Joel
Joel

June 3rd, 2002, 11:44 pm #11

Can you scare a person out of an addiction? Maybe. Can you educate a person to the scary consequences of the addiction and arm them with the information that they then need to keep a healthy fear of the addiction and more importantly, a deeper appreciation of the many benefits of being smoke free thus allowing them to sustain their quits? Well ask every gold, silver, bronze, and green member here. They are all living proof to the ability of individuals to make a goal and then to stick with the commitment over time to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

October 15th, 2002, 8:49 pm #12

In the 15th post in the string Marketing WhyQuit, Joel's Library & Freedom there is a touching story of a mother's utilizing of www.WhyQuit.com in an effort to start to undo the influence of a person smoking on television on her four year old daughter. I thought it would tie into this string very well.

Joel
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Joel
Joel

April 3rd, 2003, 8:23 am #13

For Alex's professor. Although in all honesty, I don't expect him to buy it. When it comes to answering the question on his test, the right answer is don't use scare tactics. When it comes to teaching kids you are really concerned with, don't use scare tactics either--use honesty and show smoking for what it is. The truth is scary--not knowing the truth is horrifying for it can end up costing the person his or her life. The truth is to stay smoke free you had better give kids and yourself really good reasons to never take another puff! Joel
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Cindy20 Bronze
Cindy20 Bronze

April 4th, 2003, 11:18 am #14

Thanks,
Cindy20
2m13d
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Joel
Joel

May 28th, 2003, 7:14 pm #15

I saw the comment come up that more money was needed for education to help prevent kids from taking up smoking. Money is only part of an answer. You can throw billions into an educational campaign but if your material has no real content giving kids a compelling reason not to smoke peer pressure and other factors may very well win out. Spell out what addiction is and what the long-terms costs of the becoming a nicotine addict will be and kids will have a good reason before they ever start to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 16th, 2003, 7:20 pm #16

A few puffs enough to addict teens to smoking, new Canadian Cancer Society research suggests
MONTREAL, Sept. 15 /CNW/ - Smoking just one or two cigarettes may be all it takes for some adolescents to become addicted to nicotine, says a new study funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. This research, the first of its kind in Canada, is published in the current issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
"This is a huge warning to kids and parents about the real danger of putting that first cigarette into your mouth," says Canadian Cancer Society researcher Dr. Jennifer O'Loughlin.

In a study involving more than 1,200 Montreal high school students, O'Loughlin and her research team found that even teens who smoked only once or twice reported symptoms of nicotine dependence. Up to one-third report some of the more common symptoms of nicotine dependence including "difficulty not smoking when friends smoke" and "feeling a real need to smoke."

The study also found that girls consistently reported more symptoms of addiction than boys, even though they smoked a similar amount of cigarettes. Furthermore, nicotine dependence may be a stronger factor in why teens start smoking than the fact that their friends and family members smoke.

"This is important news because it challenges the current idea that it takes kids two to three years of daily smoking to develop nicotine dependence," says O'Loughlin, a researcher at McGill University and the Direction de la santé publique in Montreal-Centre.

O'Loughlin has been following the Montreal teens for four years. Her research team used questionnaires to measure their smoking patterns and nicotine dependence including withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

This work is the first part of a six-year study that will examine both genetic and environmental factors involved in nicotine dependence in kids.

O'Loughlin says more investigation is required during the remaining two years of her study, but she's confident her findings provide strong evidence of the major role nicotine dependence plays in the smoking onset process for adolescents.

"It's further proof that when it comes to kids, you can't start prevention education or cessation programs early enough."

Cheryl Moyer, Director of Cancer Control Programs for the Canadian Cancer Society, adds, "This research demonstrates why the stop-smoking message doesn't always get through to teens who have started smoking. Their physical addiction can be a stronger influence than peer pressure. This will be a great help in developing more effective smoking cessation programs for kids."

Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in Canada. In 2002, 22 per cent of teens aged 15-19 reported themselves as smokers. Sixteen percent were daily smokers while six per cent were occasional smokers. Slightly more teen girls reported smoking than boys - 23 per cent vs. 21 per cent.

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is to eradicate cancer and to enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer. The Canadian Cancer Society is the largest charitable funder of cancer research in Canada. Excellent research is funded through a rigorous national review process managed by its research partner, the National Cancer Institute of Canada.
The above news story has important implications. First it shows the importance of educating kids and their parents to the addictive nature nicotine. No parent should ever think of experimentation with cigarettes as a normal and harmless right of passage and no kid should knock around the idea that "just one" can't hurt. Also, it shows how important it is to make the message being taught more than a simple message of just saying no. We better be giving the next generation a real good reason to say no. What reason is better than if you experiment with nicotine that you are going to become addicted and that addiction will end up costing you tens of thousands of dollars over a lifetime, your health and eventually your life? More relevant for our members though is this research is showing the addictive potential of nicotine. If just one cigarette has the potential of starting the addictive process in a child who had no previous first hand exposure to smoking, think about what it will do to a person who has years or decades of a past smoking history. Many of our members already know from first hand experience what "just one" puff did to what were previous long-term quits.

