John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 4th, 2004, 3:31 am #61



The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 3:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 2nd, 2005, 4:21 am #62

From: OBob-Gold Sent: 12/31/2004 3:51 PM
Just keeping all the installments on the front page...

INSTALLMENT 2....

(Joel's reply)
Contrary to the opinion above, you cannot light a cigarette for another person unless you are fully prepared to going back to smoking yourself. You are a drug addict and you can easily absorb enough nicotine through your oral mucosa to cause a relapse. The same phenomena is seen in people who puff on a cigar after quitting smoking cigarettes. Even after years or decades of total abstinence, that seemingly innocent action has caused many to relapse to full-fleged smoking again.

(My note) This was the person's final post at Freedom, (almost a year ago), after being a fairly regular poster. Draw your own conclusions as to why.



More from the vaults...


The ironic thing is, that I gave up for 7 years and then started again ... with just that one puff. Now, four years on from that first puff, I am trying all over again. For some reason - this second time around is so much harder. Honestly - the first time for me was pretty much a walk in the park (I was smoking 30 a day for 8 years), and went cold turkey without a problem - I was SO determined. I guess I was lucky ..... I wish that I had not risked that good luck by taking that first puff again four years ago. All fine in hindsight huh ......



My most successful prior quit was many years ago, CT (no OTC NRT at the time), and lasted nearly three weeks, until I thought that just one puff would see me through and help me continue my quit! Ugh! I wish I had read this information back then.

I won't go there because been there, done that. (I wasn't a member of Freedom at the time - but almost the exact same thing happened to me. You however, are much, much, stronger than I was. It took me 8 years after a successful year of not smoking, then relapse, to finally find Freedom.)


So last month I tried to quit cold turkey and made it 7 days. The cravings were driving me nuts and I just couldn't take it. I had one puff..... then one cigarette.... then in a day I was back up to my normal pack a day. .


His first quit with me lasted well over a year. He took a cigarette one day and didn't get hooked--actually puffed away ever now and then for a few weeks before losing it. He basically inspired my letter the lucky ones get hooked. I lost contact with him a few years back--at that time he was still chain smoking. He had at that point smoked on and off again close to 20 years after that first relapse after having once been off for a year.



I quit once 5 years ago (for 14 months) when I was pregnant with my 2nd child (I smoked during my 1st pregnancy 5-10 cigs a day). I was sure I had beat my addiction so I would have 1 cig. occationally. It took about 3 weeks to return to my previous level, and several more quit attempts to reach this point.


Oh, and in case you were wondering, everyone here is right when they say, over and over again, that there is no such thing as "one cigarette" for an addict. It is interesting to note, that as I lit that first cigarette, I was surprised at the taste. It tasted just like the first cigarette I EVER had…do any of you remember that? NOT a pleasant taste. Plus, I began coughing almost immediately. Not to mention the TREMENDOUS LOSS OF PRIDE I felt rushing out of me with every puff. With each cough I felt weak, (cough, COUGH)…and worst of all, I felt beaten; BEATEN by a "little piece of paper filled with 4,000 chemicals". For anyone out there romanticizing that "one cigarette" I hope that you can listen to me when I say, that is a horrible, HORRIBLE feeling.

In three short days... I "enjoyed" five packs of cigarettes…just a little MORE than I smoked prior to my quit. For the record, that's one hundred attempts at getting back that "ahhhhh" feeling (and I never DID get to that point), a total of about $25 dollars wasted in one short weekend, and all of my healing DOWN THE TOILET! I was amazed when I woke up on Saturday morning and looked at myself in the mirror. First of all, I was greeted that morning with the FULL EXTENT of my smokers' hacking cough (uuggghh), and as I gazed at myself in the mirror I actually thought, "My god! I look terrible". All of the gray seemed to have rushed back to my complexion. My gums were red and I swear my teeth looked even more yellow than before I quit. I could not even stand the smell of myself. I spent the night before with my family, getting disappointed looks every time I went to light up. My parents and two sisters, who have all successfully quit, were looking at me with THE MOST disheartening looks. I felt like the biggest failure…and to be blatantly honest, I was.



