The Urge Hits!

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Crystal View1.ffn
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

05 Feb 2005, 08:18 #41

Thank you John, your thoughts below calmed me and brought me back to the peace I normally feel these days. Knowledge and Understanding are a big solace in my quit most of the time.

For some reason, I "felt" like I wanted to smoke on my way home from work today....caught me off guard....I got weepy....WHY is this still happening to me? I knew exactly what to do as soon as I walked in my door....I did....and I found this string. The words express exactly what I needed to hear....somewhat gentle but BIG TRUTH.

Whew! It's past and now I will proceed....Yeh! It's Friday night!

NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!!!


From: John (Gold)
Sent: 12/7/2004 8:53 AM
If you find yourself experiencing a conscious thought of wanting to smoke nicotine then it is greatly within your ability to control whether you feed and fuel the fire with more "junkey thinking" or use the opportunity for honest reflection and to set the record straight.
  • There are no taste buds inside your lungs and you did not smoke for flavor or taste. You smoked because you had to ... because it hurt when you didn't.
  • Love, like? Compared to what? Do you any remaining memory of what it was like to go your entire day without once wanting for nicotine? Yes, you found yourself smoking lots and lots, and yes, you don't normally do things you don't like to do, but you and I are true drug addicts, addicted to a substance that hooks 6 times more regular users than powdered cocaine (15% vs. 90%).
  • Stress? Wrong! Nicotine is an alkaloid and stress a serious acid producing event within the body. Acids can quickly neutralize alkaloids. What we did was to add the onset of early chemical withdrawal on top of every stressful event life threw our way. Once we replinished our rapidly falling nicotine reserves the flat tire still needed changing. Never once in your life did smoking nicotine remove a stressful event.
If it's a subconsciously triggered crave episode -- encountering a time, place, event or emotion during which you conditioned your subconscious to expect the arrival of a new supply of nicotine -- then it will be less than 3 minutes in duration but be sure at look at a clock as time distortion during early recovery appears to bes an almost universial recovery symptom.

Katie - After 40 Years! Free and Healing for Three Months, Nineteen Days, 10 Hours and 9 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 6 Days and 12 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1877 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $377.15.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 May 2005, 19:34 #42

Image The original article here was based on the fact that we had 33 million ex-smokers in the United States when I first wrote the letter. Today, we have over 46 million, meaning, we have more former smokers than current smokers in the United States today.

Most of these people still get occasional thoughts toward smoking but still remain successfully smoke free. If you ask these people why they don't take one many of them will reply that as much as they want one they do not want the others that would go with the one and then, all of the consequences that go with the others.

To stay in the ranks of those who have successfully became long-term ex-smokers is as simple now as sticking to your own personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

04 Feb 2006, 06:10 #43

If you find yourself experiencing a conscious thought of wanting to smoke nicotine then it is greatly within your ability to control whether you feed and fuel the fire with more "junkey thinking" or use the opportunity for honest reflection and to set the record straight.
  • There are no taste buds inside your lungs and you did not smoke for flavor or taste. You smoked because you had to ... because it hurt when you didn't.
  • Love, like? Compared to what? Do you any remaining memory of what it was like to go your entire day without once wanting for nicotine? Yes, you found yourself smoking lots and lots, and yes, you don't normally do things you don't like to do, but you and I are true drug addicts, addicted to a substance that hooks 6 times more regular users than powdered cocaine (15% vs. 90%).
  • Stress? Wrong! Nicotine is an alkaloid and stress a serious acid producing event within the body. Acids can quickly neutralize alkaloids. What we did was to add the onset of early chemical withdrawal on top of every stressful event life threw our way. Once we replinished our rapidly falling nicotine reserves the flat tire still needed changing. Never once in your life did smoking nicotine remove a stressful event.
If it's a subconsciously triggered crave episode -- encountering a time, place, event or emotion during which you conditioned your subconscious to expect the arrival of a new supply of nicotine -- then it will be less than 3 minutes in duration but be sure at look at a clock as time distortion during early recovery appears to bes an almost universial recovery symptom.
John
Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 May 2006, 19:07 #44

What Urge Thoughts are Troubling You?
An urge to smoke reflects a golden opportunity to correct any rationalizations, minimizations and blame transference bubbling up around it. It's a chance to heal thinking. If you are troubled by a lingering thought, or find yourself challenged by some romantic dependency fixation, tell us about it and let us help you sort through it. It's why we're here. Troubled or not there's still only one rule, no nicotine today!
John (Gold x7)
Last edited by John (Gold) on 02 Apr 2009, 00:01, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Oct 2006, 21:01 #45

An urge to smoke reflects a golden opportunity to correct any rationalizations, minimizations and blame transference bubbling up around it. It's a chance to heal thinking. If you are troubled by a lingering thought, or find yourself challenged by some romantic dependency fixation, tell us about it and let us help you sort through it. It's why we're here. Troubled or not there's still only one rule, no nicotine today!
John (Gold x7z)
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 02 Apr 2009, 00:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Mar 2007, 21:23 #46

For the benefits of newbies wondering if they will ever stop wanting a cigarette, I thought I would elaborate on this one a little. When we say that the urge hits weeks or months or even years after a quit, it is a desire or a thought for a cigarette that is different than the "urge" experienced during initial withdrawal. Those urges are physiological craves, the body demanding nicotine to alleviate a drug withdrawal state.

