Turkey's Triumphs - an invite to Goldies

Turkey's Triumphs - an invite to Goldies

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 12th, 2005, 1:59 am #1

Turkey's Triumphs
Freedom Goldies Invited to Inspire All Internet Quitters

Over at www.WhyQuit.com I've put up a new page entitled Turkey's Triumphs, in which cold turkey quitters who've quit for 1 year or longer are invited to share a motivational message with our sisters and brothers still in bondage or new quitters just starting out.

As stated on the page, the objective is in counter-marketing the pharmaceutical industry message that it's almost impossible to quit smoking cold turkey and that few succeed.

WhyQuit gets visited daily by thousands of smokers and quitters from across the Internet, many of whom may shy away from an online support group such as ours but might just click upon a link over on the motivational side of WhyQuit. If so, I'd like their greeting to be every bit as inspiring as having a couple of can-do Freedom Goldies staring them in the face.

If any of you Goldies feel inclined to inspire I'd love to share it. Also if you have any ideas on ways the page might be improved I'm all ears. Keep in mind that we're not trying to sell them on "Freedom" but the bigger picture, freedom!

Also, a few of us have been pondering a victim's page much like the ALA's old Wall of Remembrance page before the format was altered , but are still having trouble coming up with a suitable name and appropriate layout. Again, any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated. If you'd like to e-mail me I can be reached at [url=mailto:john@whyquit.com]john@whyquit.com[/url] Sincere thanks. John (Gold x5)
Share your victory
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 13th, 2005, 2:20 am #2

Thanks to each of you who've shared your message!
John (Gold x5)
Quote
Share

Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

February 13th, 2005, 3:09 am #3

John, I know I am not an Oldie ... well, at least not yet in the Freedom world, but I would just like to let you know that I absolutely love the Turkey's Triumph site. Had a look at it yesterday and today ... the layout is great and so is the background music. What can I say? One of my all time favourites ... can hear Eva Cassidy in my head.
Thanks again -- I will definitely be back and read many more inspiring golden Oldie stories.

Gitte
78 days and a bit
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 14th, 2005, 7:48 am #4

Thanks Gitte. It's still a work in progress. I went back and added a couple of images and quotes at the bottom that seemed to fit well with the tune, including the image above. Just one day at a time, we have every expectation that we'll soon be sharing your message too : )
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 15th, 2005, 12:33 am #5

Again, thank you Goldies : )
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 16th, 2005, 4:31 am #6


Thanks again to all who've shared a message. There's some fantastic ones. If you have not yet had a chance to put your thoughts together there's absolutely no need to rush as we hope to be here for many years to come.

It is my hope that the page will eventually become a unifying statment by long-term cold turkey quitters around the globe, be they message board forum quitters or wonderful lurkers from here at Freedom or any other messageboard, or those who quit without using the Internet. Thank you Freedom!

John (Gold x5)
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 18th, 2005, 12:12 am #7

Quote
Share

GoldenDivamom1972
GoldenDivamom1972

February 19th, 2005, 11:24 am #8

John:

This is a great page you've put together! I loved reading about the man who quit back in 1964. That must have been around the time the first Surgeon General's report about smoking and lung cancer came out.

I would like to tell my dad about this page, and encourage him to put his story there. He quit CT in 1982, and has never looked back, and I think it would be encouraging to lurkers and newbies.

Amy (in Michigan)
Free and Healing for One Month, Sixteen Days, 16 Hours and 24 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 4 Days and 20 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1401 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $350.80.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 19th, 2005, 12:27 pm #9


That would be fantastic, Amy! I'll try to get my dad to do the same but no promises as he's pretty shy : )
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 22nd, 2005, 7:45 pm #10

I noticed we had a few people who just stopped by because it was there quit anniversary. I thought it would be a good idea for them to see this in case they wanted to add in comments to the Triumph Page at www.whyquit.com.
Quote
Share

