The Palmolive Bottle Demonstration

The Palmolive Bottle Demonstration

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Oct 2001, 18:19 #1

Ex-smokers are often tempted when watching others smoke. Spending time with a specific friend and watching them smoke may be a trigger especially if it was the most time you had spend with the friend since you quit smoking. The first time you have any new experiences, even if smoking is not part of the ritual, the thought for a cigarette will seem like a natural part of the ritual.

Another factor is when watching a person smoke, the natural tendency is for the ex-smoker to start to fantasize about how good a cigarette will be at that given moment. A more productive way to handle the situation though is to really watch the person smoke one, and then wait a few minutes as they light another and then another. Soon you will see that they are smoking in a way that you don't want to and probably in a way that they don't want to either. But they have no choice. You do. Also, I am attaching a letter here that addresses this issue. It is a little harder to describe because it is based on a demonstration I do at live seminars that you have never seen.

One demonstration I do at all my live seminars is a little smoking contraption made out of a plastic Palmolive bottle with a mouth piece inserted to hold a cigarette. The simulation shows how much smoke comes in when a person inhales, and how much comes out when they exhale. Smokers often feel they take in smoke and then blow most of it out, when in actuality, a very small percent actually comes out (about 10%.) I always use cigarettes given to me by people in the audience, if I used one I brought people would think I was using a loaded cigarette. Anyway, below is a letter I wrote for clinic graduates who have seen this demonstration. The concepts here though apply to those who haven't also. Take my word for it, or better yet, Joanne, Linda or Joyce could explain their memories of the demonstration. Viewing smoking as it really looks will minimize the temptation even of a puff.

Anyway, here is the letter.



Whenever you watch a person smoking, think of the Palmolive bottle demonstration you saw the first day of the Stop Smoking Clinic. Visualize all of the smoke that goes into the bottle that doesn't come out. Also, remember that the smoker is not only going to smoke that one cigarette. He will probably smoke another within a half-hour. Then another after that. In fact, he will probably smoke 20, 40, 60 or even more cigarettes by the end of the day. And tomorrow will be the same. After looking at cigarettes like this, you don't want to smoke a cigarette, do you?

I always suggest that clinic participants follow this simple visualization exercise to help them overcome the urge for a cigarette. When I suggested it to one participant who was off for three days she replied, "I see, you want me to brainwash myself so that I don't want a cigarette."

Somehow I don't consider this technique of visualizing smoking brainwashing. It is not like the ex-smoker is being asked to view smoking in an artificially horrible, nightmarish manner. To the contrary, I am only asking the ex-smoker to view cigarette smoking in its true light.

The Palmolive bottle demonstration accurately portrays the actual amount of smoke that goes in as compared to the small amount that you see the smoker blow out. Most smokers believe they exhale the majority of smoke they inhale into their lungs. But, as you saw by the demonstrations, most of the smoke remains in the lungs. When you visualize all the smoke that remains, it does not paint a pretty picture of what is happening in the smoker. Maybe not a pretty picture, but an accurate one.

When an ex-smoker watches a person smoke a cigarette, he often fantasizes about how much the smoker is enjoying it--how good it must taste and make him feel. It is true he may be enjoying that particular cigarette, but the odds are he is not.

Most smokers enjoy a very small percentage of the cigarettes they smoke. In fact, they are really unaware of most of the cigarettes they smoke. Some are smoked out of simple habit, but most are smoked in order to alleviate withdrawal symptoms experienced by all smokers whose nicotine levels have fallen below minimal requirements. The cigarette may taste horrible, but the smoker has to smoke it. And because the majority of smokers are such addicts, they must smoke many such cigarettes every single day in order to maintain a constant blood nicotine level.

Don't fantasize about cigarettes. Always keep a clear, objective perspective of what it would once again be like to be an addicted smoker. There is no doubt at all that if you relapse to smoking you will be under the control of a very powerful addiction. You will be spending hundreds of dollars a year for thousands of cigarettes. You will smell like cigarettes and be viewed as socially unacceptable in many circles. You will be inhaling thousands of poisons with every puff. These poisons will rob you of your endurance and your health. One day they may eventually rob you of your life.

