LornaMc5
LornaMc5

February 21st, 2003, 8:18 am #26

I know this thread is really long now - but it is such a good thread, thanks Lotus.

Just something that OBob (a chara) said hit home with me (as usual)...

"It makes it tough, because you feel like you can't just abandon someone seeking help; but if they're not willing to seek it on their own, there has to be some question about the ultimate seriousness with which they're treating their quit. This is about life and death for many of us."

and...

"It's close to my heart at the moment, because I had one of my friends relapse recently after a 6 week quit...."

My mother was in hospital for the first two weeks of January (great way to ring in the new year, eh?). She had an acute asthmatic attack which led to what was diagnosed ominously as "late-stage respiratory failure". She was lucky in that she came through it ok - but, naturally, she was "ordered" to end her 40 year courtship with cigarettes.

Well, she did not smoke for six weeks. The week after I quit, she started. We used to be smoking buddies, a long time ago. But we don't see each other all too often nowadays. I mentioned that I had quit, but I didn't push my quit philosophies on her. Just made reference to how much better life was shaping up to be without cigarettes, and didn't she find that to be the case too... that kind of thing.

Well she came over two days ago just reeking of cigarettes. I didn't say anything, aside from an offhand remark on how grateful I still am to have quit. It was an uneasy visit, and I felt very sad for her when she left. She stopped by again yesterday, she was uncharacteristically brief and again, she seemed so sheepish. Which just makes me so sad. Though at the same time this also strengthens my resolve that much more.

This IS about life and death for many of us... she almost died two months ago. Five years ago, her husband (my stepfather) did die from nicotine addiction (2-3 packs a day for 30 years). Two weeks after his 58th birthday he had a heart attack (on sweetest day).

So this is close to my heart too. First, because I am two fragile weeks into this new & unfamiliar (& wonderful) way of living. And second, because now that I am learning how to break through the lies and deceptions of my addicted mind - I can see so much more clearly what it is doing to my mother. And there really is nothing I can do about it aside from perhaps being an example, as Bob also pointed out.

Well now, I've got my venting over with too for now - thanks again, folks.

(agus - go raibh maith agat OBob )

LornaMc
very glad to proclaim that I have not smoked for 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours & 50 minutes
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wcsdancer (Gold)
wcsdancer (Gold)

February 21st, 2003, 9:34 am #27

This message has been deleted by the author.
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wcsdancer (Gold)
wcsdancer (Gold)

February 21st, 2003, 9:37 am #28

Cigarettes not smoked: 5626. Money saved: $1,265.89. Time/life saved 1 month 1 week 1 day 1 hour.
1 Year 3 Months 1 Week 4 Days 20 Hours 21 Minutes 21 Seconds.
Lotus, I know this is not a parade but I just wanted your boyfriend to see how the stats add up even if you're only a "social" (closet in my case) 1/2 a pack a day smoker. Not to mention the fact that I was a beeyatch for about seven years after I relapsed back into closet smoking (limiting my consumption to a 1/2 pack a day ration). It's horrible to be in constant withdrawal, talk about grummmpppyyyy. Tell him to bite the bullet and just Never Take Another Puff! Thanks for the great post and congrats on your awesome stats!
yqs, *Candy* (Gold)
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GeorgieGirl GOLD
GeorgieGirl GOLD

February 21st, 2003, 9:52 am #29

As Joel has said, I was one of those quitters who has quit numerous times for long periods - without the understanding as to why I could never stay off smoking. My last long Quit (before my now educated one) was lost when a "social smoking" ex-boyfriend of mine offered me a cigarette after years of me not smoking. His rationale was "you haven't had one for so long, you won't start again". Me - being uneducated about that "one puff" succumbed and figured maybe I could just have one. How WRONG I now know that I was!!!!! Was not long before I was back to full-time smoking. I really did delude myself ..... I really was quite shocked that I became a smoker again. It didn't make sense after so long being Quit???? The hardest part was the not understanding??? I soon realised I had no control over my addiction. It took me another 5 years - and the life saving day that I found WHYQUIT.com - for me to finally understand what had happened. I am an addict. I can NEVER have just one puff. Education was my saviour ..... it took me time to get here, valuable time - but I am here and I am NEVER TAKING ANOTHER PUFF again ... the price to pay is too high. Besides .... I am way too educated now. Thank you Freedom .... and thank you for this thread Lotus .

Georgia
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SammymnGOLD
SammymnGOLD

February 22nd, 2003, 2:55 am #30

Happy Friday!