TOM DPLN1 GOLD
TOM DPLN1 GOLD

March 9th, 2005, 10:02 pm #11

fellow Goldbies, Share your story, you just may save a life.
Quote
Share

TOM DPLN1 GOLD
TOM DPLN1 GOLD

March 17th, 2005, 10:50 pm #12

Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

March 24th, 2005, 9:58 am #13

I've received a few e-mails from excited readers who jumped the gun a bit as they were not yet at the one year mark. Although not quite ripe for WhyQuit's Turkey's Triumphs page I'm letting them know that I'm going to start sharing them here. It just seems like such a waste not to share their excitement and victory. This is the latest. It's from Serena


March 23, 2005

I am an official "lurker." I know it's too late to join but I do get all of the free education that I rely on and love. I am 36 years old and started smoking on my 13th birthday.

I want to share that with the help of all of the information I have received from this website I am almost 6 months quit. I know to NTAP. I have been bragging to everyone I know about this group and my co-worker's husband finally quit 4 months ago using the website. He never joined either. I am certain there are so many you touch and help quit and most importantly, stay quit, that you are never made aware of.


My longest previous quit was one year but I was not educated and pulled the "just while I'm on vacation with the girls" smokes. I did stay on and off for another year before I went back full-time to my 1 & 1.2 - 2 packs a day. That was 8 years ago. Wow.

Well, now I am no longer an "in the closet" smoker and this freedom to be honest in every way is very empowering. I always worked out even when smoking, but now, forgettaboudit! I am doing Japanese sword training, karate, kickboxing and spinning classes and I love, love, love how much I can breath.

Well, thought I'd type a note and share. Oh yeah, I did gain 10lbs for my chocolate indulgences but cut that out a month ago. Now I've lost 14lbs so I weigh less now then when I quit!

Thank you.
Thanks you for giving me back my integrity, my self confidence, my breath, my life. I can't say enough.

Warm regards,
Serena x

Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 1st, 2005, 10:38 pm #14

02/10/05 I am 74 years old and I quit smoking at 5 PM on June 17, 1964. How do I remember the date? It was the day before my 9th wedding anniversary. I quit almost cold turkey just using four of the old time Bantron tablets. They made the cigarettes taste like horse manure. Now I tell people the only way to quit is like I did. I tell them it is a sure fire way of quitting. A 100% success rate. That is an individual just does not light up another cigarette. If a person does not light up the the end of a cigarette it can't burn nor can they inhale. End of story. I had smoked for 14 years and had tried to quit 3 or 4 times before. By the way, I just finished walking 4 miles today.

Dennis Reuss

Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 8th, 2005, 2:23 am #15

23 02/25/05 Hello! Today is my one year anniversary of having stopped smoking after just over 20 years. I know it's been said over and over but I never thought I could do it and be this successful. It was just plain exhilarating (and still is) to be free of this heinous addiction. Like many people out there, I too have tried a number of times but now feel down to my very bones this quit is the one that will 'stick'.

I've often read the WhyQuit disclaimer that said: "WhyQuit is staffed and its materials authored by professional cessation counselors who are not medically trained physicians. WhyQuit's information is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a site visitor and his/her physician. Do not rely upon any information at this site to replace individual consultations with your doctor or other qualified health care provider."

I understand why it's there and why you have to post it, but I have to tell you that it's because of whyquit.com and other sites like this that are devoted to helping us stay quit that I attribute my success. Sadly, although my doctor always encouraged me to quit, beyond offering to write prescriptions, I never had the education, tools and resources that sites like whyquit.com offered.

I know I will continue to need to care for my quit and never backslide or become arrogant that I could have another smoke, for the rest of my life. Interesting because it doesn't feel like a battle or something I 'gave up' any more. Now it feels like one of the best gift I've ever received. Thanks for saving my life.

