quitforgood
quitforgood

9:30 AM - Jun 11, 2006 #71

Great thread. I lost two three year quits because I thought I was stronger than my addiction. Don't fool yourself you can never take another puff if you want to stay quit. Brenda (quit 5-31-06)
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

9:02 AM - Jun 17, 2006 #72


The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance, at the old level of use or greater.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 3:46 PM - Feb 15, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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System Pilot
System Pilot

2:35 AM - Jul 29, 2006 #73

I had 22 months nicotine free when I had a cigarette. Now here I am 3 1/2 years later... Do not test this because the lucky one's get hooked.

Free and healing for 1 Week, 4 Days, 5 hours and 4 minutes, while extending my life expectancy 23 hours and 20 minutes, by avoiding the use of 280 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $49.04.
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Skylark0
Skylark0

4:20 AM - Aug 16, 2006 #74

For me, pesonally, what is even more depressing than the fact that I got myself addicted again after 9 years off cigarettes is that it then took me another 12 years until I was able to quit again successfully despite many, many attempts.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

6:11 AM - Dec 12, 2006 #75

For Chris.

The good news - We've all been where you are now. We all made it to 'freedom by taking it One day at a time, sometimes even One hour at a time while remaining committed to Never take another puff



JoeJ Free 700 Days
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 10:53 PM - Apr 04, 2010, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

6:39 AM - Aug 26, 2007 #76

Education is the key to holding on to your healing.

Take full advantage of the free education available to you at www.whyquit.com and at Freedom. The quality of the rest of your life is worth the time spent.

Never take another puff!
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Suzi
Suzi

7:51 AM - Sep 09, 2007 #77

AWESOME post!!! I know from my own experience how true this is. Now when I am going to be around someone who smokes, I start repeating my mantra of "there is no such thing as ONE cigarette. ONE = ALL." Suzi
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

11:35 AM - Oct 17, 2007 #78

Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 3:24 PM - Feb 15, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

11:13 AM - Nov 17, 2007 #79

Cigarette Smoking Saturates Brain
{alpha}4beta2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors
Authors: Arthur L. Brody, MD, et al
Archives of Gen Psychiatry, August 2006; Volume 63, Number 8, Pages 907-914.
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

7:52 AM - Apr 26, 2008 #81

Are "aaahh" memories calling your name? :


   Just a quick post to you former nicotine junkies out there who have invested 10 days to two weeks into your healing yet find yourself toying with new excuses to relapse - FORGET IT !

The millions of smoking memories gradually fading away deep into your mind were created by a drug addict while they rode a 20 to 30 minute lifetime cycle of nicotine-dopamine highs and lows. There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean and your body chemically adjusted to physically functioing without the drug nicotine. Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you! Your cycle of chemical dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 11:03 PM - Apr 04, 2010, edited 1 time in total.
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

12:08 PM - Jun 12, 2010 #82

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/SxpOU ... 0&border=1

Just one puff and within 10 seconds up to 50% of our brain's nicotinic receptors
become occupied by nicotine. While most walk away from relapse thinking they
have gotten away with smoking just once, they soon find their brain wanting for more!
Want to keep your healing alive?
Just one rule ... none today!
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 12:12 PM - Jun 12, 2010, edited 2 times in total.
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lyndseyquits
lyndseyquits

6:35 AM - Jul 10, 2010 #83

This is a great post and a perfect reminder for me, just 40 days into my quit. A million thanks. 
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Joined: 7:22 PM - Nov 11, 2008

12:08 PM - Jul 13, 2010 #84

Email Received:  July 13, 2010
From:   Ivan
Re:  Feedback
Firstly - thank you. Its difficult to describe just how much finding your site has/is helped/helping me.  
I'm a 37yr old male from Liverpool, England who had his third heart attack last week. I've been addicted to nicotine since the age of 13. I had my first heart attack just under 10 years ago at 28 years old. My latest event has resulted in my 6th stent insertion. OK, I had a high cholesterol level up until my first attack 10 yrs ago (10.9 on the uk bad cholesterol scale) but it has been down to 3.5 since. (safe(ish) is said to be 5).
 
I did quit for over two years in 2000 but became ensnared again from smoking just one while drunk on holiday in 2002 and have been smoking 10 to 20 per day since. I knew what I was doing but couldnt understand why really. I knew that I'd probably have another event or probably die but couldn't either stop it or found it easy to convince myself that I would get away with it. Until now, after finding your site. Everything makes sense.
 
Basically you have given me hope by giving me knowledge. I feel that I can fight this now. It wasn't  the stopping that I found difficult (Being in a cardio ward hooked up to a wharfrin drip and ECG physically helped with that!), it was the months and years later that seemed to be the issue. I felt deprived. I dont feel or think of it like that now. I believe that now I have a hope. I didn't understand the nature of the addiction and couldn't figure out why I couldn't get away with the odd one here and there.
 
I just had to write to you and your team. If I can ever help with the crusade I will. I promise to promote your site at every opportunity.
 
Just wanted you to know. Your making a difference to many people globally. God bless you.
 
Ivan
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RogerDonaldson
RogerDonaldson

9:35 PM - Jul 27, 2010 #85

WOW, this is a good thread.
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

2:13 AM - Sep 02, 2010 #86

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Johnnie
Johnnie

3:58 PM - Oct 20, 2010 #87

Awesome thread, indeed. But I suspect that if the full stories were told we'd hear that all long quits that fail were somehow sabotaged far in advance. No great Black Bird swoops down from the heavens stealing anybody's quit. This site is the ultimate good place to come to remind ourselves of two things: our good luck in quitting...and our responsibility to maintain the good health of our quits.
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jaysohn
jaysohn

9:03 PM - Nov 10, 2010 #88

Really emphasizes the importance of regularly checking in to the forum. I agree with Johnnie.  I have been fixating on cigarettes from time to time over the last couple weeks, I think hitting the 3 months mark is starting to really bring it home to me - that I truly have quit smoking.  Now that the withdrawal symptoms are gone, it's so easy to get complacent and entice ourselves into taking just 1 puff.  I have not relapsed, but I have thought about it a couple times.  I think not being active on the site only encourages complacency.  I'm going to be sure to continue to take it one day at a time, not getting caught up in months, or years of my quit, but keeping it simple: NTAP, just for today!