Two years ago I stopped smoking for approximately 5 months. That had nothing to do with Freedom or Whyquit, I didn't even know they existed then. Then I relapsed at a friend's wedding; feeling too sorry for myself as I watched my friends smoke. Of course, this meant that I then had to spend another two years smoking and yet wishing I didn't


I have not smoked I have not smoked since my first post 5/11/01 on mothers day. RECENTLY I lit up a CIG FOR A FRIEND WHO WAS BLEEDING PROFUSELY ,,,THE MEDICS WERE ON THEIR WAY,i SPIT OUT ALL SMOKE PRIOR TO IT'S TASTE AND SMOKE HITTING MY LUNGS,AND GAVE IT TO HIM.....bUT I STILL HATED MYSELF FOR COMING SO CLOSE TO A puff....
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Recommend Message 12 of 58 in Discussion
From: marty (gold) Sent: 10/3/2002 3:00 AM
Just on the subject of that last quote in Bob's post, the woman who lit a cigarette for a friend, I know the person concerned and can positively confirm that she relapsed within a few days of the event.


From: Joel Sent: 5/16/2003 4:13 AM
Just to comment on the example Marty listed above, the person didn't actually relapse within a few days of the event--she relapsed at the moment she stuck a lit cigarette in her mouth. She just didn't realize that she relapsed until a few days of the event.

Smoke does not need to be brought into the lungs to induce a relapse. Nicotine can be absorbed through many routes. Through the skin as is evident by the use of the patch, and by the oral mucosa as evident by the gum. Lighting a cigarette or putting a cigarette in your mouth will cause the absorbtion of nicotine and that absorbtion is administration of nicotine to your body and administration of nicotine is a relapse.

Trying to rationalize it or define it as anything else is going to kill a quit and killing a quit can very likely end up in killing the quitter. The only way to guarantee staying totally smoke free is to know that they only way to avoid relapsing is to never administer nicotine via any NRT route and as far as for burning tobacco the only way to avoid relapsing is to never take another puff!

Joel

INSTALLMENT 3....
My message is---- It is oh so easy to start again, beware!!! I have quit many times, mostly without the help and info that is now available,and usually on a whim, New year was a favourite!!
My best attempt was for a year in '83 with a group working along the lines that Joel teaches. This was good and I felt I had it beaten!! Then one morning at my place of work I "borrowed" a cigarette from a friend. I could have just the one couldn't I? I had it licked, **** I'd been quit for a good year. Of course this quickly became a practice in my morning routine. As time went on my guilt kicked in and I thought I really was being a little cheeky taking one every morning from this friend, I bought him a pack, and upped my quota to two or three a day!! Naturally this led me back into the addiction that I thought I had licked!!
The point being as Joel relentlessly tells us all---- just one puff is all it takes!!!!!
I have steadily been trying to quit, roughly every two years since then.




In fact, I quit smoking just a couple of months ago! I went about 4 days. Then I took a puff. "Just one won't hurt me," I thought, knowing all the while that I CAN'T control how much and how often. I KNEW that one puff would lead to more, but I gave in and bummed one off a friend. ****, I gave up 4 days and had to start at zero again. Might as well buy a pack and control my smoking to only two a day. Yeah, right! Finished the pack within two days and was back to 1.5 packs a day again. Lesson: Joel's TRUTH, "Never Take Another Puff"



as you know I was nicotine free for 16 years and all it took was ONE PUFF......for the addiction to nicotine.......for 3 years!!!!!! I REMEBER THE FREEDOM.....I had those 16 years, the last 3 years have been miserable.....



I don't even remember how I got addicted again! I started at around 19 yrs old and smoked for 10 years, quit for 3 years, then started to just smoke socially on week-ends for a year until it started to sneak into my week. So stopped for 3 months and then...I can't even remember the first puff...it's all a blur!
So the strange boat that I'm in is that my first quit was alot like everyone's here, everyday was a struggle, after chores, after eating ..etc..but I somehow trained my body to only smoke when I'm socializing and especially drinking..it started off with just on Saturday nights, then both week-end nights, then during the day..and then for some reason, during the work week I could "manage" my cravings. Oh yeah, towards the end, I was using the patch during the week. I think I was becoming addicted to the patch too! But recently they have started to get too strong and annoying , plus my week-end smoking wasn't fun anymore b/c it was getting in the way of everything and it was driving me crazy to manage my cravings. Also, the nicotine I was addicted to this time were in these cute little cigerellos, so it didn't seem like real cigarettes.




I had smoked for about 15 years and then quit for 7. Everyone was so proud of me, it felt great. Well, I was stupid and TOOK ANOTHER PUFF five years ago and began my addiction all over again, only this time I had to be in hiding, how could I tell my family and friends that I had started up again?



During my last quit, before freedom, I found myself in the same situation. It was a year later, I was studying for finals, with the same friend. Her smoke curling around my nose. I thought if I smoked one I would go back to smoke free bliss. It didn't work. Before I knew it, I was back to my old level. I knew nothing about the power of addiction.


