The Terrible 3's

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

31 Aug 2002, 22:33 #31

Thank you, Joel, for helping me out. I couldn't remember where the seasonal material was altho' I have read the terrrible threes several times and loved it.. I was going to link that one instead of the one I did. I just linked the other one to make sure I was in fact linking successfully. I am probably ,as usual ,using the wrong term.. Anyway, thanks again. Lilac
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

01 Sep 2002, 09:56 #32

This one's for Naymor. You mentioned something in another thread about the new season coming up and the triggers that come along with it.
YQS,
MareBear
Not a puff for: 3 Months 3 Days 13 Minutes 17 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 1900, saving me $294.53.
Last edited by MareBear GOLD on 06 Mar 2009, 23:10, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 Sep 2002, 22:49 #33

No seasond on the tropics, but life changes periodically and moves differently. Going on my third month soon I dont know how to identify my seasonal triggers. Who cares. I will keep a watch on my craves.

Juan
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

29 Oct 2002, 01:49 #34

I also don't necesssarily put alot of stock in the concept of terrible threes, but I will say that interestingly I'm at 3 months, 3 weeks, and 3 days and the last week and a half or so have been very strangely and unexpectantly difficult.

I plod along nonetheless.

, Sarah
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

17 Jan 2003, 23:55 #35

Awwww .....thanks Richard. Looking forward to turning silver right after your gold. -YQS, Lotus
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

11 Mar 2003, 04:30 #36

For all of my fellow FREEDOMITES looking forward to Spring...
we're almost there!
YQS-
Lotus
2 weeks from 6 months!
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Mar 2003, 23:58 #37

I saw spring time started to being talked about today and here in the Midwest part of the United States, springlike conditions are starting to become obvious. With seasonal changes will come seasonal triggers. The way to get through seasonal triggers is the same way you got through any other earlier trigger--, continuing on with your life while keeping yourself reminded of the reasons you first quit and keeping your ammunition reinforced of why you are still committed to never take another puff!
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

16 Mar 2003, 14:04 #38

this does ring a bit of a bell with me. twice i have stopped for 3 months and wham, i was back at it. i can't even tell you why. i do suppose it is different for everyone and i don't want to jinx myself so....
i think i'll take the easy way out and acknowledge that i did not smoke Today. just today. yesterday was a bear, today was bearable, and who knows about tomarrow much less 3 months from now.
would it be funny if i said i had an itchy "trigger" finger?
nadette
1w,5d,19hrs
512cns, $76.80 jingling
Reply
Like

g
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:46

16 Mar 2003, 15:15 #39

This makes so much sense in a rediculous way. I can remember last Spring, thinking about quitting smoking, but then talking myself out of it because "what would I do while I was camping in the summer if I wasn't smoking?" Smoking was an important part of camping for me. Not anymore though, because I refuse to take another puff.
I am so glad that I do not smoke.
Smoke free for Five days, 10 hours, 7 minutes and 38 seconds. 97 cigarettes not smoked, saving $22.69. Life saved: 8 hours, 5 minutes.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:46

16 Mar 2003, 22:27 #40

It's sort of a jolt to read about all the activities that you'll participate in after quitting and realize how long it's been since you've done them without smoking. How about realizing that you've never done virtually anything in your adult life without being a smoker? I'm sure many of us are in that same situation; having smoked since childhood (in my case: 12 years old) and not having quit until much, much later (but never too late!) in life (again, in my case: 52 years old).

It's an odd feeling doing so many things without cigarettes; but very enjoyable and very... FREE. And every day that goes by just makes it that much better.

73 days, 19 hours of freedom; 2435 cigs not smoked; $1035 CDN saved; 8 days, 11 hours of my new life saved; the feeling: priceless
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Apr 2003, 07:56 #41

For Cookie:

Being that you just turned 6 months there may very likely be some of the same seasonal change issues that this string addresses.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

16 Apr 2003, 03:09 #42

It was very warm in MN yesterday so I wanted to find this. I also wanted to happily announce that this spring is my last "3" to adjust to since quitting last summer: YIPPPEEE!