What an excellent thread you've got going there sweet quit sister I.L. (And some mighty impressive numbers I might add!) . The lies we tell ourselves: geez! (or "told" I should say).

I remind myself often of the law of addiction. I always force myself to add: "and you're no exception girl."

Have a great unquestionably smoke-free weekend!

, Sarah( 7 Months 2 Weeks 3 Days 3 Hours 8 Minutes 30 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 4642. Money saved: $988.88).
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

March 19th, 2003, 11:29 pm #31

For Alex
Oh, and be sure to read all of the responses...there are some real gems in there from Joel, OBob, et. Al.
YQS- Lotus
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Golddabler1
Golddabler1

March 20th, 2003, 4:14 am #32

GOOD SUBJECT IRISH,I LOST A PREVIOUS YEARS QUIT DUE TO SEEING A SO CALLED SOCIAL SMOKER CARRYING A PACKET OF PAPER NEEDLES.I WAS INTOXICATED BUT HAD BEEN MANY TIMES BEFORE WITH NO TEMPTATION,ANYWAY MY POINT IS THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A SOCIAL SMOKER.I WAS A SOCIAL SMOKER THEN I BECAME SECRET SMOKER AND I CAN GUARANTEE THAT MOST SO CALLED SOCIAL SMOKERS WILL HAVE A FLY PUFF AND BECOME SECRET ADDICTS OR FULL BLOWN ADDICTS.I WEEK 2 DAYS 16HRS 5MINS NICOTINE FREE.
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MsArmstrongKIS
MsArmstrongKIS

March 20th, 2003, 6:55 am #33

Dear Lotus-oh how I love this thread. Would that I had the patience of Joel with current smokers. . .lately I feel an urge to walk up to them and say words to the effect of:

"Do you know that what you are doing right now is so bad for you it could cause you to die painfully within the next few years?"

or

"Do you know that all of the fear you have of quitting is much, much bigger than the actual event will end up being? And that all of the denial you are putting into the act of smoking that cigarette will be much, much smaller than the pain you have an excellent chance of going through later, when your health fails?"

and then

"whyquit.com!! Joel Spitzer!! It's all there, just take a couple of hours and you'll see! It won't cost you anything and could help you save thousands of dollars and probably your life!"

The last time I quit the only way I could survive the trigger of watching others smoke was to think of them as really stupid people. I don't think smokers look stupid, anymore. I think they look tragic. Not stupid, because an addiction can happen to anybody. But tragic, because anybody can kick an addiction.

However, the smokers I know who try to quit but refuse to understand how to actually make that happen. . .now that just makes me crazy. And yet they look at me as if I'm nuts when I am so impatient/intolerant about their relapses!

I guess the only person I really have to be impatient/intolerant about relapsing is

Alex
1 month 5 days

Thanks for bringing this up for me, Lotus. Right on!
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

April 8th, 2003, 5:58 am #34

For Carlene...because now YOU (not your husband) are the one who's in control of your nicotine addiction! Way to go! and Congrats on one whole week!
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Joel
Joel

April 8th, 2003, 6:04 am #35

Hello Irish Lotus: I am glad you brought this one up again. I was trying to find it a while ago. I wrote a response early on in this string that addresses Carlene situation too. I am posting it again below. Thanks for finding it. Joel _________________ Thanks for sharing your insights of your boyfriend's experience here. You can learn from two very different groups of people what it takes to quit smoking and to stay free from cigarettes. The first group that you can obviously learn from is people who have quit before you and have successfully been able to stay free from cigarettes for a significantly long time periods. They may have quit with very little understanding of the problems involved with smoking or quitting, but something internal in them knew that they were and still are fighting a puff. For if they did not understand this premise they would not have been able to stay off smoking for as long as they have.

The other group you can learn from is from people who have tried to quit once or more likely numerous times and have yet been able to stay off of smoking. They too offer deep insights to the addiction. Not that they actually themselves understand what is happening or why-they are often in a total quandary as to why they cannot stay off of smoking. You don't learn from these people by listening to their advice or explanations, but more so by watching their failures and learning to listen between the lines. They can supply you with the real answers even though they themselves do not know the answers or even understand the questions.

