Sarita (Bronze)
Sarita (Bronze)

May 17th, 2001, 1:16 pm #51

For the folks posting that they are having a rough time with craves I wanted to take this back to the top. Zep wrote something, entry #31 on this thread, that really helped me immensly. Sorry but i don't have cut and paste capabilities here. If the craves are driving you up the wall check it out. One thing I know without a doubt is that all craves eventually end if we NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Julia @ 3 Months, 1 Week & 5 Days
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SunshineRay
SunshineRay

May 17th, 2001, 8:31 pm #52

Martha and Sarita you've both got loads of great advice there, and knowledge (and that's exactly what you need to keep your quit). My 2 cents worth for helping nervousness: Chamomile Tea, 3 bags (not 2), let steep in teapot for at least 15 minutes then drink, drink, drink and make some more.

sunshine
2 weeks, 6 days
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

May 17th, 2001, 10:03 pm #53

Just a note here on using herbals as a quit smoking aid. We at Freedom do NOT endorse the use of any herbals or other quit smoking aids. We do it au natural because it is the most effective way to go in the long run and there are no medical risks involved. We are taught to ride out the 72 hours and learn how to meet, great and defeat those triggers by taking deep breaths when encountering one. In just a few moments, that trigger is out the door.

Below is an article that Joel sent me on the herbal, lobelia, which is mentioned above. It is wrought with many dangers.

All we need to do for a successful quit and a life free from nicotine, is to never take another puff.
http://www.healthwatcher.net/Lobelia/lo ... zards.html
Lobelia inflata - Warning to Canadian consumers Lobelia is not generally recommended in the United States for nicotine withdrawl or replacement because first of all, it is not effective, and most importantly, it has serious toxic side effects. However, someone at Health Canada gave it a DIN number in 1997 .

In June 1997, two companies joined forces to promote a product that contained 130 mg. of Lobelia inflata. They were Paradise Promotions and Alta Natural Herbs & Supplements Ltd. .

"ALTA NATURAL develops and markets a product line of selective herbal and organic food supplements, including Shark Cartilage and Shark Oil products, which harness the leading curative powers of the world's oceans and plant life to promote and maintain better health for our clients." That's from their web site, and if you believe that, I have some nice swamp land off the coast of Florida for you to buy. I am tired of people going around raping and pillaging the oceans to hawk some hair-brained scheme to get rich quick.

ALTA is basically a public company listed on the Alberta Stock Exchange Symbol AHS. They inked a deal with Shoppers Drug Mart last fall to take orders for thousands of bottles of their latest remedy called BUTT OUT, or BUTTit OUT, depending on which fax, or which press release, or which label you have in front of you at the time. As far as I am concerned, that deal was one of the first indications that the stuff wasn't worth the gelatin that was wrapped around the "puke" weed. Shoppers is owned by Imasco, Canada's largest tobacco conglomerate.

You will also see when you read ALTA's home page that they also market Melatonin, a substance that is actually banned in Canada. Why would Health Canada approve this company to manufacture any herbal products if they advertise on their own web page that they sell Melatonin?

I heard about it because I was contacted by [url=mailto:pardis9@direct.ca]Larry Kunkel[/url] in order to see if I would make an announcement on my anti-smoking web site, NO PATSY. I sent Mr. Kunkel a list of sites that contained much of the information that is on this web page. I am amazed at the gullibility of marketers whose sole aim is to rip off the public, and I am also shocked by Health Canada and the media for going along with this dangerous product.

I contacted the appropriate people at Health Canada, and am awaiting an ATIP request to see who, and why this product was approved.

On September 2, 1998 I was in my London, Ontario office and proceeded to the nearest Shoppers Drug Mart at the Sherwood Forest Mall. It coincidentally is also the home of Herbal Magic's most lucrative store. But, that's another story.

I picked up my bottle of BUTT-OUT for Life and noted the small warnings about keeping the capsules away from children. There was no safety cap, no Mr. Yuck, or poison sign on the bottle.

Here is how the label reads in English:
Lobelia info: Lobelia has similar properties to Nicotine but it is non-addictive. The major alkaloid of this herb actually blocks Nicotine from reaching the Nicotine Receptors in the Brain's pleasure center, where Nicotine gives you the "high", thus reducing the desire to smoke!. Traditionally used by Herbalists as a Smoking Deterrent.