Gratefully,

[url=mailto:bellbell@charter.net]Bell[/url]
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 1st, 2005, 1:58 am #16

35 04/27/05 I started smoking when I was fourteen years old. It was the night they rushed my father to the hospital because he was having a heart attack. His heart stopped three times that night and he was forced to quit smoking. He told me that he wanted to **** the nicotine off the fingers of the nurses who smelled of smoke after their breaks. Somehow I came to reason with God that I would start smoking if he let my father live. How the mind of a fourteen year old works!

My mother died a couple of years after I graduated from college. Diagnosed with liver cancer, she had to have a lung removed earlier due to lung cancer. She quit smoking in her early forties but was now in her late forties. It was during my senior year in high school. I walked into her hospital room just as the doctor told her she probably only had two months to live. We cried with each other for about fifteen minutes. Just before she died I brought home a girl whom I just started dating. She told me later that she did not want to jinx it but that she thought that she just met my future wife and her deepest regret was that she would be there for my children.

I quit once before about four years ago for a year but had to add my name to the one puff files. My father had dementia and his brother who was a priest living in nearby city got cancer. Both died relatively close to each other. After one of the wakes I walked outside and smoked a cigarette with my brother, then believing it would help me through the situation. Back to another 30 plus Merit Longs a day.

I promised my kids that I would try again. I did try a few times but could not see myself without smoking. I wanted to quit but after several failed attempts I did not think I could. I thought I was destined to continue my 35 years of smoking until death. I made promises to my kids that I would try after tax season ( I am a CPA). On April 16, 2004, after tax season my boys asked me, "now that tax season is over when are you going to quit?" I quit on April 19th and that quit only lasted two days, maybe two and a half, before I broke down and purchased a pack. I made that pack last three days. My wife smokes and the boys are harder on her then me. They said to her, "at least dad tries to quit," after my last failed attempt. She always said we could not quit together because we would kill each other.

Ashamed that I failed in my last quit attempt, angry that I ever started to smoke, embarrassed to have to leave my son's basketball game at halftime to smoke, disgusted that I coached basketball while smoking, mad that I allowed myself, my government, and the tobacco companies to make me a slave, scared from when I went to the heart doctor for a stress test that he said to me that "chances are that if both you and your wife continue to smoke that something bad is likely to happen to one of you during the next five years." My daughter was only entering the eighth grade and my sons were entering their senior year of high school and the other a sophomore year in college. On April 26, 2004 I smoked my last cigarette. I did so hopefully my kids would not have watch me suffer or worry during their own development.

I am so proud of my quit. I'm thankful to WhyQuit.com, and the managers and members of Freedom from Tobacco (where I lurked as a non-member) for helping me save my life. Thank you! Thank you! My wife and several people I know have quit or are in the process of quitting because of WhyQuit. When they ask me how I quit I respond with a question do you have a computer. I explain about WhyQuitm and will actually go to the web page on their computer to give them a tour. Before I sign off their computer I add WhyQuit.com to their Favorites and encourage them to return and explore the site when they have some free time.

Today I'm forty-nine years old, have a wonderful beautiful non-smoking wife and three children ages 13, 18. and 20. It has been one year and one day since I ingested nicotine into my body. I've saved $3,167.14 while not smoking 10,997 cigarettes. For you new quitters, please believe me when I say peace and comfort will come. Breathe deep, live long, love strong, hug long, and be FREE by Never, Never, Taking Another Puff.

You will find peace and freedom just give it chance by NTAP. Repeat after me, I do believe, I do believe, I do believe! You will be there before you even realize that you are there!

[url=mailto:walter.cain@verizon.net]Walter F. Cain[/url]
Webster, Massachusetts, USA
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

June 1st, 2005, 10:54 am #17

40 05/15/05 Six years ago today - the evening of May 15, 1999 - I said "no more!" Tempered by a dozen prior serious failed attempts and frightened by the prospect of withdrawal, what I most feared was success. Smoking had so infected every aspect of my being that I simply couldn't imagine life without it being worth living. Ohhhhhh, how wonderfully wrong I was.