This group of people can either inadvertently help you sustain your quit or, if you are not careful, they can undercut your quit. A person who relapses will often try to delude him or herself that he or she has not lost control over nicotine even after he or she has relapsed. The person will often also try to delude those around him or herself too. It is not that a relapsed smoker is inherently dishonest. He or she may truly believe that he or she can control addiction. That belief is what allowed him or her to take the first puff in the first place. Very few people take the first drag with the game plan of relapsing. They have deluded themselves that they are somehow going to control the quantity or duration of their smoking. They may sound mighty convincing to you as they are trying mighty hard to convince themselves of their control over nicotine.

Patience is the virtue that is going to allow you to learn from other people's mistakes as opposed to repeating them. You have already proven that you have the ability to be patient. The first few days you were quitting your body was likely trying to convince you that smoking was okay. But you listened to all of the others who were here before you and decided to give yourself a chance to see if what they were saying was actually true--that quitting would get easier. Now you are showing patience again. Instead of just listening to your boyfriend rationalizations and comments of his ability to control nicotine, you knew to sit back and watch events unfold.

It was only a matter of time before he lost his control to the degree that he could no longer hide nor deny his inability to control his usage. He is once again under the influence and control of nicotine. He has been under that control ever since he took the first drag off the first cigarette. While he may openly be admitting now that he lost control, there is still a pretty good chance that he does not yet fully appreciate when it happened. He may very likely think that it was his fourth or tenth or hundredth cigarette that did him in this time. He needs to understand that the cigarette that set up his downfall was the first one or he his going to be doomed to face this kind of wasted effort over and over again.

Sadly you can't force him to believe you that one puff was going to do in his quit any more than he was able to force you to believe him that he was going to control his smoking. People are only going to accept the word of others up to a point. The best you can do now is continue to watch and analyze each other's quits.

There was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. He was a controlled smoker and you were an out of control smoker. At least that is how he saw things. But now you are a totally under control ex-smoker having a relatively easy time of things as far as nicotine is concerned. While be may still be trying to deny it, he is an out of control nicotine addict now, constantly suffering moderate to major nicotine withdrawal or else having to put his credibility, integrity and reputation on the line by smoking when he claims that he no longer needs to.

As I said before, there was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. For people who view themselves as social smokers often think that it is a personality flaw in others that allows them to smoke in a way that seems to be such an out of control manner. You have proven though that you are either smarter or stronger than he is when it comes to smoking now. I am sure that is just one more humiliating aspect that his relapsing is costing him.

So sit back and watch him in his struggles. Hopefully he will sit back and watch you and your success. Maybe one day he will see the light. Maybe not, there is no way to know what the future holds for him. But for the present you can see the light every day you watch him still smoking. He is either smoking or edgy because he is not smoking. He is in a miserable state that you no longer go through now. Also you will never have to experience this kind of chronic withdrawal again as long as you continue to learn lessons from him and all of the other smokers you know and also from all of the long-term ex-smokers you know too. The more people you observe in your real world the more obvious it will become that the only way to stay smoke free is simply just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

April 23rd, 2003, 10:31 pm #36

For Jennifer
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Joel
Joel

May 12th, 2003, 10:43 am #37

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Joel
Joel

May 12th, 2003, 10:45 am #38

For Alex:

The following text is lifted from above:

You can learn from two very different groups of people what it takes to quit smoking and to stay free from cigarettes. The first group that you can obviously learn from is people who have quit before you and have successfully been able to stay free from cigarettes for a significantly long time periods. They may have quit with very little understanding of the problems involved with smoking or quitting, but something internal in them knew that they were and still are fighting a puff. For if they did not understand this premise they would not have been able to stay off smoking for as long as they have. The other group you can learn from is from people who have tried to quit once or more likely numerous times and have yet been able to stay off of smoking. They too offer deep insights to the addiction. Not that they actually themselves understand what is happening or why-they are often in a total quandary as to why they cannot stay off of smoking. You don't learn from these people by listening to their advice or explanations, but more so by watching their failures and learning to listen between the lines. They can supply you with the real answers even though they themselves do not know the answers or even understand the questions.

This group of people can either inadvertently help you sustain your quit or, if you are not careful, they can undercut your quit. A person who relapses will often try to delude him or herself that he or she has not lost control over nicotine even after he or she has relapsed. The person will often also try to delude those around him or herself too. It is not that a relapsed smoker is inherently dishonest. He or she may truly believe that he or she can control addiction. That belief is what allowed him or her to take the first puff in the first place. Very few people take the first drag with the game plan of relapsing. They have deluded themselves that they are somehow going to control the quantity or duration of their smoking. They may sound mighty convincing to you as they are trying mighty hard to convince themselves of their control over nicotine.