Consider all these consequences of smoking. Then, when you watch a smoker you will feel pity for them, not envy. Consider the life he or she is living compared to the simpler, happier, and healthier life you have had since you broke free from your addiction. Consider all this and you will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
The Palmolive Bottle smoking demonstration.

Again you can see how the smoke had darkened the bottle after about a few hundred cigarettes. You can start to see how the smoker's lungs below became so discolored. Smokers don't just put a total of a few hundred cigarettes in their system; they literally deliver hundreds of thousands of cigarettes over their shortened lifetime. This discoloration effect is more than just aesthetically unpleasant--it is in fact deadly.

This picture looks like it was an exhalation after about 10 previous exhalations, not that much is seen in this particular photo. I normally get a tremendous amount of smoke out of the bottle with every drag, normally we can smoke up a room with one cigarette. If you look at the mouthpiece of the bottle, it is almost solid brown with tar. It used to be clear. I have used this bottle with somewhere between 300 and 400 cigarettes. While that may sound like a lot, most people smokemore than that in any given month. Even the bottle is pretty yellow and I blow out almost all of the smoke used when it inhales. The bottle is dry allowing me to do this, your lungs are moist trapping most of the tars when inhaled. Literally over 90% of the tar that is inhaled stays in the lung, when you see a person exhale they are literally blowing out about 10% of the smoke.

When viewed this way, even one puff seems disgusting to most people. While the bottle may appear brown from just a few hundred cigarettes, lungs get browner and the discoloration poses much more than just a risk of looking bad. The 4,000 chemicals that turn the lungs brown are downright deadly, as can be seen in the photos below.


Non smokers lung with carbon deposits from pollution
Smokers lung with cancer. White area on top is the cancer,
this is what killed the person. The blackened area is just the
deposit of tars that all smokers paint into their lungs
with every puff they take.
To add a little more perspective to the demonstration, here is another way to see how much tar actually gets into the lungs from smoking. Below is the picture of a smoking machine.
This machine smokes 2,000 cigarettes a day, mimicking smokers puffing patterns to capture equivalent amounts of tar as would a smoker. In one day the machine captures the amount of smoke in the picture below.
This is the same amount a pack a day smoker will paint in his or her lungs in a little over three months. You can see why the lungs are so discolored. But again, the discoloration is a minor issue. It is not that the lungs look altered, it is the fact that there are thousands of chemical being deposited with over 40 that are cancer causing chemicals. Again, keep seeing cigarettes for as they are and your logical choice will be to always never take another puff!
As long as I am bringing this one up again, figured I would add another dimension to the story. The bottle above with the tar collected from 2,000 cigarettes. If a dilute form (dilute, not concentrated is as often done in animal experimentation to demostrate that chemicals are carcinogens) of this tar is painted on the skin of mice, 60% of the animals developed cancer of the skin within a year.
Many chemicals currently banned for human consumption were removed from usage if they even caused 5% or less cases of cancer in similar experiments. Cigarette tars contain some of the most carcinogenic chemicals known. Consider this when watching people smoking and exhaling only 10% of the tars they actually take in. Watch them smoke and it will strengthen your resolve to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Nov 2001, 19:31 #2

Links to YouTube videos covering lung damages caused by smoking and other concepts covered in this string:

Lung Cancer

The Palmolive bottle demonstration

See how smoking destroys the lungs

Premature deaths caused by smoking

Watching others smoke
Last edited by Joel on 13 Oct 2011, 18:25, edited 4 times in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

20 Nov 2001, 03:27 #3

Hi Joel,

I just wanted to take a second out of my lunch break to let you know how much I appreciate this article. This article was one of the ones that influenced me most. It is very hard to understand what changes your body goes through without seeing
any pictorial evidence. This articles and the other ones you have out there are what really inspired me to quit once I found Freedom. Thanks for sharing all the great articles and giving us the strength and knowledge to quit smoking.

