressed. Like most adults these days our live will never be stress free.... And smokes dont help. Not sure where the next weeks are heading, but hopefully easier! Day 6 Cliff
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katsrule8gold
katsrule8gold

8:47 AM - Mar 20, 2009 #2


You know what - yes you can live without them - I am proof as with everyone else here - we have gone cold turkey, we are stronger, more educated...............we are doing this and will continue to do this............all we have to do is understand and educate ourselves about how we became dependant on something that will kill us..........
Congratulations on taking control of your life....stand tall my friend 'cause you can and will do this - keep reading at
www.whyquit.com
learning is what it is all about..

Suzie
2+ years
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Joe J free
Joe J free

11:38 AM - Mar 20, 2009 #3

Welcome back to the true you Cliff. Education about our shared addiction is the key to living free of nicotine. There are good logical reasons you had to smoke because of all your stress. Take time to learn Why do we smoke. We smoked because we're smoke-a-holics! You'll never view the activity of ingesting nicotine through inhalation of tobacco smoke or absorbing the juice through mucous membranes or any other nicotine delivery system its purveyors have devised. A good description of the recovery process we work through is captured in the article The forgotten "You". The relapse of a "social smoker" might prove to be an interesting read as well. I have a few 'social smokers' in my group of neighborhood friends. Each of them is more hooked than they let on. There are very very few true social smokers. There are lots of this version of addict - The closet smoker. Make no mistake (and I believe you recognize the difference already) you and I and all members of Freedom are admitted nicotine addicts. Realizing this and admitting the reality of our addiction is part of the entry requirements. But more importantly recognizing and realizing our addiction is what finally gives us the ability to take control of our dependency relationship with nicotine. A guy named Bob said it so very well years ago here - I am an addict! Hooray!
Stating and believing
"I am not going to smoke today!" is how, in one form or another, I still start and end each day. It will prove to be a winning tactic for you too. In order to stay free from nicotine we only need to keep ourselves free of nicotine by Never Taking Another Puff One day at a time .


JoeJ Free, a nicotine addict & an ex-smoker who last administered nicotine 4 years, 2 months, 9 days, 21 hours, 20 minutes and 37 seconds Ago (1529 days).
Not needed, wanted or missed 39777 deadly dose delivery devices, and retained $10,596.55.
Reclaimed 276 days, 5 hours and 31 minutes of precious remaining life time.
Last edited by Joe J free on 11:50 AM - Mar 20, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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chasnfireflies
chasnfireflies

2:24 PM - Mar 20, 2009 #4

Greetings Cliff and congrats on 6 wonderful days of freedom. If your ex figures out how to live a stress free existence, please be sure to let me know her secret! ;)
It's good that you now understand that there IS no good time to do it, you just have to dive in and agree to NTAP! Kerry ~free for one month, one week and three days.
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CWZ
CWZ

3:09 PM - Mar 20, 2009 #5

Cliff,
Welcome to Freedom and welcome yourself home to the "real" you without the disruption of the poisonous chemical compound nicotine interefering with your brain and body. Congratulations on 6 days free. Tomorrow you will be through your Glory Week, but you are already well on your way on this journey back to "you". Life situations happen, ups and downs, good and bad, but one thing to keep in my mind and one situation you certainly have control of is this one principal that we all live by here at Freedom and that is "No Nicotine Today!". Each day, every day keep that commitment to yourself to Never Take Another Puff, Dip, or Chew!
CW
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grandmaroux
grandmaroux

4:34 PM - Mar 20, 2009 #6

Welcome aboard Cliff. You will truly enjoy the best trip of your life. Read often and write often, you are the one doing the work. Enjoy it! there is a big payoff coming, FREEDOM. Congrats on Glory Week. You are on your way. Just remember to Never Take Another Puff.
Doris
Free and loving it for 1 month 5 days 2 hours and 14 minutes
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Doc24747
Doc24747

8:10 PM - Mar 20, 2009 #7

Hi Cliff
Welcome to the party.
Read and learn here and you will do this.
It is much more doable than we thought.
Hang in there

Doc
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Amethyst
Amethyst

10:52 PM - Mar 20, 2009 #8

Hi everyone,

I can't believe that I have quit cold turkey after many attempts in the past though this time I was well prepared. Found the first few days a little uncomfortable but they passed and I didn't physically suffer anything. I find it's the cigs associated with things I do that did my head in, silly as it sounds though I am sure people will relate to this, cleaning the house the weekend and stopping for a break and having a smoke as a reward, doing grocery shopping, coming home, unloading groceries and having a smoke. For me also when the kettle went on for cup of tea the ciggs came out. I am now cleaning vigorously and rewarding myself with a pint of water and a sit down outside the front of house instead of back where I used to smoke (being ashamed to be seen smoking at the front!)