Patience is the virtue that is going to allow you to learn from other people's mistakes as opposed to repeating them. You have already proven that you have the ability to be patient. The first few days you were quitting your body was likely trying to convince you that smoking was okay. But you listened to all of the others who were here before you and decided to give yourself a chance to see if what they were saying was actually true--that quitting would get easier. Now you are showing patience again. Instead of just listening to your boyfriend rationalizations and comments of his ability to control nicotine, you knew to sit back and watch events unfold.

It was only a matter of time before he lost his control to the degree that he could no longer hide nor deny his inability to control his usage. He is once again under the influence and control of nicotine. He has been under that control ever since he took the first drag off the first cigarette. While he may openly be admitting now that he lost control, there is still a pretty good chance that he does not yet fully appreciate when it happened. He may very likely think that it was his fourth or tenth or hundredth cigarette that did him in this time. He needs to understand that the cigarette that set up his downfall was the first one or he his going to be doomed to face this kind of wasted effort over and over again.

Sadly you can't force him to believe you that one puff was going to do in his quit any more than he was able to force you to believe him that he was going to control his smoking. People are only going to accept the word of others up to a point. The best you can do now is continue to watch and analyze each other's quits.

There was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. He was a controlled smoker and you were an out of control smoker. At least that is how he saw things. But now you are a totally under control ex-smoker having a relatively easy time of things as far as nicotine is concerned. While be may still be trying to deny it, he is an out of control nicotine addict now, constantly suffering moderate to major nicotine withdrawal or else having to put his credibility, integrity and reputation on the line by smoking when he claims that he no longer needs to.

As I said before, there was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. For people who view themselves as social smokers often think that it is a personality flaw in others that allows them to smoke in a way that seems to be such an out of control manner. You have proven though that you are either smarter or stronger than he is when it comes to smoking now. I am sure that is just one more humiliating aspect that his relapsing is costing him.

So sit back and watch him in his struggles. Hopefully he will sit back and watch you and your success. Maybe one day he will see the light. Maybe not, there is no way to know what the future holds for him. But for the present you can see the light every day you watch him still smoking. He is either smoking or edgy because he is not smoking. He is in a miserable state that you no longer go through now. Also you will never have to experience this kind of chronic withdrawal again as long as you continue to learn lessons from him and all of the other smokers you know and also from all of the long-term ex-smokers you know too. The more people you observe in your real world the more obvious it will become that the only way to stay smoke free is simply just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

June 3rd, 2003, 7:51 pm #39

The following text is lifted from above:

You can learn from two very different groups of people what it takes to quit smoking and to stay free from cigarettes. The first group that you can obviously learn from is people who have quit before you and have successfully been able to stay free from cigarettes for a significantly long time periods. They may have quit with very little understanding of the problems involved with smoking or quitting, but something internal in them knew that they were and still are fighting a puff. For if they did not understand this premise they would not have been able to stay off smoking for as long as they have.

The other group you can learn from is from people who have tried to quit once or more likely numerous times and have yet been able to stay off of smoking. They too offer deep insights to the addiction. Not that they actually themselves understand what is happening or why-they are often in a total quandary as to why they cannot stay off of smoking. You don't learn from these people by listening to their advice or explanations, but more so by watching their failures and learning to listen between the lines. They can supply you with the real answers even though they themselves do not know the answers or even understand the questions.

This group of people can either inadvertently help you sustain your quit or, if you are not careful, they can undercut your quit. A person who relapses will often try to delude him or herself that he or she has not lost control over nicotine even after he or she has relapsed. The person will often also try to delude those around him or herself too. It is not that a relapsed smoker is inherently dishonest. He or she may truly believe that he or she can control addiction. That belief is what allowed him or her to take the first puff in the first place. Very few people take the first drag with the game plan of relapsing. They have deluded themselves that they are somehow going to control the quantity or duration of their smoking. They may sound mighty convincing to you as they are trying mighty hard to convince themselves of their control over nicotine.

Patience is the virtue that is going to allow you to learn from other people's mistakes as opposed to repeating them. You have already proven that you have the ability to be patient. The first few days you were quitting your body was likely trying to convince you that smoking was okay. But you listened to all of the others who were here before you and decided to give yourself a chance to see if what they were saying was actually true--that quitting would get easier. Now you are showing patience again. Instead of just listening to your boyfriend rationalizations and comments of his ability to control nicotine, you knew to sit back and watch events unfold.