One thing was different this time. In April 1999, I at last surrendered to the fact that I was a true drug addict, every bit as chemically dependent as any alcoholic. After thirty years of games in attempting to control the uncontrollable, of treating an addiction like a habit, I now, for the first time, willingly admitted that I would never ever be stronger than nicotine. The games were over. But if not stronger, then what?

On May 13, 1999, I discovered the beauty of "can-do" encouragement flowing from online support, on June 16th I read Bryan's story and felt the positive influence of horrible truths, and on January 20, 2000, I was introduced to Joel's Library and almost immediately recognized a vast void in my dependency understanding.

Remember the end of the movie Ghost, where Patrick tells Demi that "the love in your heart, you get to take it with you?" Well recovery is the same. Although it may feel like it during the first two weeks, we leave absolutely nothing behind. Every neurochemical that nicotine released -- more than 200 -- already belonged to you. Recovery is a matter of giving our brain time to re-sensitize itself, and us time to again appreciate engaging every aspect of life without nicotine.

If you have not yet done so, I'd strongly encourage a one time cover to cover read of Joel's Library. Also, I'd find a quality source of ongoing support - a calm and comfortable ex-smoker, a non-smoking loved one or a serious and highly focused online support forum. Just one guiding principle determining the outcome for all, a principle that will always remain our common bond ... no nicotine just one day at a time, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew. As with all who've posted here, if you need help, or have a question, e-mail us. We're each here and we're with you in spirit. The next few minutes are all that matter and each is do-able.

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!

[url=mailto:john@whyquit.com]John R. Polito[/url] (a/k/a Zep)(Gold x6)
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Quote
Share

Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

June 25th, 2005, 5:36 pm #18

Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 13th, 2005, 7:48 pm #19

45 07/12/05 Hello, my name is Tommy and I quit 1 year ago today (12 July 04).Many thanks to God and WhyQuit.com. I had tried every possible quitting method during the last few years, but never tried the educated cold turkey method as described here at WhyQuit.

The beginning was difficult and I my eyes were glued to this site for the first few weeks - continually educating myself and reaffirming my promise to keep my quit. The real life tragedies, photographs and suffering that I saw posted on this site was a real wake up call for me. I read from people that really opened their hearts and emotions about how this dreadful addiction had affected their lives and their families. Then I read about the success stories, ordinary people beating this addiction and gaining control of their lives again, and I believed that I could be one of this team also!...and it worked!

This site should be on the school education curriculum for teenagers to help them quit/not begin and prevent them having a life of guilt and worry as most of us (former smokers) have had.

Since I quit I now have 3000% more energy. I now enjoy my sports again. I met a beautiful lady and married her. I lived in a European city and my country banned smoking last year in all bars, restaurants, etc, so quitting was relatively easy because the "triggers" were greatly reduced!

This year my employer relocated me to Moscow, Russia - a very interesting and historical city. Everybody smokes here - it is frightening to see how addicted to cigarettes most of the population is. There is cigarette bill-board advertising, magazines etc. This has been outlawed in Europe for many years, so it is a big culture shock. Museums, outdoor events etc list major tobacco companies as their main sponsors...wow! The prices of cigarettes are very cheap and as a result everyone smokes, in restaurants, bars, work etc. These are the new markets for the big tobacco companies - Russia,China and Asia.

The amazing thing about all of this is that since I quit and everyone that I work with now in Moscow is smoking all around me.... I have no cravings. I do not want to smoke and I pity these people and their terrible addiction. I actually find it funny because most of the time I cannot remember smoking and cannot imagine myself smoking (and I smoked for over 20+ years!!!)

Indelibly etched in my mind is NTAP...never take another puff. This promise/oath is so important to me and my health. Quitting smoking has been the greatest achievement of my life and I am proud of this. I hope that this short letter will give some encouragement to anyone out there that is worried about quitting or is thinking about resuming their smoking career. Please quit one day at a time... I did ... and it gets really easy later!

Many thanks to Joel, Kim and Whyquit.com...you saved my life.