Indian Tobacco (Lobelia, Asthma Weed)
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 8th, 2001, 9:37 am #54

For our newbies We're with you!
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childofnite GOLD.ffn
childofnite GOLD.ffn

November 9th, 2001, 4:42 am #55

Hey newbies!!! Boy, are you reading the right thread! Great advice, everyone!

May I add a few?
How about: Drink a ton of water? That worked for me.

Also, chewing gum, both sugar free (don't want to pack on too many pounds, or cause my dentist to have a brain hemmorage) and sugary (don't want to get an upset tummy from the ingredients in sugarfree, as per Grumpy's advice months ago ) and alternate them.

And, I find that participating in ANY activity that was difficult when smoking will do the trick. For example, shopping, driving (if you didn't smoke in your car, of course) and movies. I stopped smoking in my house in May of 2000. So when I quit in July this year, my house wasn't a trigger area for me - only the entire outside world! lol!

I had trouble when I went into the kitchen, because it was beside the porch and deck where I smoked, but the entire upstairs, including our bedroom, the office and bathroom were low crave-risk places where I could hibernate for the first few days of my withdrawal from nicotine. Just being on FREEDOM and reading all of Joel's work, and the posts did the trick for me when I got overwhelmed from the cravings.

And if any of this doesn't help (Impossible! ), or if it isn't possible to do these things when experiencing a crave - SCREAM! It has two uses: One - it vents your frustration and is as good as a slap in the face to ol' nicodemon, because it disrupts his train of thought. Two - People around you at home or at work will think you are nuts and stop bugging you, thereby reducing your stress! LOL!!!

Hope these help!!! Stick with us, newbies. Freedom is the only place to be if you seriously want to quit. You are the most important person in your life - prove it! Love yourself enough to try!

Yqs, Diana
Free for 3 months, two weeks.
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Fly n (Silver)
Fly n (Silver)

November 9th, 2001, 4:51 am #56

I found sneezing helped. Well not so much the sneezing as trying to make my self sneeze. If you are have a tough time with your quit right now sneeze. Ah Chew! No a real sneeze. Concentrate as hard as you can on sneezing. Use all your will power and make yourself sneeze. Okay! Now that you are distracted. The urge for a smoke is gone. Let it go. It's over. The next urge will be less. Just distract yourself. I hear humming through your ears is tough.

LOL. Never take another puff.

Fly'n' -On Freedom.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 27th, 2001, 3:42 am #57

What works for you?
Don't be shy, share it!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 7th, 2001, 9:31 am #58

This message has been deleted by the manager or assistant manager.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 7th, 2001, 9:32 am #59

My best crave coping tip is hit back and hit hard!
Don't let Ole Nicodemon dictate terms!
He's had his turn! He's on the out and you're on the in!
It's a mighty fine feeling too!
Now, beat feet fella!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 2nd, 2002, 9:18 am #60

There's lots of good crave coping techniques but you'll have
to click the little arrows like these below to read them all-
First Previous Next Last
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Toast (GOLD )
Toast (GOLD )

January 6th, 2002, 10:23 am #61

For Wannalife ...
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wannalife (gold)
wannalife (gold)

January 11th, 2002, 11:56 am #62

Toast:

Thanks for the suggestion to read (and read some more)! These were great .... and they helped me get to GREEN! Gee ... I must be excited ... I keep telling everyone.

Thankful to be here and vow to get through this day without taking a puff.

wannalife is proud to say .... free and clean and nicotineless for 1M 2D 1m 20 s; 660 cigs. not smoked ... $132.00 saved Time to go shopping!
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Joel
Joel

January 13th, 2002, 12:30 am #63

From: OBob (Original Message) Sent: 1/12/2002 12:02 AM
I'm discovering that one of the joys of leaving smoking behind is that we find that

1) Smoking was never really a source of relaxation, but actually only a prop to keep us from having to face withdrawal.

2) There are a few hundred different healthy ways to relax that many of us ignored during the years we smoked. Some are 3 minute relaxation fixes and others are full-day fixes. What they have in common is that they promote REAL relaxation; not postponement of withdrawal.

Here are some rewarding alternatives that I've discovered:
  • hot, steamy shower/bath
  • similarly, hot tub, sauna, steam room
  • cup of tea (herbal if you want to avoid caffeine)
  • even an ice-cold Coca Cola -- I can taste it so much more now.
  • a walk around the block
  • standing in my back yard watching the birds or the clouds
  • walking on the beach -- I can smell seaweed again
  • backrubs (if you've got an obliging partner, give it a go)
  • lifting weights
I'd be curious what other ways y'all are discovering now that you're not administering nicotine any more....


