Hissy Fit

Carolyn green
Carolyn green

11:54 AM - Oct 08, 2003 #1

I live in a house with thirteen people and I am now the only non-smoker. I am also slowly going insane. I am in college and Really cannot afford to move out, but at the same time I am asthmatic so comming home to find my room filled with smoke is angering. "close your door" they tell me, "It's not that bad", "Light incence". Am I really being so unreasonble or is my family? Both maybe? What should I do?
Carolyn
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

7:23 PM - Oct 08, 2003 #2


Carolyn, I'd put my continuing recovery and no nicotine today, not one puff, above all else. If in fact you are asthmatic and you are reacting to the smoke, relapse to intentionally destroying your own lung tissues by directly assaulting them with mainstream smoke containing 4,000+ chemicals makes zero sense.

As you may have read, Carolyn, the cigarette brand you smoked may very likely have contained bronchial dilators. The cigarette companies use them to help open your lungs up deeper so as to get more nicotine to the brain quicker. It can hide or even mask a number of breathing disorders. If you're having trouble breathing, Carolyn, get seen and evaluated by your primary care physician or a pulmonary specialist.

Carolyn, you may have to move or indoor smoking policies may need amending for health reasons but that's between you, your physician and the owner of the building who regulates indoor smoking policies. Listen to your doctors Carolyn as we have no way of knowing how much of your concerns reflect serious medical issues that may need immediate attention and how much may reflect the fact that you are breaking free from your addiction to nicotine while living in an environment where the thirteen other inhabitants feed their chemical dependencies indoors.

You have real issues to deal with there but they are not an excuse for chemical relapse. I wish we could do more to help that offer words. Please post back to this thread letting us know the outcome. Imagine all of us having once been problems for others - guilty as charged. Living only one rule will solve our nicotine dependency concerns - no nicotine today! John

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Dionne (gold)
Dionne (gold)

10:26 PM - Oct 08, 2003 #3

Oh Honey, you're in a real jam! I want you to think about something now, "Don't use this as an excuse to return to the seductive smoking scene." In fact use this as a strengthening tool to reinforce the powerful stand you are taking for your own life. You do know that the others are jealous don't you? and may use all their wiles to get you back with them on their 'drug of choice'? You're proving you are your own person with a powerful motive to live better, with more options, with purpose, and all with a sweet smelling breath of life. Don't let yourself down here, one day at a time, and get your head stuck out the window for some clean air.
Today is my 3rd anniversary of my quit and I still live with beloved husband who continues to smoke in the living room. Of course I don't use the living room anymore, but have plenty of room to share. But if I didn't have room to share....? Then his beloved sweet as..... would be smokin outside!
Good luck to you Carolyn, I'll be glad to see you continue to post here. This site and the swell people make you want to join in.

YQS, Dionne
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Joel
Joel

10:42 PM - Oct 08, 2003 #4

Hello Carolyn and welcome to Freedom. Carolyn, you are not being unreasonable about wanting to avoid the smoke from your family members. I need to point out, I am not a radical on the idea of a person having to avoid smoke or smokers in order to sustain a quit. I always spell out quite clearly that if an ex-smoker wants to spend time with smoking people or is forced to spend time with people smoking that they can in fact do it and keep their own quits intact. The string we have on Second Hand Smoke spells out why second hand smoke does not pose a risk for causing a person to relapse.

But second hand smoke does pose a certain degree of health risk to exposed non-smokers and poses a very specific health risk to people with asthma and any respiratory problems. You may want to get literature from your local health agencies that will spell this out and pass it along to your family members. You may also want to talk to your doctor who is treating your asthma to see if he or she would be willing to make a case to your family that their smoking is in fact hurting you. Again, I want to make it clear that the problem we are talking about is not that their smoking is putting your quit at risk, but it is putting your health at risk. It is not unreasonable for you to want to minimize the problems of your asthma.

Please know that as dangerous as your family member's smoke may be to you, your smoke was always a greater risk. While you may not be able to control the risks posed to you by others you have full control over this greater risk that you posed to yourself and will always be able to steer clear of those risks now as long as you always stick to the person commitment you have made to never take another puff!

Joel
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jennifer
jennifer

10:50 PM - Oct 08, 2003 #5

Hi I feel really sorry for you it must be so very hard having to breathe in their second hand smoke and so many of them. I have a smoking husband but he is such a darling he now no longer smokes in the house and if we go in my car or I go with him in his car he also no longer smokes He has been so surportive of my quit I am just waiting for him to quit. Maybe you can ask the smokers if they would please smoke outside just explain that you are really trying so hard to quit and they are not helping you at all maybe just suggest that when you are there they please go outside and if you are not there it is their choice where they smoke you never know it may work. My only other sugestion is you wear a surgical mask when they smoke they may get the hint so good luck and keep with it never take another puff I have been nicotine free for 2 months 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours and sooooo proud of myself
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Golddabler1
Golddabler1

5:59 AM - Oct 09, 2003 #6

Hi carolyn
WEll done for keeping your quit under difficult circumstances,your family say it is,nt that bad,they are saying this from a junkie point of view,when we first tried cigarettes they made us choke and cough but our body had to get used to it to cope with our addiction,when you have quit for the length of time you have your body has become sensitive to these poisons and that is normal because its a message from mother nature to let us know about the harm,your family have desensitised themselves,i can,t tell you wether you should move out or indeed insist on a new policy,but i can tell you for sure never ever to take their wrong thinking on board and keep this quit going,is the season changing in your area,if its getting a bit cooler try wrapping up warmly and then open a window and if they complain about it being cold tell them its not that bad really.Another thought i had was to find out if there is a device that takes away smoke ie like the way ionisers and dehumidifiers work,for other things.
Rickdabler 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 19hrs happily nicotine free.
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PegIsGold
PegIsGold

10:27 AM - Oct 09, 2003 #7

Hi Carolyn,

I don't know how big your house is, but it would have to be pretty big to be able to tolerate the effects of 13 people smoking inside. Even when I was actively feeding my addiction, being in a house with that many people smoking would not have been desirable. It's hard to imagine that all 13 people think "it's not that bad." Phew!

Maybe you could have a little family meeting--a pot luck or something fun, and discuss the possibility of a compromise, designating certain rooms in the house as smoking and non-smoking areas. And you could close off a room or two to keep the smoke out. You are the judge of how all the smoking is affecting you. Be honest with them and tell them your health is as stake because of your asthma.

I sure hope you can work it out. If they won't work with you, perhaps you have another relative or a friend who could use a roommate. Good luck, Carolyn, and hang on to that precious GREEN Quit! We're pulling for ya!

(I like Rick's idea about the window)

YQS ~ Peg

3 Months, 7 Days of life as it should be;
6 Days and 19 Hours added to my life;

1967 Cigarettes Not Smoked;
$355.50 that didn't go up in smoke!
Thank you, Freedom Family!
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Carolyn green
Carolyn green

8:59 PM - Oct 09, 2003 #8

Thanks all of you for the support with my quit, but I am really not going to relapse. Quitting almost literally killed me and I am not trying to do that again. Thats why I posted under my new life, I am no longer worried about quitting, just how to get my family to accept that I have. I was ticked off the other day, but what I said was true and more...like they call me a quitter...I think that they mean it as a compliment even though they say it meanly...anyways Thanks a lot and good luck to you all.


Carolyn
I have been quit for 4M 3W 1D 4h 51m (145 days). I have saved $424.19 by not smoking 2,178 cigarettes. I have saved 1W 13h 30m of my life.
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