Tommy

  • Turkey's Triumphs - Current
  • Turkey's Triumps - Page 2
  • Turkey's Triumps - Page 1
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 30th, 2005, 1:23 am #20

#46

07/14/05

Free for 2 years, 9 months and counting!

I'm not ashamed to admit that I needed help to quit but like most people I thought that help came in the form of a patch or a pill. Then I found this site. Because of the knowledge provided by John and Joel I was able to break free and most importantly stay free. No gimmicks, no tricks, no hidden agendas. WhyQuit is staffed and frequented by people who genuinely care about saving your life.

If you're still smoking and thinking about quitting or you want to quit but are afraid to fail then picture this: in your mind imagine total comfort, your life free of cigarettes, free of craving, maybe you can imagine your life before you started smoking. If you could achieve that image wouldn't you make the effort? I did, and I'm living my smokefree life every day and loving it.

Jill
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 3rd, 2005, 10:34 pm #21

#47

08/03/05

During the last ten or so of my 30 years of smoking, I tried to quit literally countless times with patch or gum -- in fact they became almost interchangeable with cigarettes. Of course those devices didn't work because I wasn't quitting the most addictive substance on earth -- nicotine -- I was actually feeding that addiction. There is only one way to quit nicotine and that is to never intake nicotine. All the information and support needed is at WhyQuit.com. It saved my life. I am 100% certain that I will never smoke again.

Amber
Nearly 15 months free!
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 12th, 2005, 7:01 am #22

#50

08/10/05

John, I never joined Freedom or posted any messages. I lurked and read (and read & read). Regardless of Peter Jennings and what could happen to any of us, I will never smoke again. Sincere thanks to you, Joel and everyone associated with Freedom & WhyQuit. Below is my email to Keith Olbermann, MSNBC - written today.

Cheryl

[Editor's Note: Keith Olbermann, a 27 year pipe smoker, just had a tumor removed from his mouth. Click the above link to read his story.]

-------------------

Keith,

I am almost 55 years old and started smoking in my late teens - until I was up to a pack or more a day. I quit May 2, 2004, as required by my doctor prior to cosmetic surgery (FULLY intending to start up again after the surgery). Typical of any nicotine addict, I dreaded the quitting much more than the surgery and did considerable research in an attempt to ease the pain.

The method that worked for me was cold turkey with the help of www.whyquit.com. This is a very educational site with a tough love approach and I believe that, had it not been for the knowledge I gained on WhyQuit, I would be smoking today. In the 15+ months since I threw away my last pack of cigarettes, I have not taken one puff - regardless of stress, cocktails or WHATEVER (excuses addicts come up with). I recommended this site to a friend that wanted to quit (after 35 years of smoking) and remarkably, he has not smoked for almost a year.

Keith, PLEASE check out WhyQuit...........after reading your tumor story, I think you will appreciate the "scared straight" climate of this website and admire the volume of information it contains.

Thanks for your effort on this worthy campaign and good luck (and good health) to us all.

Cheryl
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 20th, 2005, 8:59 am #23

#54

08/19/05

Hi there. I have quit for over a year and a half and I am truly happy I made the choice. I smoked for 15 years, a pack a day. First of all we all make mistakes, no shame in it.

I tried everything, patches , gum, pills and it did not work. After my close buddy confronted me and said I should quit because I stink I gave it some thought. I went to quitsmoking.com (http://www.quitsmoking.com/info/article ... pind1.html) and read every article on the webpage. After each article it said "never take another puff again" and that is exactly what I did and am still doing today. I got rid of all my cigarette stuff like packs, lighters and ashtrays and went from there. The first couple of weeks were hard and now I can do it without thinking about it as much. The worst is when there are people in your life that want to keep you the same way and tempting you to smoke. Now I see these phonys a mile away and stay away from them.

You have one life to live. Forget about the past and begin a smoke-free future where it will not only benefit you but all the people in your life as well.