I visited one of my customers this week and while I was there she asked her son for a cigarette. I said "I didn't know you smoked". She said "well I had quit 20 years ago and this old friend came to visit me and we had some giggles sharing a couple smokes. Ya know, I can't seem to stop buying them now...". That was a 20 YEAR QUIT THAT SHE LOST!!!! It's never, ever, ever, ever, OK to take another puff for us addicts. Did I stress NEVER!!!

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 5th, 2005, 9:08 am #63



The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance, at the old level of use or greater.
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 3rd, 2005, 10:31 pm #64

No nicotine today. Not one puff. No matter what.
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0124tracyquits
0124tracyquits

February 8th, 2006, 4:04 am #65

Wow! I absolutely love this thread. I know soooo many people who have quit and started because they thought they could handle that one puff. One of these people is my hubby who once quit for 3 years and relapsed, then quit for 1 year and relapsed again. He's on his 3rd quit (1 year, 2 months). You'd think he'd get it by now that he needs to NTAP! I'm going to see if I can get him to sit down and read this thread.

I personally will keep this thread handy and refer to it often!

Tracy - Free and Healing for Nine Days, 23 Hours and 4 Minutes. I have extended my life by 16 Hours by avoiding the use of 199 cigarettes that would have cost me $73.34.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 21st, 2006, 7:19 am #66

Joel makes the eye-opening point that the true measure of the power of nicotine addiction isn't how hard it is to quit; but rather, how easy it is to relapse.

Never take another puff!
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

May 14th, 2006, 7:21 am #67

Read a post where someone said they didn't want to lose their quit. I want to assure everyone that it simply is not possible to "lose" your quit. It isn't like a coin that may fall out of a hole in your pocket. You can't accidently set it down on the counter at the store when you reach for your wallet. It won't get lost under the couch cushions like the TV remote.
The other great thing about your quit is that no one else can take it away from you. Nope, it cannot be stolen, lost, shredded, or wadded up and tossed out with the trash.
The only way your quit will cease to exist is if you choose to relapse. You must make an active, conscious choice to reintroduce nicotine into your body. One puff and goodbye quit. One puff and you prove once again that The Law of Addiction does not make exceptions. One puff and you become just like all the people in this thread.
Your quit is yours. Yours to nurture and treasure and celebrate! Is it sometimes hard to stay free? Yes, in the beginning it can be. Is it worth it to keep choosing to remain free? Yes, every single moment.
Comfort will come. I promise.


Parker - 47 months of making the right choice
Last edited by Parker GOLD on March 13th, 2009, 11:18 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Blue1451
Blue1451

May 28th, 2006, 3:20 pm #68

Awesome thread!!!
We are addicts...one puff and we are dragged back into addiction!! NTAP!!! Hang on tight to your quits!!!
Tracy
2 months..2 day's
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quitforgood
quitforgood

June 11th, 2006, 9:30 am #69

Great thread. I lost two three year quits because I thought I was stronger than my addiction. Don't fool yourself you can never take another puff if you want to stay quit. Brenda (quit 5-31-06)
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 17th, 2006, 9:02 am #70


The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance, at the old level of use or greater.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on February 15th, 2009, 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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System Pilot
System Pilot

July 29th, 2006, 2:35 am #71

I had 22 months nicotine free when I had a cigarette. Now here I am 3 1/2 years later... Do not test this because the lucky one's get hooked.

Free and healing for 1 Week, 4 Days, 5 hours and 4 minutes, while extending my life expectancy 23 hours and 20 minutes, by avoiding the use of 280 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $49.04.
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Skylark0
Skylark0

August 16th, 2006, 4:20 am #72

For me, pesonally, what is even more depressing than the fact that I got myself addicted again after 9 years off cigarettes is that it then took me another 12 years until I was able to quit again successfully despite many, many attempts.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 12th, 2006, 6:11 am #73

For Chris.


The good news - We've all been where you are now. We all made it to 'freedom by taking it One day at a time, sometimes even One hour at a time while remaining committed to Never take another puff


JoeJ Free 700 Days
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on March 13th, 2009, 11:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

August 26th, 2007, 6:39 am #74

Education is the key to holding on to your healing.

Take full advantage of the free education available to you at www.whyquit.com and at Freedom. The quality of the rest of your life is worth the time spent.