I must say though that already it is so great not to have to go for a cigarette. I am finding so much extra time in my day that I would have spent smoking. Even my children have noticed how we go out the door earlier in the morning. I am hoping now soon to put this extra time to much healthier use and start some exercise. I am lucky in that I have not increased appetite or need for any particular food so am making all this a total lifestyle and healthy change.

I am so happy to have found Whyquit.

A x
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cliff
cliff

4:27 AM - Mar 21, 2009 #9

Day 7, and I decided to sleep in late. Now I seem to be light headed and a bit jittery. No big problems with cravings though. Is this normal? I feel like i've had lots of coffee. Cliff
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RobinS614
RobinS614

5:57 AM - Mar 21, 2009 #10

Caffeine tolerance changes after cessation - possible changes

Blood sugar changes when quitting

"Is anyone else experiencing the symptom of...?"

Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
MP3
Length
Added
Starting week two of your quit 3.19mb 9.54mb 3.93mb 08:40 11/26/06
Last edited by RobinS614 on 7:28 AM - Mar 21, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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BJC
BJC

6:45 AM - Mar 21, 2009 #11

Hi Cliff and welcome! In my experience, after day 6, things got much easier. It seems you begin to get accustomed to the idea that you are truly a non-smoker! Your body will continue to thank you. Your self esteem should improve. Breathing becomes more refreshing and your sense of smell and taste begin to return: amoung other things. Remember to take one day at a time. One moment at a time, when necassary. Whatever it takes- to never take another puff. You're on the winning side of life now!!!
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ThePanster
ThePanster

1:31 AM - Mar 22, 2009 #12

Hi Cliff
Congratulations, Glory Week Graduate! Keep reading, spend some time with Joel's videos, and pay attention to the wise Oldbies here on the boards. The Oldbies say that if you do that, and of course, Never Take Another Puff, you'll be at comfortable place soon. And if you do all that, we'll have lots more to celebrate with you here! Looking forward to it, new Quit Friend.



Amanda

I have been free for 1 Month, 3 Weeks, 3 Days, 23 hours and 56 minutes (52 days). I have saved $141.09 by not smoking 794 cigarettes. I have saved 6 Days, 1 hour and 34 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 1/27/2009 9:30 PM

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cliff
cliff

11:05 AM - Mar 22, 2009 #13

Day 8 seem to be easier, got a blood pressure monitor, and I am now monitoring my reactions to coffee and stress. Had a major stress situation last night, and realised I was reacting emotionally. My only option was to leave the situation, and go home early... And when I did get a craving for a smoke, I just told myself... "how will that help me with stress!!!!", "will it make me feel better?"... No, the only danger was the thought that it would be so easy to do it....When you think about it, cravings can be very sneaky things.

Going well, all things considered

Thanks for the support :-)
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Joined: 2:04 PM - Nov 13, 2008

12:20 PM - Mar 22, 2009 #14

Hello Cliff and welcome to Freedom. I am glad that you are working at reinforcing the realization that a cigarette cannot really help resolve any actual stressful situations. I am going to attach a few of the stress articles below that touch on this issue. As far as for leaving a situation that was getting bad, I want to clearly point out that leaving a situation that you felt was getting out of hand was indeed a legitimate option.