The message for kids who have never smoked and adults who have long smoking histories needs to be the same. To never get caught in the grip of an active nicotine addiction it is imperative that everyone understands that the only way to guarantee that a person can stay smoke free is for that person to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

October 8th, 2003, 10:21 pm #17

One of our new members was hoping to send his non-smoking daughter on in to look over Freedom to help encourage her to stay smoke free. I suggested that WhyQuit.com would be a better resource to help in this goal. WhyQuit is not a site designed to scare--it is a site designed to educate. Showing smoking in its true form is scary, showing it in any other way is misleading the reader. Cigarettes are addictive and deadly and the only way to avoid falling into its destructive grip is by knowing that for a person to guarantee that he or she will stay smoke free forever is for that person to stick to his or her commitment to never take another puff! Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 3rd, 2004, 7:52 pm #18

Can you scare a person out of an addiction? Maybe. Can you educate a person to the scary consequences of the addiction and arm them with the information that they then need to keep a healthy fear of the addiction and more importantly, a deeper appreciation of the many benefits of being smoke free thus allowing them to sustain their quits? Well ask every gold, silver, bronze, and green member here. They are all living proof to the ability of individuals to make a goal and then to stick with the commitment over time to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joannetta
Joannetta

September 4th, 2004, 10:03 am #19

Freedom has given me a legitimate and honest view of nicotine addiction. It's not about the difficulties of not smoking, it's about the doom of smoking (or having any relationship with nicotine).
Just last evening after my visit to Freedom I realized how much I fear the coming of a crave and how much I fear that I will encounter something that I just can't conceive of yet that will undermine my quit. This is the next stage of leaving a nicotine addiction I guess. While I do not like feeling afraid, I believe that it will pass too.
I received a nice little boost today. I was reading something that reminded me of smoking dreams and I realized that I had a smoking dream last night - and I couldn't even remember it. All I know is that I DIDN'T TAKE A PUFF! What a really nifty feeling that I can have a smoking dream and not need to remember it! Or, I was having a senior's moment!


Cheers and thanks Freedom Folks, Joanne - 1 day and MINUTES away from G2
Last edited by Joannetta on April 3rd, 2009, 12:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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victoria4504d
victoria4504d

January 26th, 2005, 1:45 pm #20

There are days that I can't remember what I did 10 minutes ago, but I still remember my first cigarette some 30 plus years ago...and I remember thinking it tasted terrible but that I wanted to keep trying because I liked it anyway. I was hooked within a week...only at the time I didn't think of it as addition, I thought of it as attractive! I was 15 years old. YUCK!!

Vicky
I have not smoked a "you know what" since 8/19/2004 amounting to 5 Months, 6 Days, 8 hours, 52 minutes and 57 seconds (159 days). I have saved an amazing $1,482.12 by not smoking 9,562 death sticks and have saved 1 Month, 2 Days, 4 hours and 50 minutes of my life.
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GoldenDivamom1972
GoldenDivamom1972

March 24th, 2005, 11:48 am #21

When I was in the initial stages of my quit, and practically living on Why Quit, I showed my daughters all sorts of pictures of the diseased lungs, hearts, gums, and other nasty bits. All they could say was "EEEEEWWWWW!!!!" I hope they remember that "Ew" feeling before they try to give themselves the false "Aah" feeling.

Amy
Free and Healing for Two Months, Eighteen Days, 16 Hours and 47 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 8 Days and 7 Hours, by avoiding the use of 2391 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $599.71.
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Joel
Joel

June 25th, 2005, 8:15 pm #22

From: Joel Sent: 9/16/2003 6:20 AM
A few puffs enough to addict teens to smoking, new Canadian Cancer Society research suggests
MONTREAL, Sept. 15 /CNW/ - Smoking just one or two cigarettes may be all it takes for some adolescents to become addicted to nicotine, says a new study funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. This research, the first of its kind in Canada, is published in the current issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
"This is a huge warning to kids and parents about the real danger of putting that first cigarette into your mouth," says Canadian Cancer Society researcher Dr. Jennifer O'Loughlin.

In a study involving more than 1,200 Montreal high school students, O'Loughlin and her research team found that even teens who smoked only once or twice reported symptoms of nicotine dependence. Up to one-third report some of the more common symptoms of nicotine dependence including "difficulty not smoking when friends smoke" and "feeling a real need to smoke."

The study also found that girls consistently reported more symptoms of addiction than boys, even though they smoked a similar amount of cigarettes. Furthermore, nicotine dependence may be a stronger factor in why teens start smoking than the fact that their friends and family members smoke.

"This is important news because it challenges the current idea that it takes kids two to three years of daily smoking to develop nicotine dependence," says O'Loughlin, a researcher at McGill University and the Direction de la santé publique in Montreal-Centre.