Kind Regards,
Ryan

I have not smoked for Six months, four days, 14 hours, 25 minutes and 38 seconds. 3772 cigarettes not smoked, saving $660.25. Life saved: 1 week, 6 days, 2 hours, 20 minutes.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Feb 2002, 21:16 #4

For PCCAMPBELL:

Here is my most recent picture of the Palmolive Bottle, just shot this weekend for another Freedom post.
Just for the record, if you look at the mouthpiece it is almost totally coated with tar. I have used this exact bottle top and mouth piece for almost 30 years, it has probably smoked about 900 cigarettes to collect up this much tar. This bottle top has probably smoked under 5 cartons of cigarettes and is pretty much totally coated. The bottle itself has smoked probably 400-500 cigarettes, I had to replace it a little over 20 years ago. So the mouth piece has an accumulation of 900 cigarettes, the same amount a pack a day smoker puts in his or her lungs in about a month and a half. It becomes quite obvious why such dramatic lung discoloration occurs when a person smokes for years and decades. To stop the madness of applying thousands of chemicals, hundreds which are poisons, some that are invisible but still lethal, others that are clearly seen and cause such horrible discoloration, 43 which are carcinogenic, some that make you smell offensive and caustic to others around you, and one that is invisible, odorless, and yet causes probably more deaths than most of the other chemicals combined and, on top of it has totally controlled you for years and decades--nicotine--to end the cycle of being an active addict always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 21:02

07 Feb 2002, 23:05 #5

I'm relatively new here.....i quit one week and 4 days ago now.....and i was really affected by this posting. are there any accurate studies on how much ex-smokers can clear out the gross build-up in their lungs? will it ever be like we didn't smoke, or can we, at best, look for some improvement?

i never want to put another puff of that stuff in my lungs.

sue
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Feb 2002, 23:47 #6

Hello Sue:



There is some cleansing that will go on over time but much of the discoloration goes will not go away. But the chemicals do lose their potency over time as the longer a person is off smoking, the lower the risk of a new cancer forming over time. Eventually the risks do get much lower, much closer to that of a person who never smoked.

But the underlying lung tissue, which is destroyed by smoking, stays destroyed. That is why once a person is diagnosed with emphysema, they will have the disease the rest of his or her life, even if he or she quits smoking. They will stop the greatly accelerated destruction of more tissue, minimizing the future loss to that of aging, which is slow and usually not greatly significant. If they were to continue to smoke though they would be destroying new tissue with every drag they took.

In the future, a pathologist will be able to tell if the person were a smoker of they examine the underlying lung tissue. But the tissue that lines the lining of the bronchus does in fact return to normal. A pathologist examining microscopic slides of future scrapings of this area would actually not be able to tell that the person was a smoker. This is not insignificant either because over 80% of cancers that occur in the lung are from this very area, the lining of the bronchus. The Cilia string elaborates on this process in a little more detail.

Even though emphysema patients won't grow new lung tissue, their breathing often improves when they quit, for with the cilia working again, they help clear out the smaller airways and makes it easier for the still existing lung tissue to work more efficiently. Plus, with the elimination of carbon monoxide that happens when a person quits smoking, literally coming down to a never smoker's level in about a week from their last cigarette, the whole oxygen transport system of your body is more efficient, thus reducing the workload on the heart and lungs.

You have done yourself a great benefit by quitting-and will sustain these benefits forever as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

15 Feb 2002, 11:51 #7

for nightsnacker
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Mar 2002, 22:27 #8

I thought for people who may still be encountering some smokers at holiday gatherings would benefit from this one. There was a really neat picture in this string that I lifted from Ingrid that seems to be missing. Does anyone (especially Ingrid) know where it might be?
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2002, 09:42 #9

Since my background came up today I thought this post would add a little historical perspective. In post 6 of this string here I put in a picture of what the bottle looked like in February of this year (2002.) Here is a picture with what I am pretty sure is the same bottle from back in July of 1975. I was on a stage of the Civic Center in downtown Chicago demonstrating the bottle to the crowds at lunch time. It was an organized smoking prevention rally, work I was doing with the American Cancer Society at the time--I just didn't do this as one of many Chicago street performers of the day. I don't know if you can tell from the photograph but the bottle was a lot cleaner back then.
Since this picture was taken I changed my tactics.
I wouldn't wear a shirt today that says "Please don't smoke."
(Read the link as to why)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Apr 2002, 10:28 #10

I accidentally deleted a lot of pics when I was trying to transfer them to the online album Joel. I think this is the missing one.
Ingrid
Last edited by murphying (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 18:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2002, 10:33 #11

From: Joel. Sent: 3/2/2002 6:13 AM
I borrowed the picture and punch line below from Ingrid. Just being in an environment like this will not threaten your quit as in directly causing a relapse because of nicotine absorption--but it can threaten your health. Very few never-smokers or ex-smokers would leave this environment feeling good--most in fact would feel varying degrees of discomfort.

