John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 2nd, 2005, 10:36 pm #76


See each crave episode as
the true healing it reflects
Encountering and working through craves should be seen as a welcome and very necessary part of recovery. They are a sign of true healing. There's no need to fear getting better. Crave anxieties can flow from subconscious expectations conditioning or simple conscious fixation. One you get good at riding and the other you explore.

The beauty of encountering a subconscious feeding cue is that it is always less than three minutes in duration unless of course you decide to tag conscious fixation to the end. But for some unknown reason the subconscious mind does not persist beyond three minutes if it does not obtain the expected result - more nicotine. Better yet, in most cases your subconscious breaks the association between the triggering event or cue and your brain's anxiety generator with a single encounter.

In regard to conscious fixation, undoing conscious expectations is very much within our ability to control. Not only can we gradually learn to control the amount of time we allow our mind to remain fixated on any thought, we can explore the root beliefs underling those expectations. For example, the tobacco industry spends billions annually to brainwash each of us into believing that we keep buying pack after pack after pack for flavor, aroma, adventure, to relieve stress, to keep our friends or for pleasure.

The billions and billions of dollars (or pounds) of point of sale (POS) tobacco advertising signs that time after time bombard your brain each time you buy gas, candy, groceries or go to the pharmacy are there because they work. The hundreds of tobacco ads your brain catches glimpses of in magazines each year are there because they work. From Salem's current "excite the senses" campaign to Marlboro's "celebrating fifty years of flavor," they provide a rich source of fuel for the addict's mind, a smokescreen that hides the truth.

The truth is that once addicted to stealing our neurochemicals it really didn't matter if our particular brand had the most tolerable taste/flavor/aroma manipulation that we'd yet identified. The truth is that once hooked on the alkaloid nicotine that acid generating stressful events quickly neutralized our body's nicotine reserves, compelling us to service our addiction before addressing the stressful event.

The truth is that the 90% of adult smokers are chemically addicted to smoking nicotine under DSM III mental health standards and smoke because we must - because the rising tide of anxieties hurt when we don't. The truth is that any moment in time 70 -71% of surveyed smokers will tell you that they want to quit but just can't seem to pull it off. Truth is that roughly 20% of smokers are either in a deep state of dependency denial or do not yet consciously realize that they're hooked.

This piece on embracing crave episodes was intended to help you be brave just once so that you could see how much of the anxiety filling the moment was self-inflected. It's intended to help you experience the glory of your own raw healing as you feel a subconsciously triggered episode come, grow and then go.

Use your conscious mind as a tool to help reassure and quiet your deep, inner primitive mind. The next crave episode is not an event to be feared but a wonderful moment of healing and one more step to again fully expecting to encounter every aspect of life as "you!"

You're going home to a lasting calm and deep inner quiet that was lost when nicotine's two-hour half-life became the basic clock governing your body's flow of over 200 neurochemicals. The endless roller-coaster ride is ending. The real quitting took place the moment you lost sight of beauty that was you. We invite you to complete recovery and see what it's like to relax for hours at a time when life's pace permits.

Millions of words here at Freedom but only one rule determining the outcome for all ... no nicotine just one day at a time, Never Take Another Puff, Patch, Dip, Drink, ****, Lick or Chew! John (Gold x5)

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Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

March 8th, 2005, 6:28 pm #77

welcome to freeMarfar and mslindy6
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forza d animo
forza d animo

July 16th, 2005, 9:06 pm #78

Amongst the most well written and powerful messagages on this board, this one is timeless in its ability to help not only the newbie get through the initial stages of freedom but also in its ability to remind all of us that nicotine can do us no harm so long as we never take another puff.
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

August 19th, 2005, 2:33 am #79

Posting this in Janet's parade today reminded me how much I love this thread. It meant a lot to me early on in my quit, so I thought I'd kick it up for anyone who might need a little encouragement today. Thanks John!

YQS~
Lotus

Free and healing for 1,059 days and feelin' fine!
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Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

September 23rd, 2005, 9:09 pm #80

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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

November 25th, 2005, 12:40 pm #81

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Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

December 21st, 2005, 7:21 pm #82

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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

January 8th, 2006, 4:32 pm #83

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Kristen Goldx3
Kristen Goldx3

January 12th, 2006, 6:53 am #84

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 26th, 2006, 11:32 pm #85

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 6th, 2006, 1:52 am #86

"Just once, stop running, drop your guard, take slow deep deliberate breaths and then reach out to TOUCH your crave. It won't injure you! It's ok to be afraid but be brave for just one moment! Wrap your arms around your crave. Clear your mind for just one moment so that you can feel the true anxiety of your healing. Make sure that you feel your tummy rising as you take slow deep deliberate breaths into the bottom of both lungs. Clear your mind of all chatter, worries, fears and thoughts so that you can sense and appreciate exactly what this crave is like. Touch it, hug it, feel it, sense it! You won't make the anxiety one bit more intense than it otherwise would have been. You're witnessing part of the most beautiful healing that your body and life may ever experience. Yes, there is anxiety there but for the very first time it's not being fed and fueled by you. Feel it's strength slowing begin decaying. Take pride in your healing. It can't hurt you, only you can do that! Enjoy your recovery don't fear it! Embrace your craves! Enjoy your journey home! There is a very special person waiting at the other end!"
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Em B 12106
Em B 12106

February 17th, 2006, 7:20 am #87

There is a very special person waiting at the other end!