Never take another puff!
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Suzi
Suzi

September 9th, 2007, 7:51 am #75

AWESOME post!!! I know from my own experience how true this is. Now when I am going to be around someone who smokes, I start repeating my mantra of "there is no such thing as ONE cigarette. ONE = ALL." Suzi
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 17th, 2007, 11:35 am #76

Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 17th, 2007, 11:13 am #77

Cigarette Smoking Saturates Brain
{alpha}4beta2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors
Authors: Arthur L. Brody, MD, et al
Archives of Gen Psychiatry, August 2006; Volume 63, Number 8, Pages 907-914.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 12th, 2008, 11:13 pm #78


Related reading:

The Law of Addiction
The Lucky One's Get Hooked!
Why we must never take another puff
Have you noticed some of these "lost" long-term quits?
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on March 14th, 2009, 12:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 26th, 2008, 7:52 am #79

Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on March 14th, 2009, 12:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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hwc
hwc

March 12th, 2009, 4:03 am #80

I have a little ritual I do every month on the anniversary of my quit. I find The One Puff Files and do a little reading about the horrors of throwing away a long-time quit by taking a puff. It's my own little monthy reaffirmation of never take another puff and a little time I set aside each month to refocus on my quit and make sure I never so something careless or stupid to throw it away.

I find it useful and, on the odd chance that it might help a fellow quitter, I bump this thread to the top. So, on the occasion of my 13th month without nicotine, here's the bump.
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ThePanster
ThePanster

March 13th, 2009, 12:47 am #81

Thanks for bringing this up front, HWC, and Congratulations on your Freedom-a-versary!

I've never read this thread before, and I am SO glad I did. I can relate to the stories here, and have one of my own. In the hope it will help someone--a complacent former smoker or a newbie still learning about the Law of Addiction -- I repost a portion of my journal into this thread: the story of how I threw away a 7 year quit and then smoked again for well over 10 years after.

Know what I learned: You may be special in the eyes of your loved ones, but addiction will treat you the same as anyone else. This really can happen to you if you break the pledge to Never Take Another Puff.


Oringally posted 3/8/09: About 20 years ago, I made it to the top of the longest, hardest mountain I had ever tried to climb. I had quit smoking. I was in my 20s. I had smoked off and on during junior high school (starting at around age 13) and got to be a much more regular smoker by the time high school rolled around. In college, though, I put them away and believed with all my heart that I would never look back.



For nearly seven years, I didn't. It was a tough quit, like they all are. I stopped and started once then stopped again. My whole family smoked then, and dealing with the constant smell of it and the always-available supply of smokes was quite a challenge. I had constant triggers to deal with and remember how relieved I felt when I was able to finally move out on my own and make my own, smoke-free environment. I bought my first car during college and remember feeling how great it was to be in a car that no one would ever smoke in.



I was lucky to find a great job right after college, and I packed up my new car and moved to a new city to start my life on my own. My first apartment was clean and fresh like my car-a non-smoker lived there. Time went by peacefully and I lived my life like people do. I learned all the things you learn when you're out on your own, I made some mistakes, I had some stresses and some really great times and I did it all without nicotine.



I was really comfortable and happy. So much time had gone by since I'd quit smoking and lived with smokers, I never even thought about smoking anymore. There was a guy at work who smoked, and all I ever thought about him was how bad he smelled. Early in my quit, I used to think all the time about how much I loved being a non-smoker. But years later, it just never crossed my mind. It was just that far gone from my thinking.



If you'd have asked me about it then, I'd have told you that I had that nasty little thing beat. It was over, and that's why I never thought about it. Smoking was just a thing of the past, a habit I'd kicked; just like when I stopped biting my fingernails.



If you'd have asked me "Would you start again?" I would have laughed at you and said, "Of course not! No more than I'd start chewing on my fingers again."

"I'm an adult now," I would have said, "and I call the shots in my life. I like long fingernails, so that's what I have. I don't like the way cigarettes smell, so I don't smoke them. Simple!"



Ah, me. What I didn't know then.




Nearly seven years into my totally numb complacency about smoking, I met a new friend. You've probably all met new friends with whom you have an instant bond-people you know you're going to know for the rest of your life. This was one of those people. And she smoked.



I didn't think much about that, frankly. I'd been around smokers before-as I said, my whole family smoked. She lit up one evening when a bunch of us were out having some fun, and I picked one up and lit it, too.



What did it matter? No matter at all. I had quit. I wasn't a smoker. I could have one, no big deal. "It's been nearly seven years," I would have told myself had any alarm bells gone off in my addled brain at that moment. "It's not like I'm starting again. It's just one."



I wish so much I had never done that.

I do not know why I decided to smoke at that moment after seven years of not smoking, but I can tell you what it did to me.