I usually tell people who are worried about going to a certain event without smoking or dealing with a specific person or situation that they should at least give it a try and if things get tough, they can always just leave. I've had people often reply that if they go there is no way they can leave once they get to such a setting. I guess if the situation involves being on a plane or something similar this may be true, but in most situations leaving is an option. I usually point out to the people who say that there is no way they could leave a social or professional gathering once there, that if they all of a sudden get hit with a case of stomach flu or food poisoning, with uncontrollable diarrhea as a pronounced symptom, they are likely going to figure out a way to leave that setting. If they could figure out a way to leave for that reason then they could figure out a way for others too. I am going to attach a commentary below on avoiding triggers that explains why I want people to at least try to face the situation, but again highlight that your resolution of leaving is also always an option.

Joel
Joel's Reinforcement Library


I Have to Smoke
Because of All My Stress!


Stress is considered a cause for smoking by many people. Actually, smoking is a cause of stress. Recent correspondence dealt with reasons people give for going back to smoking: social situations, parties, alcohol consumption and stress. This month I wish to amplify on stress.

In January of 1979, Chicago and vicinity was devastated by a major blizzard. Heavy snows fell just after the New Year crippling the area. Additional snowfall continued throughout the week. During this time period I was barraged with phone calls from participants of the November, 1978 clinic claiming to be terribly nervous, upset and anxious from "not smoking." Curiously, most of them were feeling well during the month of December. They had occasional urges which lasted only seconds and were quite easy to overcome. What they were experiencing in January was different. Many felt that they were on the verge of cracking up. To them life was "just no good" without their cigarettes. Was the anxiety they were now experiencing really a side effect from giving up smoking?

To any outside observer the answer to the mysterious intensification of perceived withdrawal was obvious. In fact, if our ex-smokers listened to radio or television or read the front page of any newspaper, they would have encountered a story on cabin fever. By simply comparing their symptoms with those accompanying cabin fever they would understand what was happening.

Attributing the anxiety to smoking cessation was transference of blame. In fact, they were having a normal reaction to an abnormal situation - confinement due to the blizzard. They would have had the same anxiety whether or not they had given up cigarettes.

The above story illustrates an atypical time period in which numerous people experience similar complaints. In everyday life inherent problems exist. Work, family, friends, and money can all contribute to daily distress. Ex-smokers often think that if they just take a cigarette during a stressful episode the situation will be solved. For example, consider a person who finds he has a flat tire in a parking lot during a freezing rain. When encountering this kind of misfortune, the ex-smoker's first reaction often is, "I need a cigarette." What will actually solve this problem is changing the tire, and driving off in a warm car. What would a cigarette do to help this situation? It only makes the person see the flat tire longer and freeze more. This adds up to greater frustration. The first puff will probably reinforce the addiction to cigarettes which is a much greater crisis than the flat tire ever was. In fact, taking the first puff almost always results in a bigger problem than the crisis that "caused" them to take the puff. Even in a real catastrophe, such as a death in the family, injuries, illnesses, flooding resulting in major property loss, bankruptcy and so on, a cigarette will not solve the problem. It will just add another major problem to the originally bad situation.

Remember, smoking cannot solve problems of daily living. No matter what the problem, there is a more effective way of solving it than smoking. In fact, a smoker's health risks are a real problem that can only be solved if they - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!






While most smokers actually believe that smoking was an effective stress treatment strategy (a drug that calmed them down), when it really comes down to it, smoking never truly calmed them down. All it did was administered nicotine alleviated nicotine withdrawal that was induced by stress. The illustration and text below covers this point. The one true step that people are doing here to control their stress is getting rid of a product that should cause any thinking person a lot of worry and to stop the vicious cycle of drug feeding and drug withdrawal by always knowing now to never take another puff!

