GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

May 23rd, 2004, 12:51 am #101

One puff is called "relapse" and relapse has the ablity to change our lives forever. That one puff is capable of causing an illness that will end our lives....sometimes slowly over a long period of time crippling our lifestyles, and if we're lucky, instantly, so there is no suffering. Nicotine kills one of every two users who never quit. Those odds are as high as they come.

Think, before you take that next puff...is it worth risking your life?

Linda
after smoking 41 years, 53 months free.
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Joel
Joel

June 10th, 2004, 1:19 pm #102

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

June 13th, 2004, 3:03 am #103

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Joel
Joel

July 3rd, 2004, 11:16 am #104

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johnny L irish
johnny L irish

July 15th, 2004, 7:51 am #105

This message has been deleted by the author.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

July 31st, 2004, 4:56 am #106

From: John (Gold) Sent: 3/11/2004 2:32 PM


Any member who believes that there is ANY legitimate reason to relapse is missing what this forum stands for. Period! If we put our minds to it we can each find something good or positive to say about the worst the world has to offer, regardless of topic. But why would we?

To yearn for the glory of an addict's addiction is to surrender the glory that's us! We are true drug addicts and anyone who wants to worship their addiction needs to find another place to do so as this isn't the place. The addict may not like the rule but somewhere on planet earth there must be at least one spot where nicotine has no voice.

The streets are filled with dependent, diseased and dying nicotine addicts who'll be more than happy to help you rationalize their self-destruction. Forgive us for not joining the chorus but with 5 million deaths in 2004, a growing number of whom we've known personally, listening to someone romantacize such massive self-destruction makes this stomach feel ill.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

August 13th, 2004, 1:39 pm #107

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

August 14th, 2004, 10:58 am #108

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

August 17th, 2004, 6:32 am #109

I just removed a thread that was on the board that gave 10 reasons to relapse.

Anyone who feels that there is humor in relapsing or the reasons given or any reason to pick up and take a puff, needs to do a quite a bit more reading at Freedom especially the following:

Diversion Thread
Our Courtesies
Have you met Noni yet?
Have you met Bryan?
Kim's Missing Lung

We have many members who are fighting for their lives or have family members fighting for their lives. We also have members who have lost their lives. There is nothing funny about relapse nor is there any legitimate reason to do so.

Linda
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

August 18th, 2004, 2:56 pm #110

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

September 1st, 2004, 3:22 am #111

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Joel
Joel

September 2nd, 2004, 7:12 pm #112

A comment was written about how if some terrible natural or unnatural disaster were to occur a member would not know how he or she could maintain his or her quit. The title of this post says it all. If a natural or unnatural occurs that kills hundreds or even thousands of people on any given day, an individual relapsing is not going to bring back even one of those people.

Also know that if no natural or unnatural disaster happens in the world today, that over 13,000 people worldwide are going to die because of smoking today. The same thing is going to happen tomorrow, and the next day, and the next day, and the next day. Millions of people are going to die prematurely every year for the foreseeable future until the entire population of the world understands that the only way to prevent smoking related deaths is for the entire population of the world to come to the conclusion that to stay smoke free they must never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 2nd, 2004, 7:24 pm #113

I ended up pulling the entire string that was referenced above. There was one post in that string though that I think was worth saving and it fits very well into this string:
From: Kristina Sent: 9/2/2004 5:48 AM
Hi,

I am just a few days from bronze, too. One of the tips that helped in the beginning was "Take it one day at a time."

If you are waiting for a reason to resume your deadly addiction you will find it. But if you are looking for a reason to stay quit you will find that too. The choice is yours.
Smoking Is How You Deal With Stress
"I also entertain thoughts of smoking if there ends up being massive death and destruction in the US" There is massive death and destruction going on right now. It is the effect of smoking, and it is happening all over the world.
Kristina - Free and healing for 89 days.
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Joel
Joel

September 24th, 2004, 11:33 am #114

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

October 14th, 2004, 1:48 am #115

Hi,

I am just a few days from bronze, too. One of the tips that helped in the beginning was "Take it one day at a time."