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Joel
Joel

January 13th, 2002, 12:33 am #64

Quit Smoking Tip Sheet[/size]

  1. Quit cold turkey. In the long run it's the easiest and most effective technique of smoking cessation.[/size]
  2. Do not carry cigarettes.[/size]
  3. Quit smoking one day at a time. Do not concern yourself with next year, next month, next week or even tomorrow. Concentrate on not smoking from the time you wake up until you go to sleep.[/size]
  4. Work on developing the attitude that you are doing yourself a favor by not smoking. Do not dwell on the idea that you are depriving yourself of a cigarette. You are ridding yourself full fledged smoking because you care enough about yourself to want to.[/size]
  5. Be proud that you are not smoking.[/size]
  6. Be aware that many routine situations will trigger the urge for a cigarette. Situations which will trigger a response include: drinking coffee, alcohol, sitting in a bar, social events with smoking friends, card games, the end of meals. Try to maintain your normal routine while quitting. If any event seems to tough, leave it and go back to it later. Do not feel you must give up any activity forever. Everything you did as a smoker, you will learn to do at least as well, and maybe better, as an ex-smoker.[/size]
  7. Make a list of all the reasons you want to quit smoking. Keep this list with you, preferably where you used to carry your cigarettes. When you find yourself reaching for a cigarette, take out your list and read it.[/size]
  8. Drink plenty of fruit juice the first three days. It will help flush nicotine out of your system.[/size]
  9. To help avoid weight gain, eat vegetables and fruit instead of candies and pastries. Celery and carrots can be used safely as short-term substitutes for cigarettes.[/size]
  10. If you are concerned about weight gain, do some moderate form of regular exercise. If you have not been exercising regularly, consult your physician for a practical exercise program which is safe for you.[/size]
  11. If you encounter a crisis, (e.g. a flat tire, flood, blizzard, family illness) while quitting, remember, smoking is no solution. Smoking will just complicate the original situation while creating another crisis, a relapse into the nicotine addiction.[/size]
  12. Consider yourself a "smoke-a-holic." One puff and you can become hooked again. No matter how long you have been off, don't think you can safely take a puff![/size]
  13. Don't debate with yourself how much you want a cigarette. Ask yourself how do you feel about going back to your old level of consumption. Smoking is an all or nothing proposition.[/size]
  14. Save the money you usually spend on cigarettes and buy yourself something you really want after a week or a month. Save for a year and you can treat yourself to a vacation.[/size]
  15. Practice deep breathing exercises when you have a craving.[/size]
  16. Go places where you normally can't smoke, such as movies, libraries and no smoking sections of restaurants.[/size]
  17. Tell people around you that you have quit smoking.[/size]
  18. Remember that there are only two good reasons to take a puff once you quit. You decide you want to go back to your old level of consumption until smoking cripples and then kills you, or, you decide you really enjoy withdrawal and you want to make it last forever. As long as neither of these options appeal to you-never take another puff![/size]
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Joel
Joel

January 13th, 2002, 12:33 am #65

From: John (Gold) Sent: 1/1/2002 7:18 PM
There's lots of good crave coping techniques but you'll have
to click the little arrows like these below to read them all-
First Previous Next Last
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 22nd, 2002, 12:14 pm #66

Lots of wonderful stress breakers and aids here Jay Girl!
Also slow deep deep breathing while you clear your mind of all needless chatter and relax as you focus your concentration on your favorite color, object or person. Just a simple break from everything the underlying current of anxiety that many feel during early withdrawal. Cold water too !!!! You're doing great!
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Jerm (Gold)
Jerm (Gold)

January 22nd, 2002, 1:47 pm #67

If all else fails, I just hold on until it's time to go to bed. Once in bed and sleeping I don't have anything to worry about because that is 8 hours of not smoking in the bag, no problem!!! Didn't even have to try to not smoke for that 8 hours.

Good Times
Jerm
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Jay Girl
Jay Girl

January 23rd, 2002, 10:06 pm #68

Thank you for the tip John. I feel so good! Today is day 7. I have never had such resolve about anything in my life. I believe the reason is, I feel I am saving my life --- Literally. I am really looking so forward to the day that cigs do not pop into my head every 30 minutes. But the crave only last a minute. I have been taking deep breaths and blowing the hair out my mouth. This seems to always work. Hang in there everyone, and never take another puff. Have a great smoke free day.