I got to say, it hurts me to just look at this picture for knowing the way I would feel in a matter of minutes--and I have no relapse fear involved here. With that being said, I still know I would feel adverse effects of a burning throat, eyes and probably be coughing from the assault on my lungs. The odds are pretty good that most of you would feel adverse effects from such exposure too. For a person with any pre-existing condition short term exposure of this magnitude could be down right dangerous and in some extreme circumstances--life threatening. Life time exposure could put the non-smoker at risk of developing potentially deadly smoking related illnesses.

To minimize your exposure to to the risks of inhaling thousands of irritants, poisons and carcinogens in tobacco smoke avoid such exposures whenever possible and most important, to avoid taking in 10 times the amount of the chemicals that the man in this picture is blowing out with the exhalation below* with every drag always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Tempting isn't it......the mask I mean lol!
yqs Ingrid
*90% of the chemicals that are inhaled into the lung stays in the lung--you are seeing approximately 1/10th of the chemicals being blown out in the photo below.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2002, 10:35 #12

Thanks Ingrid--I missed that picture. I reassembled the piece here an deleted the earlier version.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2002, 11:00 #13

I just can't get over that picture of you and all the ole foggies in the background! You have always been a firecracker Joel! Is it ok if we use that gas mask image on WhyQuit's Second Hand Smoke page or does it belong to another site Ingrid : )))) LOL
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Apr 2002, 13:22 #14

I enjoyed that picture of Joel too - it sort of personifies his fight against smoking - there's a lot to be said for him that he seems to be just as enthusiastic now as he looks to have been way back then!

As far as that gasmask pic goes John - as far as I'm concerned you can do what you want with it ..... but I can't remember where I got it from - have a feeling it was on some site I came across when I was doing a bit of my own research into the sidestream smoke issue.

Ingrid
Free and loving it!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Apr 2002, 05:27 #15

The second hand smoke issue was just raised again. This string has a few photos that add a little perspective on the issue. The pictures of the lungs in the original post are a good case in point. While I can't say with a 100% certainty that the non-smoker's lung in the picture was ever exposed to second hand smoke--I feel quite confident in saying that there was a really good chance that it was. I have had those pictures for over 30 years which means that photo was shot at a time when over half of the men in this country smoked. Non-smoking sections didn't exist in almost any places at that time. The non-smoker probably had a greater exposure to second hand smoke back then than is normally experienced anywhere in America today.

The picture of the younger me with the palmolive bottle shows pretty clearly what a single drag actually looks like in the lung. Keep in mind, that is a clear bottle that is being made totally opaque from the smoke from a single drag.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Apr 2002, 11:28 #16

For Jadel as he watches people smoke around him.
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01 May 2002, 20:56 #17

I was just talking to a friend about this string.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 May 2002, 02:38 #18

For Jenny
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20 May 2002, 21:53 #19

For those still enjoying the smell of smoke. It is normally a minority of ex-smokers who continue to like the smell of smoke. The fact is these people can be around smokers and their quit can and will stay secure as long as they don't puff on a cigarette themselves. But as far as asking people to blow smoke your way, there is a philosophical question they should be asking yourself.

Do you want to give smokers the idea that you somehow miss smoking or that the smoker has something going really good for themselves? Keep in mind, these smokers can be looking at you as a person who used to be just like them--an out of control addicted smoker who has now quit and appreciates being smoke free. But by asking them to blow smoke your way, you are giving them the perception that you have sacrificed something great in your life and may be giving them the message that you somehow regret your quit. You may in fact be discouraging them from quitting.

So my advice to you, if these people are your family members or friends, or any people you actually care about, such requests while seeming harmless to you may in fact be hurting their chances of quitting. Do you really want to encourage these people to smoke? If they are people you don't care about this is probably no big deal--although do you even want strangers to be putting their life at risk in order to feed an addiction.

