JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

July 31st, 2008, 10:05 pm #176

From Bob's original:
We make this transition by getting back to the fundamentals that got us to this point.

Honesty
--Was smoking really a part of my identity? Did it define, in part, who I am? Or, was smoking a way to relieve the discomfort of nicotine withdrawal every half-hour or so?

--Are my memories of smoking drifting toward the "ahh" cigarette, and neglecting all the other, mindlessly smoked ones, forced into the cold to poison myself, late-night runs to the liquor store to spend hard-earned money on a fix, staining my fingers and teeth, making me reek, giving my children scratchy throats, turning colds into bronchitis, threatening me with early death and disfigurement with every puff?

--If I smoked today, how would I truly feel tonight? Tomorrow? Next year... Ponder it for a bit. Envision yourself back on the other side of the line, looking back across it at yourself now. Picture yourself with the stick in your mouth, inhaling, knowing the full-measure of what that cigarette was doing to you. Question whether you'd rather be reminiscing about the odd "ahh" cigarette once in a while, or be reminiscing about the few weeks/months of comfort you achieved when you quit.

--Remind yourself that there is no such thing as one, and extrapolate it out over the years. Shine the light of truth on it. Have a look around at elderly smokers (the ones who've made it to old age). Put yourself in their shoes. Remember which side of the line you're on. Remind yourself why you chose this side of the line.... why you want to stay on this side.

One day at a time
Permanence is frightening. But, it's achievable in small doses. Just because you're an "experienced quitter" doesn't mean the basic principles change. Today is doable. The next hour is doable.
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

August 29th, 2008, 6:24 am #177

From: John (Gold) Sent: 4/23/2003 9:17 AM
Whether the next few minutes are your easiest yet or
in the end prove to have been the most challenging
of your entire journey of adjustment, they will be doable!
Be patient with your recovery!
You're going home!
Quote
Like
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 14th, 2008, 10:29 pm #178

From O'Bob:

Honesty
--Was smoking really a part of my identity? Did it define, in part, who I am? Or, was smoking a way to relieve the discomfort of nicotine withdrawal every half-hour or so?

--Are my memories of smoking drifting toward the "ahh" cigarette, and neglecting all the other, mindlessly smoked ones, forced into the cold to poison myself, late-night runs to the liquor store to spend hard-earned money on a fix, staining my fingers and teeth, making me reek, giving my children scratchy throats, turning colds into bronchitis, threatening me with early death and disfigurement with every puff?

--If I smoked today, how would I truly feel tonight? Tomorrow? Next year... Ponder it for a bit. Envision yourself back on the other side of the line, looking back across it at yourself now. Picture yourself with the stick in your mouth, inhaling, knowing the full-measure of what that cigarette was doing to you. Question whether you'd rather be reminiscing about the odd "ahh" cigarette once in a while, or be reminiscing about the few weeks/months of comfort you achieved when you quit.

--Remind yourself that there is no such thing as one, and extrapolate it out over the years. Shine the light of truth on it. Have a look around at elderly smokers (the ones who've made it to old age). Put yourself in their shoes. Remember which side of the line you're on. Remind yourself why you chose this side of the line.... why you want to stay on this side.

One day at a time
Permanence is frightening. But, it's achievable in small doses. Just because you're an "experienced quitter" doesn't mean the basic principles change. Today is doable. The next hour is doable.

Never stop celebrating
Quitting smoking is a tremendous gift you've given yourself. Unlike many other gifts, this one should never lose its luster over time. In fact, the opposite is true. Over time, this gift becomes more important, more impactful..... Measure it in terms of health, self-esteem, life, freedom..... but MEASURE IT. Celebrate every day of this gift. You've earned it.

Acceptance is an Embrace
Finally, don't simply accept your new status -- "ex-smoker"; Embrace it. Sit down and look at it honestly. Compare this new identity to the old one (whatever label you want to attach to what you were when you smoked.... I was a slave). Separate yourself for a minute, and observe the 2 "yous" as an impartial 3rd party. Look them over thoroughly. Which do you want for yourself? Choose one. And, then, embrace it. Life will go on, there will be good days, and bad days. Terrible sadness, and joyous elation. Regardless what life is bringing you at the moment, embrace this thing that is only positive. Embrace your decision for life.

Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 24th, 2008, 11:57 am #179

From Bob's original:
"We question a future where celebrations and defeats, excitement and boredom are experienced without the presence of the powerful drug to which we were actively addicted for years. We question our mettle. We've made it this far, and we've proven to ourselves that it's doable. But, now we're playing for keeps. This is for good. This is permanent. Can we imagine the rest of our life as an ex-smoker?"

Brings to mind a line From a post by John - See yourself an ex-smoker and an ex-smoker you will be. - Using attitude to reduce anxiety
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 25th, 2008, 11:31 pm #180

Quote
Share

OBob Gold
OBob Gold

January 6th, 2009, 11:12 am #181

Bumped for AJM.

Quote
Share