It was only a matter of time before he lost his control to the degree that he could no longer hide nor deny his inability to control his usage. He is once again under the influence and control of nicotine. He has been under that control ever since he took the first drag off the first cigarette. While he may openly be admitting now that he lost control, there is still a pretty good chance that he does not yet fully appreciate when it happened. He may very likely think that it was his fourth or tenth or hundredth cigarette that did him in this time. He needs to understand that the cigarette that set up his downfall was the first one or he his going to be doomed to face this kind of wasted effort over and over again.

Sadly you can't force him to believe you that one puff was going to do in his quit any more than he was able to force you to believe him that he was going to control his smoking. People are only going to accept the word of others up to a point. The best you can do now is continue to watch and analyze each other's quits.

There was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. He was a controlled smoker and you were an out of control smoker. At least that is how he saw things. But now you are a totally under control ex-smoker having a relatively easy time of things as far as nicotine is concerned. While be may still be trying to deny it, he is an out of control nicotine addict now, constantly suffering moderate to major nicotine withdrawal or else having to put his credibility, integrity and reputation on the line by smoking when he claims that he no longer needs to.

As I said before, there was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. For people who view themselves as social smokers often think that it is a personality flaw in others that allows them to smoke in a way that seems to be such an out of control manner. You have proven though that you are either smarter or stronger than he is when it comes to smoking now. I am sure that is just one more humiliating aspect that his relapsing is costing him.

So sit back and watch him in his struggles. Hopefully he will sit back and watch you and your success. Maybe one day he will see the light. Maybe not, there is no way to know what the future holds for him. But for the present you can see the light every day you watch him still smoking. He is either smoking or edgy because he is not smoking. He is in a miserable state that you no longer go through now. Also you will never have to experience this kind of chronic withdrawal again as long as you continue to learn lessons from him and all of the other smokers you know and also from all of the long-term ex-smokers you know too. The more people you observe in your real world the more obvious it will become that the only way to stay smoke free is simply just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

June 14th, 2003, 4:18 am #40

For Doodlebug:

Make sure to read the last comments above. (39)
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

July 11th, 2003, 12:45 am #41

For Layla Jane ... don't let the man get you down (they can be so STUBBORN sometimes)
Lotus
289 Days FREE!
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Joel
Joel

July 20th, 2003, 9:47 pm #42

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kensensei gold
kensensei gold

August 7th, 2003, 1:12 am #43

Since Lotus recently mentioned this thread I thought people might benefit from bringing it to the top. I would just like to refer back to my friend, who I mention in post 10 of the thread... She "quit" at new years (threw out her cigs!) and it only lasted a day or two and she has quit SEVERAL times since then with the same results. But she ABSOLUTELY, ADAMANTLY INSISTS that she can quit ANYTIME SHE WANTS and that she just doesn't happen to be in the mood right now. Recently she has often been a smoker in a group of nonsmokers and she (between asking for matches and cigs from total strangers) CONTINUES TO INSIST that she is just doing it for now for whatever reason and can still drop the whole thing ANYTIME SHE WANTS.... despite all the evidence to the contrary. As the old post form John says, "Isn't it time to start being honest?". For my friend Donna, who I *love dearly* and consider a sister in many ways, its just not time yet. I love her, but like Lotus, there is a limit to what I can do for her. I still hope she finds her way to freedom. But if she wants to continue to believe that its not an addicion and that she can just drop it anytime she wants---despite all the evidence... then I can't help her any neither can anyone else. Some things you have to learn for yourself.

Ken
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kensensei gold
kensensei gold

August 7th, 2003, 1:17 am #44

PS when I mention lotus I of course mean about her boyfriend and not her.... and I would also like to mention, for reference w/r/t Donna that I am at 6.5 plus months and that prior to January we both talked about quitting together many times. COLD TURKEY WORKS.
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Joel
Joel

August 29th, 2003, 6:14 pm #45

The following text is lifted from above:

You can learn from two very different groups of people what it takes to quit smoking and to stay free from cigarettes. The first group that you can obviously learn from is people who have quit before you and have successfully been able to stay free from cigarettes for a significantly long time periods. They may have quit with very little understanding of the problems involved with smoking or quitting, but something internal in them knew that they were and still are fighting a puff. For if they did not understand this premise they would not have been able to stay off smoking for as long as they have.