Thank you.
Em
Three weeks, four days, 20 hours, 13 minutes and 38 seconds. 387 cigarettes not smoked, saving $82.18. Life saved: 1 day, 8 hours, 15 minutes.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 25th, 2006, 10:31 pm #88

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

March 12th, 2006, 12:43 pm #89

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

March 27th, 2006, 11:24 pm #90

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 2nd, 2006, 10:31 am #91

See each crave episode as
the true healing it reflects
Encountering and working through craves should be seen as a welcome and very necessary part of recovery. They are a sign of true healing. There's no need to fear getting better. Crave anxieties can flow from subconscious expectations conditioning or simple conscious fixation. One you get good at riding and the other you explore.

The beauty of encountering a subconscious feeding cue is that it is always less than three minutes in duration unless of course you decide to tag conscious fixation to the end. But for some unknown reason the subconscious mind does not persist beyond three minutes if it does not obtain the expected result - more nicotine. Better yet, in most cases your subconscious breaks the association between the triggering event or cue and your brain's anxiety generator with a single encounter.

In regard to conscious fixation, undoing conscious expectations is very much within our ability to control. Not only can we gradually learn to control the amount of time we allow our mind to remain fixated on any thought, we can explore the root beliefs underling those expectations. For example, the tobacco industry spends billions annually to brainwash each of us into believing that we keep buying pack after pack after pack for flavor, aroma, adventure, to relieve stress, to keep our friends or for pleasure.

The billions and billions of dollars (or pounds) of point of sale (POS) tobacco advertising signs that time after time bombard your brain each time you buy gas, candy, groceries or go to the pharmacy are there because they work. The hundreds of tobacco ads your brain catches glimpses of in magazines each year are there because they work. From Salem's current "excite the senses" campaign to Marlboro's "celebrating fifty years of flavor," they provide a rich source of fuel for the addict's mind, a smokescreen that hides the truth.

The truth is that once addicted to stealing our neurochemicals it really didn't matter if our particular brand had the most tolerable taste/flavor/aroma manipulation that we'd yet identified. The truth is that once hooked on the alkaloid nicotine that acid generating stressful events quickly neutralized our body's nicotine reserves, compelling us to service our addiction before addressing the stressful event.

The truth is that the 90% of adult smokers are chemically addicted to smoking nicotine under DSM III mental health standards and smoke because we must - because the rising tide of anxieties hurt when we don't. The truth is that any moment in time 70 -71% of surveyed smokers will tell you that they want to quit but just can't seem to pull it off. Truth is that roughly 20% of smokers are either in a deep state of dependency denial or do not yet consciously realize that they're hooked.

This piece on embracing crave episodes was intended to help you be brave just once so that you could see how much of the anxiety filling the moment was self-inflected. It's intended to help you experience the glory of your own raw healing as you feel a subconsciously triggered episode come, grow and then go.

Use your conscious mind as a tool to help reassure and quiet your deep, inner primitive mind. The next crave episode is not an event to be feared but a wonderful moment of healing and one more step to again fully expecting to encounter every aspect of life as "you!"

You're going home to a lasting calm and deep inner quiet that was lost when nicotine's two-hour half-life became the basic clock governing your body's flow of over 200 neurochemicals. The endless roller-coaster ride is ending. The real quitting took place the moment you lost sight of beauty that was you. We invite you to complete recovery and see what it's like to relax for hours at a time when life's pace permits.

Millions of words here at Freedom but only one rule determining the outcome for all ... no nicotine just one day at a time, Never Take Another Puff, Patch, Dip, Drink, ****, Lick or Chew!

John (Gold x5)
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 11th, 2006, 10:46 pm #92

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Almost Island Gold
Almost Island Gold

April 12th, 2006, 5:10 am #93

This message has been deleted by the author.
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Almost Island Gold
Almost Island Gold

April 12th, 2006, 5:18 am #94

Hi everyone

It occurred to me on this subject to post here a link to OBob's favourite threads which I'm re-reading, namely those about facing craves. I guess they may be useful for everyone of us. This thread has also got other links which may be useful for newbies as well as for us when advising others to quit.
Sorry about the way I've indicated the link, because I don't know how to do it otherwise; just couldn't do it yet-Anyway I'm Always remembering to NTAP

Favourite strings - Please don't respond (posted in 2002 by OBobGold)
http://www.msnusers.com/FreedomFromToba ... 3577115039

fernanda lopes
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 15th, 2006, 4:57 am #95

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 20th, 2006, 4:24 am #96

Message #25 from John:

That next crave can't hurt you and it won't make you bleed!
It won't last longer than it took to smoke a cigarette!
Relax, embrace it, and say goodbye to your needless fears!
Patience!
This isn't what it feels like to be a comfortable ex-smoker.
This is what it feels like to say goodbye to your former master!
Smile! The calmness ahead is permanent and deep!
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 21st, 2006, 9:29 pm #97

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

May 5th, 2006, 8:52 pm #98

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

May 8th, 2006, 9:36 pm #99

See each crave episode as
the true healing it reflects
Encountering and working through craves should be seen as a welcome and very necessary part of recovery. They are a sign of true healing. There's no need to fear getting better. Crave anxieties can flow from subconscious expectations conditioning or simple conscious fixation. One you get good at riding and the other you explore.

The beauty of encountering a subconscious feeding cue is that it is always less than three minutes in duration unless of course you decide to tag conscious fixation to the end. But for some unknown reason the subconscious mind does not persist beyond three minutes if it does not obtain the expected result - more nicotine. Better yet, in most cases your subconscious breaks the association between the triggering event or cue and your brain's anxiety generator with a single encounter.

(Excerpted from John's post #91 above)
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

May 12th, 2006, 8:54 pm #100

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