Jay Girl
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lenguatron (green)
lenguatron (green)

January 23rd, 2002, 10:49 pm #69

Great tips!!! When I saw the picture of the raspberries, I remembered one thing I tried that was delightfully effective: One day at the grocery store, during my quit, on a whim I bought a $3 half pint of raspberries. Pretty indulgent for the produce section.
After I had long been home and those pretty berries were on my refridgerator shelf, I had an intense crave and decided to open the fridge. I saw those berries and smiled, decadently. I took one out to enjoy its beautiful design before I ate it, and it dawned on me--I could have wasted that same $3 on an ugly, gross-smelling, unfulfilling pack of cigarettes! But instead, here I was with a beautiful box of berries! More than 20 of them!
Not only did the berries distract me, killing my crave, they made me feel victorious over my crave.
I enjoyed every one of those berries more than I've probably ever enjoyed a berry in my life! Imagine how much more delightful a fresh raspberry is than a nasty, stale sickarette (I love that word! So much more accurate.)
So my suggestion is this: next time you're at the grocery store, or the gas station, or wherever you bought your little cancer demons, take the money you would have spent making your life miserable with a pack of sickarettes and spend it on something indulgent--a box of berries, a magazine, a toy, you name it!
You'll look at the thing you bought and LOVE that you got it instead of a pack.
Your newbie quit sister,
Mary
(Indulgently enjoying 3 weeks, 1 day, 8 hours, 42 minutes of fresh, sweet life!)
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

January 24th, 2002, 2:24 pm #70

Aha! I wondered what ever happened to my little list of relaxation / crave coping techniques. Knew it must have gotten moved, but never knew where to until now. ANYhoo, I'll add the following:

Sometimes a crave can become worse when I let it frighten me. If I turn away from it, and fear it's power. Because, at the end of the day, I think when you do this, you give power to the crave. A crave often ISN'T really that powerful, if you have the courage to stare it down.

Acknowledge it. Set it down in front of you. Ask yourself, what is this really? Do I really CRAVE a cigarette? Or is this just anxiety, and I remember how anxiety used to cause my nicotine level to drop, and how feeding my body more nicotine used to offset the withdrawals? How long is this lasting? Heck, count the seconds. 1...2....3....4...28...29.....am I still feeling like I was 30 seconds ago? Is it better? Worse? If I simply denied it, would it still be here in 5 minutes? How strong is it? If I rate this feeling, at this second, how does it compare with the one I had yesterday at 2pm on a 1-10 scale? How many 10s have I had over the past 24 hours. What other answers can I come up with to deal with this anxiety attack, if that's what it is?

What I tend to discover is that it's not as bad as my junky wants to pretend it is. It doesn't last as long as my junky wants to pretend it's going to. And, when I really think about it, I DON'T WANT TO SMOKE; but my junky remembers that that alleviated a different kind of anxiety before, and hasn't learned that anxiety comes from all different types of places (not just nicotine withdrawal), and that there are other ways to deal with this anxiety.

Nicotine's effect on withdrawal is like the effect you have when you put a large log on a campfire. When you first put the log on, the fire dims, and smolders. But a few minutes later, it's raging again. Logs don't put out fires -- they feed them -- ditto nicotine and withdrawal.

Okay, enough of this. I can see I'm starting to go off on tangents again....
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

February 21st, 2002, 12:02 pm #71

for our newbies......read earlier where someone suggested toothpicks. Toothpicks are the leading cause of choking. careful!!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

March 12th, 2002, 9:06 pm #72

Be Sure and Read the Early Member Coping
Tips that Were Posted to This Thread!
First Previous Next Last
When viewing large threads like this one, which currently has over 80 messages posted to it, it's important to keep in mind that each page of the thread holds just 15 messages. When the 16th message is posted to any new thread a new page is started. This thread has 6 pages of wonderful coping tips. After reading or scrolling to the bottom of each page you must turn the page 5 times in order to read all of them. Pages are turned by using the following commands located at both the top and bottom of each thread page.
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

March 13th, 2002, 5:31 am #73

As I have stated in a couple of my posts my quit this time has been very easy for me. I did have some cravings but not the ones I had anticipated prior in my mind. None the less I did have cravings but not as many or not as intense as most experience. A few come to my mind, mostly within the first week or so that were intense enough for me to remember.