Your quit is for you though. This is a straight judgment call on your part. As I said before, you can be around such exposure without relapsing--but think very carefully of what kind of message you are sending others and also what you are thinking about smoking for yourself. If you still see cigarette smoke as a good thing, you could probably stand to read through this one again as well as the Smoking's Impact on the Lungs article.

One more thing--while I say that second hand smoke exposure will not cause a relapse--there can still be adverse health effects from such exposure. Don't think because you like the smell that this means the smoke is not hurting you. Hydrogen cyanide smells sweet--almost like almonds yet it is highly toxic and potentially lethal. Smells can be deceiving. See cigarettes for what they are and they will automatically stink to you--not only for how they smell but for what they do. Cigarette smoke kills people, lots of people and if given the opportunity will kill you. To avoid stinking up your life and messing up your health always remember why you committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jun 2002, 09:31 #20

I know I just brought up another string covering this issue, but this one had some great graphics on the second hand smoke exposure.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Jun 2002, 02:05 #21

More on the second hand smoke exposure.
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09 Jun 2002, 05:00 #22

For William
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31 Jul 2002, 05:56 #23

I just resurrected this letter from a comment made by a member about our brainwashing techniques. Thought it probably belonged attached to this post also.

Joel

Whenever you watch a person smoking, think of the Palmolive bottle demonstration you saw the first day of the Stop Smoking Clinic. Visualize all of the smoke that goes into the bottle that doesn't come out. Also, remember that the smoker is not only going to smoke that one cigarette. He will probably smoke another within a half hour. Then another after that. In fact, he will probably smoke 20, 40, 60 or even more cigarettes by the end of the day. And tomorrow will be the same. After looking at cigarettes like this, you don't want to smoke a cigarette, do you

I always suggest that clinic participants follow this simple visualization exercise to help them overcome the urge for a cigarette. When I suggested it to one participant who was off for three days she replied, "I see, you want me to brainwash myself so that I don't want a cigarette

Somehow I don't consider this technique of visualizing smoking brainwashing. It is not like the ex-smoker is being asked to view smoking in an artificially horrible, nightmarish manner. To the contrary, I am only asking the ex-smoker to view cigarette smoking in its true light

The Palmolive bottle demonstration accurately portrays the actual amount of smoke that goes in as compared to the small amount that you see the smoker blow out. Most smokers believe they exhale the majority of smoke they inhale into their lungs. But, as you saw by the demonstrations, most of the smoke remains in the lungs. When you visualize all the smoke that remains, it does not paint a pretty picture of what is happening in the smoker. Maybe not a pretty picture, but an accurate one

When an ex-smoker watches a person smoke a cigarette, he often fantasizes about how much the smoker is enjoying it--how good it must taste and make him feel. It is true he may be enjoying that particular cigarette, but the odds are he is not

Most smokers enjoy a very small percentage of the cigarettes they smoke. In fact, they are really unaware of most of the cigarettes they smoke. Some are smoked out of simple habit, but most are smoked in order to alleviate withdrawal symptoms experienced by all smokers whose nicotine levels have fallen below minimal requirements. The cigarette may taste horrible, but the smoker has to smoke it. And because the majority of smokers are such addicts, they must smoke many such cigarettes every single day in order to maintain a constant blood nicotine level

Don't fantasize about cigarettes. Always keep a clear, objective perspective of what it would once again be like to be an addicted smoker. There is no doubt at all that if you relapse to smoking you will be under the control of a very powerful addiction. You will be spending hundreds of dollars a year for thousands of cigarettes. You will smell like cigarettes and be viewed as socially unacceptable in many circles. You will be inhaling thousands of poisons with every puff. These poisons will rob you of your endurance and your health. One day they may eventually rob you of your life

Consider all these consequences of smoking. Then, when you watch a smoker you will feel pity for them, not envy. Consider the life he or she is living compared to the simpler, happier, and healthier life you have had since you broke free from your addiction. Consider all this and you will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

15 Aug 2002, 09:13 #24

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Sep 2002, 00:14 #25

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