, Sarah ( 9 Months 1 Week 4 Days 4 Hours 25 Minutes 1 Second. Cigarettes not smoked: 5703. Money saved: $1,214.88.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Dec 2003, 09:51 #43

I see a few of our people approaching the three month mark and thinking about smoking a little more than usual. This post is a good one explaining the issues with three months as well as the seasonal and holiday issues associated with this particular time of year.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:37

21 Mar 2004, 05:51 #44

Thank you Thank you Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have been really struggling lately with extra thoughts of smoking and didn't understand why. This was so helpful.

Erin - Free and Healing for Three Months, Five Days, 17 Hours and 30 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 6 Days and 17 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1935 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $323.39.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Sep 2004, 19:47 #45

I bring up this post most of the time now to discuss seasonal triggers. The original intent of the string though was broader than this. It was designed to dispel the myth that all ex-smokers are destined to have problems at predetermined time frames. Today there was a member who wrote about having a problem into his second month and a few other members joined in saying how hard the second month was for them. For our thousands of long-term members these posts are of no concern. Those who had a tough time at two months would simply agree and those who didn't would simply recognize that the issue didn't apply to them. Either way though both groups were beyond the time frame.

The problem is people who are just off for one month, or a week, or a few days, or people who are here reading just considering quitting will see posts like this and begin to dread the "inevitable" two month mark where they have now been led to believe that they were going to begin to experience a tough and miserable time.

The truth is that there is nothing inherently threatening about the two month mark. Some people may experience some tough times, others will not. This is no different than the three month mark issue discussed above or any time frame.

Everyone reading here needs to know though that as long as they keep reminding themselves of the reasons that they first quit and keep reinforcing their reasons for wanting to stay off that even at these arbitrary moments of smoking thoughts that their quits will stay intact as long as they stick to thecommitment that they made to themselves to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:46

14 Dec 2004, 03:02 #46

Joel,
This post IS important to me, for some reasons other than you mentioned. I'll try to explain. I have had problems with patience, expecting my "quit" to have progressed faster than it has. But knowing that SOME people do have trouble in their second month, or third or whatever is some what comforting to me. Not that I want others to have any trouble at all, but rather that this happens sometimes, so deal with it.

I appreciate how you bring up threads. It is very helpful. At one point for me it was critical. Simply I thought I was loosing my mind. Your "Emotions" thread helped understand what was going on. This thread does the same thing, and helps me to try to be more patient. So for me it is not the "predetermined time frames" but rather the the work needs to continue for, perhaps, a longer time than one might have thought. And that is OK and not unusual.

Hans
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Dec 2004, 02:35 #47

Yesterday was the first day of winter, marking one of the seasonal changes that this post refers to.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Mar 2005, 20:19 #48

I forgot to bring this one up yesterday. It is cold in Chicago and doesn't feel much like spring yet. But spring is here and I suspect in some parts of the northern hemisphere it may very well be feeling quite spring like. That feeling may very well induce some triggers but no one should be overly concerned about experiencing triggers. A trigger circumstance cannot undercut your quit as long as you have your resolve reinforced and stay focused on why you first quit and why you still want to be free from nicotine. To overcome all trigger events and break the conditioned response of wanting a cigarette in the future when facing the same trigger again is as simple as continuing to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff! Joel
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Jul 2005, 04:12 #49

From: Joel Sent: 3/18/2005 6:44 AM
I bring up this post most of the time now to discuss seasonal triggers. The original intent of the string though was broader than this. It was designed to dispel the myth that all ex-smokers are destined to have problems at predetermined time frames. Today there was a member who wrote about having a problem into his second month and a few other members joined in saying how hard the second month was for them. For our thousands of long-term members these posts are of no concern. Those who had a tough time at two months would simply agree and those who didn't would simply recognize that the issue didn't apply to them. Either way though both groups were beyond the time frame. The problem is people who are just off for one month, or a week, or a few days, or people who are here reading just considering quitting will see posts like this and begin to dread the "inevitable" two month mark where they have now been led to believe that they were going to begin to experience a tough and miserable time.

The truth is that there is nothing inherently threatening about the two month mark. Some people may experience some tough times, others will not. This is no different than the three month mark issue discussed above or any time frame.

Everyone reading here needs to know though that as long as they keep reminding themselves of the reasons that they first quit and keep reinforcing their reasons for wanting to stay off that even at these arbitrary moments of smoking thoughts that their quits will stay intact as long as they stick to the commitment that they made to themselves to never take another puff!