Jason
Free and Healing for Three Months, One Day, 15 Hours and 3 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 6 Days and 12 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1873 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $516.94.
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Joined: 2:04 PM - Nov 13, 2008

10:18 PM - Nov 10, 2010 #89

"[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]I have not relapsed, but I have thought about it a couple times"[/font][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]I suspect you thought about having a cigarette more than you thought about relapsing, at least in the sense of thinking about it as something you want to do. Read these two strings:[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]"I think I have decided to go back to smoking"[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]"I made a conscious decision to smoke."[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Comment fron that last string:[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF].......when a person has a bad moment and relapses saying to themselves that they made a conscious decision to smoke, it is usually an untrue statement. They don't make a conscious decision to smoke; they make a conscious decision to have a cigarette. These are two completely different decisions. It is easy to make a conscious decision to have a cigarette, when you think that is where it will end. Thinking in terms of limited quantity or limited time smoking is fantasizing about smoking. This fantasy will be a person's downfall.Now in fact you are being forced to make a decision. Your body is going to demand it. The decision now is are you going to be a full-fledged smoker, under the criteria above, or are you going to quit again? If you don't make a decision and take action, the decision is already made. You are a smoker again. On the other hand if you decide to quit, then you may have to put up with the initial withdrawals and the struggles that accompany stopping smoking. Neither option is optimal, but one, as bad as it seems, is clearly better than the other is. One may be miserable; the other is potentially lethal.

You started your post that this was the worst day of your life. If it is the day you go back to smoking, this may not be an inaccurate assessment. If it is the a day you almost lost a quit but got it back and never smoked again, well then in retrospect you will probably realize that today was a day that had bad components. But in the grand scheme of things it was the day you permanently quit smoking and in that real sense it was a good day too. This may be hard to see now but in time, smoke free time; this may become a very realistic assessment.

This is a fight for your health and your life. Give it your all because the alternative is cigarette smoking and if cigarettes are given the opportunity, they will take your all. To keep your Freedom, your health and your life you must understand that your quit is contingent on knowing that to stay smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel

[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Video that ties in well with this string:


Video titleDial UpHigh SpeedMP3 AudioLengthAdded
Who wants to go back to smoking?2.61mb25.9mb3.22mb07:0509/28/06
[/size][/font]
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Johnnie
Johnnie

5:19 PM - Nov 19, 2010 #90

Thanks for the vivid reminder of the perils of forgetting what all of us know for a fact: NTAP.
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Krissy
Krissy

8:47 PM - Jan 04, 2011 #91

I absolutely love this thread.  Allowing these "one puff files" and the knowledge from this site to flood back into my mind whenever I have craved has been immensely helpful.
I think this particular thread is my favorite, because it reminds me of how vulnerable I will always be.  I can never return to a state of non-addiction, and I can never trick myself into thinking I can take only one puff.  That one puff is the only thing separating me from full blown addiction, and I am fully aware of that now. 

My addiction will always be there awaiting my return if I go back, but I don't think it requires my being paranoid.  It doesn't mean I can't enjoy my freedom.  I don't have to act like it's stalking me from around the corner and think about it all the time, but I do think I need to have a general awareness that the addiction is still there, especially if I entertain the thought of a cigarette for more than one second.  I actually enjoy acknowledging that I'm vulnerable because it means that I refuse to plead with or convince myself like I have in quits before.  Those quits were unsuccessful for a reason.  Now, I squelch the thought at it's root.  Don't even allow yourself to think about it, and the thoughts will cease much faster.  NTAP!! 

Krissy - Free and Healing for Ten Months, Three Days, 12 Hours and 20 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 21 Days and 11 Hours, by avoiding the use of 6190 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $2,037.65. 
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Joined: 7:22 PM - Nov 11, 2008

5:55 AM - Jun 23, 2011 #92

[P]eriods of abstinence following a lapse are typically short-lived: nearly every smoker who lapses eventually relapses (Brandon, Tiffany, Obremski, & Baker, 1990; Chornock, Stitzer, Gross, & Leischow, 1992; Garvey, Bliss, Hitchcock, Heinold, & Rosner, 1992).
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JulieS
JulieS

5:27 PM - Oct 04, 2011 #93

I too am living proof that ONE PUFF means total relapse.  I never believed it!!!  until I lived it.  I had quit for 16 years and then started up again 2 years ago...aaaggghhhh.  Like one of the quotes listed -- I had to HIDE from family and friends for quite a while.  How in the world do you admit this kind of stupidity?    So thankful to be free and on the other side again.  KNOWLEDGE is POWER.  Thank you Freedom!   One is always too many and 1000 never enough!!
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engben
engben

6:59 PM - Sep 21, 2013 #94

It is good to read the archives. There is much to learn from peoples success and failure. I never want to smoke again! Sitting here free of nicotine for 44 days is a good start, and that is all that it is. The drug is powerful. It almost scares me to read posts from people who have been off the drug for years only to relapse. I do not want to make that same mistake. I never want to go back to being a smoker! There is still much to learn....one day at a time. Today was a great day. I did not smoke.

Thanks Joel and all of the staff for what you do.

Regards,
Ben
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