Joel
In the illustration above you can see on the left how a non-smokers reacts to stress. Without it they are happy and comfortable, when encountering stress they lose this comfort and depending on its severity they can get either mildly annoyed or really upset. The resolution of the stress will normally bring the non-smoker back to the original state of comfort, after a little time of cooling down of course.
Smokers are much more complex. Stress has an affect on all people--it makes the urine acidic. Both smokers and non-smokers experience this phenomena. In non-smoker smokers, the urine acidity has no real visible or perceivable effects--smokers are much more complicated. After the initial stress a smoker will feel like a non-smoker encountering stress, for a few seconds. But then the delineation occurs, the smoker's nicotine level depletes because of the urine acidity induced by the stress, and the smoker is kicked into a drug withdrawal state. The smoker has four ways to deal with the situation now.
First, the smoker can just smoke a cigarette. Well low and behold if the smoker does this he or she will feel "better." He or she will not feel good; he or she just won't be feeling withdrawal for the moment but still be feeling the initial stress. In essence, he or she will feel like a non-smoker under stress, not great, but not in withdrawal either.
The second way a smoker can handle the stress is to solve it and also smoke a cigarette. This results in one happy smoker. No stress now and no withdrawal, life is good at the moment. The feeling of bliss is basically the same feeling a non-smoker has who resolves his or her stress.
But then there are the other two scenarios. The smoker can solve the problem but not smoke. Here is the kicker here, the problem is resolved but the smoker is still in withdrawal, the nicotine level has dropped and problem resolution has no way to stop the nicotine depletion, only a cigarette can do that.
The worst of all situations is the smoker who cannot solve the problem and also cannot smoke a cigarette. This is a miserable situation to ever be in. You normally don't want to be around a smoker in this situation let alone being one yourself. Many smokers find themselves facing this dilemma daily since many jobs and social settings do not allow smoking yet constantly force the smoker to face stresses.
When you quit smoking these last four reactions to stress become a thing of the past. You still face stress, but you no longer have to face drug withdrawals induced by it. In essence you deal with stress in a totally different way when you don't have chronic drug withdrawals exaggerating it.
To stay in the position of being able to handle stresses with greater clarity and minimal discomfort always know that no matter what the stress, to avoid it having any long lasting and life threatening complications always remember to never take another puff!
Joel
Related videos:
Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Added
"I am climbing the walls because I quit smoking" 2.69mb 8.59mb 3.78mb 08:23 10/18/06
"I'll be a nervous wreck forever if I quit smoking" 3.87mb 11.55mb 4.77mb 10:30 11/29/06
Why do smokers smoke? 2.65mb 5.70mb 8.31mb 18:08 11/07/06
I Will Quit When...


"I will quit when my doctor tells me I have to." "I can't quit now it's tax season." "Maybe I will quit on vacation." "School is starting and I'm too nervous to quit." "I will quit in the summer when I can exercise more." "When conditions improve at work, I will stop." "Quit now, during midterm, you must be nuts!" "Maybe after my daughters wedding." "My father is in the hospital. I can't quit now." "If I quit now, it will spoil the whole trip." "The doctor says I need surgery. I'm too nervous to try now." "When I lose 15 pounds, I will stop." "I am making too many other changes to stop now." "I have smoked for years and feel fine, why should I stop smoking now?" "I'm in the process of moving, and it's a real headache. I can't stop now." "It is too soon after my new promotion, when things settle down I will stop." "When we have a verifiable bilateral disarmament agreement, I will consider quitting." "It is too late. I'm as good as dead now."

Amazing, isn't it, how so many people can come up with so many excuses not to stop smoking? If any of these were valid reasons why now is not a good time to quit, when did 47,000,000 ex-smokers in our country stop? They must have been experiencing at least one of these situations during the initial quitting process. The only difference between successful ex-smokers and the smokers making these statements is that the ex-smokers were bright enough to recognize that smoking was not really necessary to deal with any of these situations.

The best time to quit is NOW. No matter when now is. In fact, many of the times specifically stated as bad times to quit may be the best. I actually prefer that people quit when experiencing some degree of emotional stress. In most cases, the more stress the better. This may sound harsh, but in the long run it will vastly improve the chances of long term success in abstaining from cigarettes.

When people quit at an easy time in their lives, they begin to feel comfortable as ex-smokers as long as no problems surface. But there is always the fear that when things get difficult they will not be able to cope without cigarettes. Many, when facing their first real catastrophe, return to smoking because they were not equipped to deal with real stress as ex-smokers.

If, on the other hand, they had quit during a difficult time, they would have realized that even under severe emotional stress life goes on without smoking. They will be secure in the knowledge that they can deal with crisis, any crisis, as non-smokers. Once they overcame the initial quitting process they found they were able to deal with stress better. They were able to meet the physical and emotional demands in their lives more efficiently than when they were smokers. They were truly better equipped for survival in our complicated world without the "help" of cigarettes.