The thoughts that happened down the road are triggers of fond memories. The thought is often that it seems like a good idea now to smoke a cigarette. Kind of like the urge you get to clean your house on a slow day. Seems like a good idea for a few seconds, but if you find something better to do, so be it. The same concept holds true for the thought of a cigarette.

Other times there will be thoughts of "I used to smoke when I did this." Not a desire for a cigarette or smoking, but a feeling that your timing or ritual is off. Sometimes there may even be a feeling that you are supposed to be doing "something" right now, but do not even realize what it is. All of a sudden you realize you used to smoke at this particular juncture of time or a specific new situation. Again, it is not that you want or need a cigarette in these two cases, just that the routine was a little off.

Years into a quit though, most days ex-smokers will go days, weeks and maybe even months without a thought. Even days which they call "bad" with desires, they may be going 23 hours and 59 minutes and 50 seconds without a thought, but because they think of it once, they think that was a lot. It really does get easier and easier.

The alternative side, smoking, is constantly riddled with thought of quitting. Whenever you are going to a doctor, a non-smoking friends or family home where you want to visit but cannot smoke, getting a new symptoms or aggravated by a chronic problem, read a news headline or hear a news report on television or radio on a new danger from smoking, have to pay another price increase for cigarettes, find another friend who has quit while you do not, stand outside in blizzards or heat waves or torrential downpour for the luxury of getting a quick fix or experience some horrible withdrawal because you can't escape for a cigarette or heaven forbid, you run out of cigarettes.

Yes there were plenty of times smoking made your life totally unmanageable. Not to mention the times that may come where a diagnosis of a horrible condition that require extraordinary measures to save your life that in themselves are almost as terrifying and painful as the disease itself. That unpleasant scenario still provides a chance of survival. There are frequently the cases where the first real symptom of a smoking induced illness is sudden death. Then you don't even have a chance to save your life.

As an ex-smoker, there may be times you want a cigarette. As a smoker, there will be times you want to quit. Neither side is perfect, but the ex-smoker side has clear advantages. It will get easier and easier over time getting to the point of smoking becoming a thing of the past. The smoking side leads to a much more ominous road.

Keep focused, whether it is hours into a quit or decades into a quit. It was a good decision to quit, maybe the most important decision you have made in your life as far as quality and length of your life goes. To keep the decision alive and continue to reap the benefit, always remember, Never Take Another Puff!

Joel
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fbsmith3
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:18

21 Jul 2007, 00:18 #47

I passes my first major milestone. Yesterday on Quit day 12, I had a major stress situation involving, money problems and a care dealer trying to "take advantage" of me.

I really wanted a cigarette more than any time in my life. The stress smoke is the only one I never was able to find a solution for.

Well since I would only smoke Dunhill Cigarettes and I hate all other cigarettes, they are very difficult to get. I got through it because of my snobbery.

Happy to say I'm smoke free on Day 13 ;-).
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Suzi
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Sep 2007, 07:47 #48

I LOVE this post!!! I copied and pasted it into an e-mail which I sent to myself so I have it on my Blackberry to read when I am away from my computer!!! Suzi Image
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elfarsto
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:29

10 Sep 2007, 17:02 #49

I was thinking about this the other day during a slight urge. What I realized was that we've conditioned ourselves to believe the only way to stop that craving is by smoking, because it IS the only way to stop it when you are a smoker. When an active smoker has craving it just keeps getting stronger and stronger until nicotine is ingested, but when an ex-smoker has a craving it goes away all by itself! We just aren't used to letting cravings go away because they never just went away by themselves when we were actively smoking.

So really when you get the urge you know there are two things you can do to end it. You can smoke, or you can just wait a few minutes until it passes. For 38 days I've chosen the latter.
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sid808
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

15 Sep 2008, 07:52 #50

Hello Joel:
I have been reading on the message board Craves-Thoughts: The Urge Hits and on the relapse board: the Fallacy of a Good Cigarette. I am finding that you can never read to much or be to prepared if you want to keep your quit. I feel very lucky to have found your writtings Joel on why quit .com and Freedom from Tobacco. I plan on reading more to keep my self prepared at all times. I will be turning Green tomarrow and never want to lose my quit or my life to nicotine. As the days and hours have gone by on this quit, I find that my mind is clearer and I am better able to understand the concepts presented here. I never want to smoke again and Never Take Another Puff is becoming a part of who I am . It's like it is replacing some of the messages and thoughts to smoke in my head. Thank you Joel and everyone at Freedom.

Sid

I have been quit for 4W 1D 18h 18m (29 days). I have saved $238.10 by not smoking 1,190 cigarettes. I have saved 4D 3h 10m of my life. My Quit Date: 8/15/2008 10:30 PM
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