The other group you can learn from is from people who have tried to quit once or more likely numerous times and have yet been able to stay off of smoking. They too offer deep insights to the addiction. Not that they actually themselves understand what is happening or why-they are often in a total quandary as to why they cannot stay off of smoking. You don't learn from these people by listening to their advice or explanations, but more so by watching their failures and learning to listen between the lines. They can supply you with the real answers even though they themselves do not know the answers or even understand the questions.

This group of people can either inadvertently help you sustain your quit or, if you are not careful, they can undercut your quit. A person who relapses will often try to delude him or herself that he or she has not lost control over nicotine even after he or she has relapsed. The person will often also try to delude those around him or herself too. It is not that a relapsed smoker is inherently dishonest. He or she may truly believe that he or she can control addiction. That belief is what allowed him or her to take the first puff in the first place. Very few people take the first drag with the game plan of relapsing. They have deluded themselves that they are somehow going to control the quantity or duration of their smoking. They may sound mighty convincing to you as they are trying mighty hard to convince themselves of their control over nicotine.

Patience is the virtue that is going to allow you to learn from other people's mistakes as opposed to repeating them. You have already proven that you have the ability to be patient. The first few days you were quitting your body was likely trying to convince you that smoking was okay. But you listened to all of the others who were here before you and decided to give yourself a chance to see if what they were saying was actually true--that quitting would get easier. Now you are showing patience again. Instead of just listening to your boyfriend rationalizations and comments of his ability to control nicotine, you knew to sit back and watch events unfold.

It was only a matter of time before he lost his control to the degree that he could no longer hide nor deny his inability to control his usage. He is once again under the influence and control of nicotine. He has been under that control ever since he took the first drag off the first cigarette. While he may openly be admitting now that he lost control, there is still a pretty good chance that he does not yet fully appreciate when it happened. He may very likely think that it was his fourth or tenth or hundredth cigarette that did him in this time. He needs to understand that the cigarette that set up his downfall was the first one or he his going to be doomed to face this kind of wasted effort over and over again.

Sadly you can't force him to believe you that one puff was going to do in his quit any more than he was able to force you to believe him that he was going to control his smoking. People are only going to accept the word of others up to a point. The best you can do now is continue to watch and analyze each other's quits.

There was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. He was a controlled smoker and you were an out of control smoker. At least that is how he saw things. But now you are a totally under control ex-smoker having a relatively easy time of things as far as nicotine is concerned. While be may still be trying to deny it, he is an out of control nicotine addict now, constantly suffering moderate to major nicotine withdrawal or else having to put his credibility, integrity and reputation on the line by smoking when he claims that he no longer needs to.

As I said before, there was a time that he viewed you as weaker than him. For people who view themselves as social smokers often think that it is a personality flaw in others that allows them to smoke in a way that seems to be such an out of control manner. You have proven though that you are either smarter or stronger than he is when it comes to smoking now. I am sure that is just one more humiliating aspect that his relapsing is costing him.

So sit back and watch him in his struggles. Hopefully he will sit back and watch you and your success. Maybe one day he will see the light. Maybe not, there is no way to know what the future holds for him. But for the present you can see the light every day you watch him still smoking. He is either smoking or edgy because he is not smoking. He is in a miserable state that you no longer go through now. Also you will never have to experience this kind of chronic withdrawal again as long as you continue to learn lessons from him and all of the other smokers you know and also from all of the long-term ex-smokers you know too. The more people you observe in your real world the more obvious it will become that the only way to stay smoke free is simply just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

August 29th, 2003, 11:08 pm #46

Thanks for bringing this article up Joel....

Tim (the social smmoker in question) has actually quit recently. He has finallly come to the realization that there is no such thing as "smoking socially" and he is giving this cold turkey quit his bet shot. He quit as of Sunday (8/24...my 11 month anniversary) and if al goes well, he will be joining the green bus the day I take off in the golden jet liner. He still seems somewhat resistant to talk about his quit (he said it is easier for him NOT to talk about it), but he seems clear that one=all, and that he can't have just one. Hopefully he will come to me before he takes a smoke. ANYWAY, I have been very busy lately and have also not had access to a computer but I remain FREE...11 months and counting down,

YQS_
Lotus
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Joel
Joel

September 2nd, 2003, 6:19 am #47

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Joel
Joel

September 5th, 2003, 4:09 am #48

Another good one for Carl.
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Joel
Joel

October 4th, 2003, 5:15 pm #49

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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

October 13th, 2003, 5:54 pm #50

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