It made me start smoking all over again, and it made a much more regular smoker out of me. Whereas I'd smoked far less frequently in high school, I was a serious smoker after a few weeks of "social smoking." I got back all the things I had been so happy to leave: I smelled horrible; my car and house smelled horrible; my chest hurt (at the age of 27); I wheezed; I was nervous and anxious; I was chained to the pack all the time, unable to spend any comfortable time at all in non-smoking situations. I had to listen to my husband (who had only known me as a non-smoker up to that point) complain about it all the time. You know what it's like.



I had climbed that mountain, reached the summit, breathed the beautiful air up there, lived there for nearly seven years; and then one day, I just flung myself off of it all the way back down to the very bottom of the dark valley below.



In the years that followed, I climbed up the mountain again, but I always took the wrong path. I used NRT so many times I can't remember. I quit for a few weeks several times, I quit for six months, or nine months; once, I even quit again for a whole year. But each time, I jumped back down off that mountain top.



I suppose no one will ever really know why I chose to do that over and over again, but I do know something now that I was not aware of back then. And I believe this thing I know now-this thing I learned at whyquit.com and here at Freedom-is going to make all the difference in my quit this time: I know that I am an addict, and addicts can't "smoke just one" or "slip" or "have a little relapse." Addicts can't become complacent; addicts must remain vigilant.



I believe that if I had known at the age of 27 that I was an addict and known everything that means, I would have known better.



I thank God I know that now, and I pray that quitting at age 46 was not too late for me.

Amanda

I have been free for 1 Month, 2 Weeks, 1 Day, 23 hours and 8 minutes (43 days). I have saved $117.04 by not smoking 659 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days and 49 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 1/27/2009 9:30 PM
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hwc
hwc

March 13th, 2009, 2:46 am #82

That's some story, Amanda. Makes me kind of glad that I never even tried to quit until I finally did quit (except that I feel like a fool, smoking for 38 years, but no point cryin' about it now.)

It just kills me to read about long-term relapses. It is so senseless. So easy to prevent. I mean, not smoking during the actual nicotine withdrawal is one thing. That can literally be a battle. But, six month? A year? It's just not that hard to never take another puff.
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BJC
BJC

March 13th, 2009, 5:26 am #83

To ThePanster: Thankyou, first of all for your brutal honesty. It can't be easy to admit your defeat. In my own quit I WILL keep your words close at heart: "Addicts can't become complacent: addicts must remain vigilant." I believe you will make it this time! The support is certainly there. You pocess the knowledge needed.
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hwc
hwc

August 11th, 2009, 6:33 pm #84

Bumping to the top, in memory of my dad who would have been so happy to celebrate my anniversary today of 18 months since my last puff. I've missed a couple of months bumping the One Puff Files as I've had to work my own private monthly reading and re-commitment in around other events -- I did them, just not on my exact anniversaries. So, I'm back on my usual schedule, reading a few pages of The One Puff Files and committing to another 30 days without nicotine as my way of celebrating each month!

Read some today and use what you can as reaffirmations of your quits. It's my wish that nobody on this site ever fall prey to a relapse. It's so easy to take out that cheap insurance policy every 30 days with a personal commitment to never take another puff. That personal commitment, just 30 days at a time (or 30 minutes if that's where you are in your quit) will get you through all of life's events that might otherwise serve as a perfect excuse.

After smoking for 35+ years, I quit cold turkey One Year, Six Months, 13 Hours and 9 Minutes ago.
By breaking my active nicotine addiction, I've not purchased and smoked 10951 cigarettes that would have cost me $3,360.34.
Last edited by hwc on August 11th, 2009, 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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hwc
hwc

September 11th, 2009, 5:37 am #85

Just cruisin' through on my monthly anniversary, reading some One Puff Files and bumping it to the top. I'm making my personal commitment tonight to never take another puff for another 30 days. Anyone care to join me? Welcome aboard.

Interesting month. Had a meeting with the friendly tax man. On the way to the meeting, the fuel pump in my car croaked, leaving me stranded by the side of the road. A good samaritan picked me up and was headed my way, so he gave me a lift to my meeting. He was chain smoking my old brand. A lot of junkies would see that setup as the perfect storm of excuses. Oh, my... the stress, right?

I had zero desire to smoke. Didn't bother me that he was smoking. Had a little conversation with the guy about quitting. Just my usual, "quitting isn't half as bad as thinking about quitting" that I offer to addicts without beating them over the head. Zero thought of smoking. I don't do that anymore. It's so much less stressful. I still like to renew my monthly insurance policy, though. It's costs to little to guarantee I won't relapse for another month.

Never take another puff. One month at a time.

After smoking for 35+ years, I quit cold turkey One Year, Seven Months and 31 Minutes ago.
By breaking my active nicotine addiction, I've not purchased and smoked 11560 cigarettes that would have cost me $3,551.84.
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