So, no matter what is going on in your life, quit smoking. When things get tough - show yourself how tough you are. And once off smoking, deal with all future problems in as constructive a manner as you possibly can, always keeping one essential stress management technique foremost in your mind - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!


How would you deal with
the following situations?



Your 2-year-old is having a temper tantrum because he wants a new toy. Would you;
  1. Leave him alone until he calmed down
  2. Give into his demands
  3. Give him a tranquilizer
Your 7-year-old is anxious about next weeks' Little League tryouts. Would you;
  1. Assure him that he can do it
  2. Practice with him and tell him to try his best
  3. Give him a valium every three hours until the game
Your 14-year-old is crushed when she is not asked to the sophomore dance. Would you;
  1. Fix her up with one of your friend's children
  2. Tell her to go anyway
  3. Give her cocaine to pick up her spirits
Your 15-year-old is self-conscious about being 5 pounds overweight. Would you;
  1. Cook lower calorie meals
  2. Enroll her in a diet or exercise program
  3. Put her on appetite suppressants

All of these young people are experiencing what adults would consider "growing pains." A little time, patience and positive reassuring will help them overcome all of these difficult situations.

The fact is, as long as anyone continues to develop physically, emotionally, intellectually, professionally or spiritually, they too will experience growing pains. Adults are prone to hurt, pain, sadness, depression and anxiety just as children are. These feelings are all necessary if we wish to continue to develop our minds and bodies. Without such growth, we would not experience happiness, satisfaction, contentment or purpose to their full extent.

The third choice in each of the above situations was, of course, ridiculous. We would not subject our children to chemical hazards to overcome such trivial problems. However, as adults we are fully capable of practicing such dangerous behaviors for our own relief. Take cigarette smoking as an example.

When you were still a smoker, how many times would you say you had to smoke because you were lonely and sad without your friendly cigarettes? How many times did you say that you had to smoke because of all the stress in your life? How many times did you tell yourself that many social activities were just not fun without your cigarettes? How many times did you say that you would gain too much weight if you quit smoking? All you were saying was that you needed nicotine, a drug, to overcome everyday life problems.

It was not until you were off cigarettes that you realized you could overcome such problems without smoking, and in most cases more effectively than when you were a smoker. Once you had quit you realized just how much a source of stress the habit was to you. You were caught by a socially unacceptable and physically deadly addiction and were quite often aware of it. This is when you had the desire to give them up, but thought the pain of quitting too great to even attempt it.

Even today, you probably still desire an occasional cigarette. It may be in a stressful situation, at a party after a few drinks, or at a time when you find yourself alone with nothing better to do. The fact is, there is nothing worse you can do than take a cigarette. One cigarette will not help you over the problem. In reality, it will create a new problem, a disastrous situation of a reinforced addiction, with all the physical dangers and associated dirty habits.

So, next time you have the desire for a cigarette, sit back and take a few moments to reflect upon what you are setting yourself up for. Do you need that drug? Do you want that addiction? If not, simply remember - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!



Avoiding Triggers

Many years ago I had a man named Mark (not his real name) join one of my smoking clinics. Mark came to me on the first day of the clinic and told me how he had recently added an addition on to his house and one of the rooms he added was a home office. Mark lived in a suburb about 20 miles from his office in downtown Chicago. Mark had the luxury that he didn't really need to go to his downtown office much and could do most of his work from home. He was nervous though because his home office was more than just his office--it was also his smoking sanctuary. Mark had small kids who were allergic to smoke and his wife didn't want Mark smoking around the kids. Since the kids were never allowed in the office anyway, Mark agreed only to smoke in that one room of the house. The office had in essence become his smoking room. He had only had the home office a short period of time now but the relationship seemed deeply ingrained.

When Mark was telling me about the new home office smoking room he confided in me that he was really scared to go into the room for he was sure it would be too powerful of a trigger and cause him to smoke. I told him he should go into the room quickly to overcome the fear but he said he just wanted to give it a few days before he attempted it. I figured I would let it go, thinking it would actually be good for Mark to get the additional experiences of driving to the city and working with other people proving to himself that he could deal with the outside world and still maintain his quit.