Breathing easier,

Mike Ross
Ontario, Canada
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 20th, 2005, 7:50 pm #24

#55

08/20/05

Hi Folks! I quit smoking cold turkey on March 7th, 2002, the same day as my sister was diagnosed with lung cancer.

My sister also quit cold turkey on March 7th, 2002 and remained nicotine free until she passed away on June 23rd, 2004.

Quitting smoking isn't as hard as you think it is. Educate yourself and understand the Law of Addiction. Education is the key to success and don't wait until something horrible happens to you or your family. It really is a matter of life and death.

Kelly
3 years, 5 months, 12 days
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 22nd, 2005, 1:26 am #25

#56

08/21/05

I started smoking when I was 17 years YOUNG. I knew better because my mother DIED as a result of smoking - she was 35 years YOUNG and had advanced heart disease. She was a 3 pack a day smoker.

Because of my mother's medical history I had been ADMONISHED by every single doctor I ever had to see to stop smoking. Even my gynecologist told me I had to quit.

What did they know? I "enjoyed" smoking, it kept me calm, took the edge off. But really, what did I know? I had no clue that active smoking was the result of nicotine addiction - prior to that I believed it was a "habit". A cardiologist actually told me that I was addicted. I did not believe him. I was 32 at the time, and I knew that all these people were right - I needed to quit smoking. I didn't want to die young. But I didn't know how. Any doctor I ever had to see told me I NEEDED the patch or something to "help". NO ONE ever said "cold turkey." No one in the medical profession ever said "you can do it cold turkey."

I did a Google search for quit smoking. That was how I found WhyQuit. The very first story I read was Noni Glykos' story. I could NOT believe that she was my age and had been died with lung cancer. I kept reading. I could not get enough of this website. Furthermore, I could not believe that REAL PEOPLE WERE QUITTING COLD TURKEY - no pill, no patch, no gum, just QUITTING ON THEIR OWN!!

But I wasn't ready to just quit, to just quit cold turkey? I believed in my mind that I could not do it. I was very envious of their magical powers.

In July of 2003 I quit for 8 days. I had set up myself for failure. I was not believing that I could do it, I could survive. I sold out at day 9 and went back to smoking. I quit again in November 2003 when I had to have major surgery. I lasted for 5 days. I needed my cigarettes!!

In 2004 I came back to WhyQuit, and then I started reading the threads at Freedom from Tobacco. I poured over the long-term quitters threads. I would just sit and cry 'cause I felt like they were special and I was a loser and I just couldn't do it.

But I had decided that no matter what, I was going to do this, and make it. I was going to do what I needed to do. And I was going to survive. I didn't know when, all I knew was that it was going to have to be on my own.

Then on August 17 I felt a wheeze in my back. Not the regular asthma type wheeze but a deep in your lungs wheeze. It scared me so much (think Noni) that I smoked my last cigarette on August 19, 2004 @ 7:42 p.m. I did it cold turkey. I wasn't scared, or nervous or anxious anymore. I just knew that it had to be done. And I was going to make it. I changed my self messages from "I can't" to "I am." From "I won't make it" to "I am healing." The list goes on and on. It's hard to be defeated when you're armed with facts.

I lived at Freedom from Tobacco for the first couple of months. I stayed focused on the messages. Other people who had succeeded were not more special than me, and I was not a loser. We had that one thing in common. We wanted our freedom from nicotine.

It's that simple. I wanted to be free from the fear, the worry, and the cost! I am on the "other side" now. I have been living in comfort for quite a while-and I'm only "1". I do not spend time thinking about smoking, I do not miss it, I do not need it. I never did. Last night was my official birthday and this time when I cried I cried tears of pride.

If you are thinking about quitting, quit wasting your time and just do it. Get educated. Visit WhyQuit. It also helps if you send yourself KIND, LOVING messages about how much you deserve to be free. You will survive. You will not "lose" anything, not even your mind.

Chevet' Mondragon
Quote
Share