O'Loughlin has been following the Montreal teens for four years. Her research team used questionnaires to measure their smoking patterns and nicotine dependence including withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

This work is the first part of a six-year study that will examine both genetic and environmental factors involved in nicotine dependence in kids.

O'Loughlin says more investigation is required during the remaining two years of her study, but she's confident her findings provide strong evidence of the major role nicotine dependence plays in the smoking onset process for adolescents.

"It's further proof that when it comes to kids, you can't start prevention education or cessation programs early enough."

Cheryl Moyer, Director of Cancer Control Programs for the Canadian Cancer Society, adds, "This research demonstrates why the stop-smoking message doesn't always get through to teens who have started smoking. Their physical addiction can be a stronger influence than peer pressure. This will be a great help in developing more effective smoking cessation programs for kids."

Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in Canada. In 2002, 22 per cent of teens aged 15-19 reported themselves as smokers. Sixteen percent were daily smokers while six per cent were occasional smokers. Slightly more teen girls reported smoking than boys - 23 per cent vs. 21 per cent.

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is to eradicate cancer and to enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer. The Canadian Cancer Society is the largest charitable funder of cancer research in Canada. Excellent research is funded through a rigorous national review process managed by its research partner, the National Cancer Institute of Canada.

The above news story has important implications. First it shows the importance of educating kids and their parents to the addictive nature nicotine. No parent should ever think of experimentation with cigarettes as a normal and harmless right of passage and no kid should knock around the idea that "just one" can't hurt. Also, it shows how important it is to make the message being taught more than a simple message of just saying no. We better be giving the next generation a real good reason to say no. What reason is better than if you experiment with nicotine that you are going to become addicted and that addiction will end up costing you tens of thousands of dollars over a lifetime, your health and eventually your life? More relevant for our members though is this research is showing the addictive potential of nicotine. If just one cigarette has the potential of starting the addictive process in a child who had no previous first hand exposure to smoking, think about what it will do to a person who has years or decades of a past smoking history. Many of our members already know from first hand experience what "just one" puff did to what were previous long-term quits.

The message for kids who have never smoked and adults who have long smoking histories needs to be the same. To never get caught in the grip of an active nicotine addiction it is imperative that everyone understands that the only way to guarantee that a person can stay smoke free is for that person to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

June 29th, 2005, 10:22 pm #23

I saw the use of the term "scare tactic" on the board. We go out of our way to make sure not to exaggerate any risks of smoking. The risks we point out are real. The risks of a puff leading you back to smoking are real and significant, and the risk of losing your health and eventually your life prematurely if you do relapse are real too. The way to mininize all of the dangers posed by your addiction is to simply continue to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 9th, 2005, 5:52 am #24

Can you scare a person into taking control over an addiction? Maybe. Can you educate a person to the scary consequences of the addiction and arm them with the information that they then need to keep a healthy fear of the addiction and more importantly, a deeper appreciation of the many benefits of being smoke free thus allowing them to sustain their quits? Well ask every gold, silver, bronze, and green member here. They are all living proof to the ability of individuals to make a goal and then to stick with the commitment over time to never take another puff! Joel
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Almost Island Gold
Almost Island Gold

April 22nd, 2006, 3:11 am #25

Unfortunately, even for me that work with teenagers for more than 20 years already the so called scare tactics are enormously difficult to make teens convinced of.

For most of them, thinking of the deadly consequences of smoking is as difficult as making them think of any other aspect of a distant future. I often faced some negative answers of my students such as "if we die of nicotine that only is going to happen in a distant future".
They just don't get it easily and for many of them a cigarette works like a "weapon" of re-ensuring their "place" in one of the two poles of the generation gap.
Nevertheless I'm working against this tendency and won't quit until they find out that it's not that easy to quit (although they say they will quit easily one day).
There are less kids smoking now than in the past (adverts are forbbiden and is not a fashion like onvce upon a time.
As far as teens are concerned I think IT'S NOT THAT SIMPLE unless the governments and officials forbid nicotine.

fernanda lopes
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 12th, 2006, 7:51 am #26

We go out of our way to make sure not to exaggerate any risks of smoking. The risks we point out are real. The risks of a puff leading you back to smoking are real and significant, and the risk of losing your health and eventually your life prematurely if you do relapse are real too. The way to mininize all of the dangers posed by your addiction is to simply continue to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
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Joel
Joel

March 16th, 2007, 3:24 am #27

Can you scare a person into taking control over an addiction? Maybe. Can you educate a person to the scary consequences of the addiction and arm them with the information that they then need to keep a healthy fear of the addiction and more importantly, a deeper appreciation of the many benefits of being smoke free thus allowing them to sustain their quits? Well ask every gold, silver, bronze, and green member here. They are all living proof to the ability of individuals to make a goal and then to stick with the commitment over time to never take another puff! Joel
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