Mark never brought up the home office smoking room again during the clinic and I had basically forgotten about it too. Mark completed the clinic and sounded great at graduation. I figured he was on his way to a complete smoke free life.

A couple of months after the clinic was over I was following up Mark's group on a Saturday morning. Actually I had talked to him numerous times over the two month period but this conversation took an interesting twist. While on the phone Mark had said something about his office downtown and for the first time since I met Mark I remembered his concerns about his home office. I asked him if he was still going downtown much or mostly working out of his home office now. All of a sudden there was an awkward silence on the phone. Mark kind of hemmed and hawed for a while and said, "Well, this is kind of embarrassing to admit be I actually haven't gone into the home office yet."

I quickly said, "Mark, are you telling me that you have been driving 20 miles to and from work every day for two months because you are afraid that if you go into your home office you are going to smoke." He said yes, but it was worth it. He loved not smoking. Not smoking was great. So while driving 40 miles a day was a tad inconvenient, it was worth the effort since it was helping him to save his life.

I agreed it would be worth driving 40 miles every day if it were necessary in order to sustain a quit and thus saving his health and his life. The problem was that it was not necessary--Mark could work in his home office and just not smoke. To that Mark replied that the association was just too strong and his quit was just to valuable.

I asked Mark if he had a phone in the room in question to which he replied, "Of course I have a phone, it's my office." I said, "Mark, I want you to go into that room and call me back at this number." Now it took some real effort for me to persuade Mark to go into the room and to call me back. He was scared for he was totally convinced that being in that room was going to undercut his quit but Mark eventually goes into his office and places the call.

So I start a conversation of small talk with Mark, making a point of checking the clock at the beginning of the call. I knew some of Mark's family members and friends, and I started asking him questions about these people and making a real concerted effort of never broaching the topic of smoking once. Now I know most of you reader here have only gotten to know me from my writings and have never seen me live and talking but I can assure you that if you talk to any of my family members or friends, or especially to my clinic graduates, they will all attest that I can talk for hours on end even though I have nothing really important to say. I purposely engaged Mark into a half hour conversation consisting of absolutely nothing important--just small talk.

A half an hour into the conversation of small talk I abruptly blurted out, "Hey Mark, you have been in your home office now for 30 minutes. Have you thought about a cigarette once." Mark started laughing. He realized what I had done, getting him into the room and talking his ear off just to show him that he could be in the room and on the phone and not need to smoke. I think Mark instantly realized that his fears were unfounded.

I saw Mark last year, for the first time in probably fifteen or twenty years. He had now been smoke free for over a quarter of a century. We didn't really talk about smoking issues much either. It was no longer an issue in Mark's life. I just did my obligatory warning about never getting overly complacent, pointing out to him that over the past four years I had two people who were once 35 year ex-smokers who lost their quits. He was still well aware of what we taught in the clinic and was still totally committed to never take another puff.

As most people who read here have probably noticed, they have started saving lots of money since they have quit smoking. I suspect Mark had also saved a small fortune. This may not have been the case if we had not had our little conversation that Saturday morning. For if we had not talked that day Mark may have been driving an extra 200 miles a week, plus paying for parking for a quarter of a century. I don't even want to try to do the math of what these additional expenses would have cost. The fact is that they would have been totally unnecessary. When a person goes 25 years smoke free he proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that everything he was able to do as a smoker he can now do as an ex-smoker. This is a crucial lesson for all to learn.

Putting off facing certain activities triggers will likely prolong the stress, anxieties and fears that you will not be able to overcome the specific situation without relapse. All people who quit must realize that all you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker too. All it takes is proving it to yourself one situation at a time. You can continue to live your life and get through all events with your quit intact as long as you always remember to stick with your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel

Related videos:

Video Title Dial up HS/BB MP3 Audio Length Added
Avoiding situation where you used to smoke 4.67mb 13.94mb 5.75mb 12:39 11/29/06
"I'm not joining this clinic" 4.62mb 13.8mb 5.73mb 12:33 09/27/06
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Joe J free
Joe J free

10:06 PM - Mar 22, 2009 #15

Not better, just easier. Joel explains it very well in this article:

"Smoking IS easier than not smoking"

(That one should work. Exactly the right one. Thanks for the follow-up Joel. I should know better than to update my browser to a 'beta version'. Would not copy & paste links correctly).