If you are waiting for a reason to resume your deadly addiction you will find it. But if you are looking for a reason to stay quit you will find that too. The choice is yours.
"I also entertain thoughts of smoking if there ends up being massive death and destruction in the US" There is massive death and destruction going on right now. It is the effect of smoking, and it is happening all over the world.
Kristina - Free and healing for 89 days.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

October 29th, 2004, 6:36 pm #116

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

November 27th, 2004, 12:01 pm #117

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Joel
Joel

December 11th, 2004, 3:51 am #118

I saw the following comment written in a string to a person who lost his job but kept his quit: "Who knows how many of us here would have made it as far as you have in such a difficult circumstance. "

It made me think of this string. Just for the record, every ex-smoker could make it through similar circumstances and even worse conditions (like the death of a loved one) with his or her quit intact as long as he or she remembers to stick to his or her commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Rickrob53 Gold
Rickrob53 Gold

December 11th, 2004, 7:31 am #119

When "junkie thinking" rises up because one of life's crisis has come your way, it's pretty easy for the addict's mind to believe (irrationally) that a cigarette will help them get through the crisis. Look back through the SOS board and you'll see that there have been some posts where those in crisis have thought that smoking a cigarette would help them get through. Fortunately, with the support of Freedom, nearly everyone makes it through without relapsing.

However, it seems to be that when a crisis hits, the junkie thought is centered on just a cigarette… a cigarette… a one time shot. How many of us addicts who have found ourselves having to deal with a life crisis actually think in terms that "I need a carton of cigarettes to get me through this today!" I'll bet not many!

Instead of thinking in terms that a cigarette will help the crisis pass, it should be looked at from the standpoint of asking "will thousands of cigarettes and years more smoking help me get through this crisis today?" Because that's exactly what needs to be asked! It's not a "single cigarette" kind of deal… no matter what the crisis, it's the whole package (thousands of cigarettes and years of smoking) that will need to be dealt with! If the answer is yes, then those addicts who face a crisis know what to do. If you see the absurdity of the answer and say no, then that single cigarette isn't going to be needed.

Richard 10 months, 1 week
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

December 24th, 2004, 3:45 am #120

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 2nd, 2005, 10:59 pm #121

Is death justification for relapse?
If the death of someone we love is a legitimate reason to relapse to smoking nicotine then all of us should expect to again someday find ourselves trading places with our now arrested dependency and again living behind bars. Chemical relapse is not the answer to the death of the person or pet that we love most. It's a moment for the brain's neurochemicals to enter the grieving mode, not a moment to steal an unearned hit of dopamine from the brain's reward pathways.

The brain's neurochemical pathways were not designed to celebrate death. There is no justification for relapse. None!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 8th, 2005, 12:17 am #122


Although you likely arrived here with rational and understandable deep-seated doubts and fears (as almost all of us did), let there be no misunderstanding, we know that the next few minutes are entirely do-able and we have every expectation that you will not use them to destroy your hard work and what is likely the most important period of healing and re-adjustment that your body has ever known! Yes, the damage is deeper than last time (if there was a last time) and there's no telling if you'll ever come this far again. Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John (Gold x5)
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

January 14th, 2005, 6:12 am #123

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

February 17th, 2005, 9:44 am #124

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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

March 15th, 2005, 11:29 pm #125

Is death justification for relapse?
If the death of someone we love is a legitimate reason to relapse to smoking nicotine then all of us should expect to again someday find ourselves trading places with our now arrested dependency and again living behind bars. Chemical relapse is not the answer to the death of the person or pet that we love most. It's a moment for the brain's neurochemicals to enter the grieving mode, not a moment to steal an unearned hit of dopamine from the brain's reward pathways.

The brain's neurochemical pathways were not designed to celebrate death. There is no justification for relapse. None!
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