Getting to the point, (something I haven't mastered my whole life) I would use my mind to create an atmosphere that was pleasant for me, where I never smoked. In my mind I would re-live that experience from the start to however long my crave went. My favorite pastime is Fly Fishing for Steelhead. These fish can exceed 20-30 pounds. They are nothing but rainbow trout that migrate to the ocean after a couple years in the rivers and spend 2 or 3 years in the ocean and come back to the rivers to spawn. Since I know exactly how these fish take a fly, I would imagine my line shooting out in the current, mending the line once and steering my line through the drift. Towards the end of the drift as the fly starts to slow and just kind of hang there I feel the tug of a fish taking the fly. This can be as gentle as could be or very aggressive. My line would tighten and this large fish would drift to the surface, not sure what was happening to it. As it realized it was not free anymore it would begin its struggle to set itself free. There is nothing in the world that compares to the fight of one of these fish. I would feel every run, visualize every jump and splash. To land one of these fish usually takes between 15 and 30 minutes or so. I visualized landing this creature and slipping the hook from its mouth. I would admire its beauty and let it slip from my hand back into the depths of the river where it emerged from.

This type of mental relaxation worked for me every time. Possibly it may help someone the same as me. Let me know sometime.

Roger

Loving my quit more and more each passing day.

I have chosen not to smoke for
2 Months 1 Week 5 Days 13 Hours 29 Minutes 57 Seconds.
Cigarettes not smoked: 2862. Money saved: $466.59.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

March 13th, 2002, 6:43 am #74

Wow Roger, talk about bringing back old memories. I did a post at about two months into my quit that Joanne or Benita (the real real oldbies, lol) may recall, about a crave and a fish. I'm going to pause right here and see if I can find in my puter - this is toooooo much! BRB...

I take it back, Roger, my memory of my early quit is getting terrible! I found it but my quit stats were attached and they indicate that it was made during my second week. Anyway, see if this doesn't ring a bell. By the way, the fish was a sea trout! For you newbies, we no longer use the candy coated word "slip" at Freedom. We call it what it is - RELAPSE! What I find astonishing is that we were both thinking about fishing during our early craves! That's wild!!!

I'm not worried about you slipping Molly and you know why. Yes, you said it, you've been one of the strongest amongst us and you just want to be a giver. Your sudden cry for help with victory so close reminds me of that seven pound trout I caught last March. When it first hit my hook, all **** broke loose. As it came out of the water and danced on its tail across the marsh inlet, I was sure I was going to lose it. But I didn't Molly. Still, the fight to the boat wasn't easy, but the pace was fairly steady. I felt its fight was starting to wane. I dipped and reeled and dipped and reeled some more. After about twenty minutes of slow going, the beauty at the end of my hook finally approached the boat. I could now see her vastness about 4 feet down, silhouetted against the whiteness of the oyster bed below. Just as I though the long battle over, and victory mine, the tip of my pole doubled over and my line started screaming. Yes, Molly, my prize below was giving its all in one last energy draining fight for survival. Sort of like ole' nicodemus is doing to you now. But like you Molly, I held on tight as it fought with every ounce of its remaining energy, and then, yes Molly, the prize was mine. Well sort of - it was far to beautiful a fish to keep, it won my respect and my heart, and hopefully still glides gracefully through the waters of the Isle of Palms. Hold on tight Molly . Breathe deep, hug hard, and live long. We're beside you if ya need us.

Zep.


I have not smoked for 1W 5D 10h 21m 32s, have skipped 621 cigs, have saved $85.46, and now faces the dilemma of having to figure out how to spend an extra 2D 3h 45m of life. In the garden, I think.
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

March 13th, 2002, 7:08 am #75

John,

Maybe it is a guy thing. The fishing I mean. An associate where I work, who just happens to be a lady, and who happens to have been quit for 3 years, related this same kind of story to me not long ago. She asked me how I initially coped with my craves. I told her this fishing story and how I relived this passion every crave. She broke into a small chuckle and told me when she was quitting she would always vision herslef and her husband having sex all the time. It was very relazing to her as well as very sensual with her mate. She said it worked great until the end. She continued with a smile and said, I had to end this daydream always short of completion because at the end of good sex I always craved a cigarette. I never asked her if she was serious or joking. having smoked for 35 plus years and having been married 30 years this Sept, I just took her word for it. I guess it all boils down to one thing,

However one deals with the craves and it works for them is the main issue in this thread.

Roger
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