Last edited by Joe J free on 10:49 PM - Mar 22, 2009, edited 3 times in total.
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Joined: 2:04 PM - Nov 13, 2008

10:16 PM - Mar 22, 2009 #16

I see the link in JoeJ's post above did not work. Here is the article I think he was referring to:

I saw where a member mentioned that not smoking hasn't been easy lately. It is true in some ways smoking is easier than not smoking. As the below article discusses, smokers don't have to make any real decisions on lots of real life issues--the addiction makes decisions for you. Some people may think that it is just a whole lot easier to let someone or something else make decisions or tough choices than for them to have to do it. Consider the kinds of decisions that cigarettes can end up making here.

Decisions
When you smoke, you don't really have to make many decisions. Cigarettes just have the ability to make all-important decisions for you. They decide how much time you spend with family and friends, at least non-smoking family and friends. When they say its time to go, well then it is time to go. They will decide how long you will stay in a movie, no matter how good the movie is.


They will help you make career choices. They decide where you work, non-smoking companies are probably out of your job prospects. They decide whom you hang around with at breaks at work, if you get a smoking break that is. They will help you with financial decisions too. They decide how much you are willing to spend for them. Actually, you are willing to spend whatever they are going to cost. They will decide insurance premiums too.



They will help dictate your public persona. They decide your overall aroma, for no matter how you try to mask their odor they are the predominate smell that people associate with you. They will help people make first impressions of you too.



They decide when you go shopping. You will put your safety on the line going out during blizzards or storms or whatever inclement conditions are thrown at you. When you run out of cigarettes, they tell you its time to go out and get some more not matter what the risk.



They make other lifetime decisions too. They decide whom you will eventually marry, or at least, who may marry you. They will decide how often and when you get sick, and they have many surprises for you along these lines. They even have the ability to make the ultimate decision for you; they can decide when you are going to die. Is it easier letting an inanimate object make these decisions for you? Of course it is. But is it preferable to let them make these decisions?

Think about that. The odds are if you realize the decisions cigarettes have in store for you, you will probably finally make a decision for yourself. The decision you will make is to Never Take Another Puff!
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cliff
cliff

11:45 PM - Mar 26, 2009 #17

Hi people.
Day 12, and the days are getting easier. Being around smokers has lost its stress factor, and cravings are no problem then.
Had a stressful time under pressure yesterday, and got through it. It was only after the incident that I realised my old
patten would have been to have many smokes during this time, probably making things worse.
Anyway, my support group is very happy with me!

Thanks poeple

Cliff
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karebear509
karebear509

12:09 AM - Mar 27, 2009 #18

Hi Cliff, Glad to see you made it through your day smokefree! 12 days is great. Keep on going and just remember that it does get easier with time. Have patience with yourself and comfort will come just NTAP. Karen 2mo.17days of freedom
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Doc24747
Doc24747

9:29 AM - Mar 27, 2009 #19

Hi Cliff
Well done so far. You are a way down the road now and it will get easier.
Stick with it!

Regards

Doc

5 months 13 days
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cliff
cliff

8:06 AM - Apr 02, 2009 #20

Hi Everyone! 19 days, and it is getting easier. More energy, clearer thinking. Have been working on reducing stress in other parts of my life, and have noticed improvements in my blood pressure as well. Still get cravings at really odd times, but they pass quickly. Anyone had a dream in which they picked up a cigarette? I dreamed that I did without thinking about it, then realised what i did, and gave it to another smoker, in the dream i was very upset with myself. I was very relieved when I woke up. Is this common? Cliff
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Doc24747
Doc24747

8:23 AM - Apr 02, 2009 #21

Hi Cliff
Yes it is common - read here : The smoking dream
I am nearly 6 months in and I still get them.
They are no big deal though.

Keep with it.

Doc.
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cliff
cliff

3:03 AM - Apr 14, 2009 #22

Hi again people :-) just came it to say I made it to one month. One amazing thing i've noticed, is that I seem to have more interest in my general health not the smokes are gone. Taking more notice of my health now that i am no longer poisoning myself! Thanks again for the support people Cliff
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