Joel
The very same principle applies to people who have been off for 10 days, or 20 days, or any other denomination of days. No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff.

Joel
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Aug 2005, 21:53 #50

For anyone who thinks there is a phenomena of terrible sixes. The same concepts apply.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Sep 2005, 05:50 #51

This post applies not only to the issue of "threes," but also to seasonal triggers. Being that we are entering the holiday weekend which for many seems like the end of the summer season and the beginning of the autumn season, I thought it seemed appropriate to bring this one up.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Jan 2006, 19:28 #52

Read 'somewhere' about experiencing 3 day cycles in a quit. Of course my mother, (an old wife at the time I guess) used to always talk about everything happening in groups of Threes - like famous people dying at the same time period etc. Ridiculous superstition in reality, but another false association that is an undercurrent in modern society. - JoeJ Free

From Joel's commentary above:
You overcome these triggers the same way you overcome the original triggers-just don't give into them. The first time it will be a stronger thought, but after successfully overcoming the specific event, it will become easier and easier each successive time. Eventually, not smoking will become the habit for the specific event.

You need to be prepared for these periodic fluctuations in number of smoking thoughts. Not because of the terrible threes, just because you need to be prepared everyday that there might be moments where there is a desire for a cigarette. It is a matter of always keeping your guard up, and remembering that not smoking is important everyday. Still comes down to the premise of waking up everyday and saying to yourself, "I will not smoke today," and going to bed each night proud of the accomplishment. Do this and you will make it through all the "terrible threes" (and they might now be in anyway terrible) having been able to successfully Never Take Another Puff!

Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Apr 2006, 23:34 #53

Just thought I'd bring this one to the top since many of us are hovering around one of the "3's". Spring is here and last night was one of the first really warm breezy nights here. I walked out onto my deck, which was always my place for relaxation in the late evening with that "aahhhh" cig. It hit me in the face like a brick. I hightailed it back in here to the computer to find this post instead of sitting outside . Tonight, I think I'll sit outside and see what it really smells like out there .
Kat
Free for 2 Months, 4 Weeks, 2 Days, 4 hours and 3 minutes (89 days). $414.62 saved, 2,675 cigarettes not smoked. I have not stood freezing or frying in the elements for 1 Week, 2 Days, 6 hours and 55 minutes of my life. Quit date: 1/3/2006 7:30 AM
Last edited by KatieDidIt1999 on 06 Mar 2009, 23:15, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

18 Jun 2006, 20:27 #54

From above:

You need to be prepared for these periodic fluctuations in number of smoking thoughts. Not because of the terrible threes, just because you need to be prepared everyday that there might be moments where there is a desire for a cigarette. It is a matter of always keeping your guard up, and remembering that not smoking is important everyday.

Still comes down to the premise of waking up everyday and saying to yourself, "I will not smoke today," and going to bed each night proud of the accomplishment. Do this and you will make it through all the "terrible threes" (and they might not be in anyway terrible) having been able to successfully Never Take Another Puff!

Joel
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Jun 2006, 20:28 #55

From above:

I bring up this post most of the time now to discuss seasonal triggers. The original intent of the string though was broader than this. It was designed to dispel the myth that all ex-smokers are destined to have problems at predetermined time frames. Today there was a member who wrote about having a problem into his second month and a few other members joined in saying how hard the second month was for them. For our thousands of long-term members these posts are of no concern. Those who had a tough time at two months would simply agree and those who didn't would simply recognize that the issue didn't apply to them. Either way though both groups were beyond the time frame.

The problem is people who are just off for one month, or a week, or a few days, or people who are here reading just considering quitting will see posts like this and begin to dread the "inevitable" two month mark where they have now been led to believe that they were going to begin to experience a tough and miserable time.

The truth is that there is nothing inherently threatening about the two month mark. Some people may experience some tough times, others will not. This is no different than the three month mark issue discussed above or any time frame.

Everyone reading here needs to know though that as long as they keep reminding themselves of the reasons that they first quit and keep reinforcing their reasons for wanting to stay off that even at these arbitrary moments of smoking thoughts that their quits will stay intact as long as they stick to the commitment that they made to themselves to never take another puff!

Joel

The very same principle applies to people who have been off for 10 days, or 20 days, or any other denomination of days. No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff.

Joel
Reply
Like