The One Puff Files

Retraining the conscious mind
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Nov 2003, 23:24 #41

Bob,
Thank's for bringing this thread back up ~ just the reminder I need to hold tight to this quit ~ I know my life depends on it. I can't for the life of me understand why I went back to smoking on more than one occasion. I've been quitting for 25 years! Let go of a 2.5 year quit in '80, an 8 year quit in '92, and another 2 year quit in '99. These were not "slips" ~ they were defiant "I'm going to smoke now" relapses.

Just from hanging around this group for a few weeks, I know that I can Never Take Another Puff and I'm beginning to wonder why I would ever want to. For this junkie, that is great progress!

Thanks for all you share on these boards . . . . . back to reading the thread . . . . .
God Bless,
Candi - Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 11 Hours and 43 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 3 Hours, by avoiding the use of 330 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $42.90.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

09 Nov 2003, 00:18 #42

"In July of this year I turned Gold. 12 months of Freedom. Everything I was told here came true. No longer thinking about smoking, total comfort and vastly improved health. I threw it away and relapsed. One other thing is also true. You're one puff away from 2 packs a day. I very quickly returned to my old nicotine consumption level. Just like that." As one of the individuals quoted in OBob's original, "One Puff Files" I have always been frightened by this thread. Not because it speaks about relapse, but because it reminds me of the blazing with which a relapse can occur.

One moment, Quit for 14 months, a split second later an actively feeding addict.

There is no such thing as, just one puff for we, the addicted. That one is all it takes. Your addiction cpmes full bloom and your ability to rebound becomes even tougher as ypu despair over your relapse. There's no negotiating, no, "let's make a deal.' That Quit is gone, kaput, finis. And you must begin again. If you can.

Your Quit requires education, determination and focus. Constantly. Your relapse requires nothing but a split second of doubt.

Always hold your Quit tight. Always keep it in front of you.

Please.

Gormo Coupla days shy of 14 months Quit
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

09 Nov 2003, 01:02 #43

Hi Freedom,
I just read the entire thread ~ Bob did a super job putting it together. I recommend that anyone who has not read it to please take the time and read it while it's "at the top!"

For a chronic relapser like me, I could relate to so much of what folks shared. I especially related to someone who said "It's only temporary" ~ seems to me I said that once after a relapse. I'll just smoke until . . . . . . . . . then it is totally taken out of our hands.

Thanks, too, Gormo for adding your share to the thread this morning . . . .

Never Take Another Puff . . . . . . .

Candi
Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 13 Hours and 22 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 3 Hours, by avoiding the use of 331 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $43.08.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

26 Nov 2003, 08:02 #44

I come back here often and read this, if only to reinforce over and over again what I now know, one = all. I thank God for this place and for all I've learned here. Our quits are otherwise fragile. They require regular strength training.

Thanks for updating this thread!

, Sarah ( 1 Year, 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 8 hours, 21 minutes and 17 seconds (509 days)).
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

06 Dec 2003, 06:39 #45

I needed to post to this thread tonight. To remind myself of where I have come from and to add to the testimony that INSISTS........never take another puff.

I'm not to good on dates or the exact order that things happened. I couldn't tell you the number of times that I have tried to quit. But I can recall some of the circumstances in which I took the one puff .........that always (see above) becomes the one long extended daily puff of a coast to coast steam train addict!

Here's one from the early years. It could probably go into the (attempted) divine intervention thread that I have seen elsewhere.
.......A great weight had been lifted from my shoulders and I felt inspired to stop smoking as well. Two or three days into the quit I was at the park with my youngest boy (he was about 18 months old). The damage had probably already been done as I had bought a packet of cigs on the way there (undoubtedly blocking my mind at the time to the feelings of shame and worthlessness as well as to the voice of reason)...................................or was there still hope? As my boy played with a small ball I opened the packet and put the cig in my mouth...... but as I lifted a lighter to resume my flirtation with death and slavery a projectile (my sons' ball) flew threw the air and........quite precisely broke off the tobacco section of the cigarette leaving me with the filter tip in my mouth.........SAVED!!!!!!!!............? ...........surely?
.....Well, no................after giving my self esteem a final kick in the ribs (though I did ponder the situation for a few seconds) .....I took another cigarette out of the packet and resumed my smoking for at least the next 10 years (give or take a few more quit attempts).

The quits I have made in this time have lasted usually a few days or a couple of weeks. On two occasions I have stopped for about 3 months. A number of occasions I have been drawn back by starting to smoke cigars.....even when I knew where this would inevitably lead me......this path of repeated failure, as everyone knows, eventually leads to a terrible sense of hopelessness and desperation, whatever might be happening in the rest of your life.

This brings me to my last and probably wimpiest, most pathetic attempt at quitting made a few weeks before this, my final quit. (I am not trying to tempt fate or to be a man of iron here.....I just cannot afford to think or speak in any other way....this is my final quit). From the divine intervention (failed) of one of my earliest quits, we travel to an even more depraved picture that I am sure many of you can unfortunately identify with.....

........I throw tobacco in the bin as on several previous quit attempts............ I go to bed.............
...and next morning, like the most God forsaken dog returning to the filthiest vomit.....I retrieve enough tobacco from among the usual kitchen waste (use your imagination for this one if you have to) to roll a few smokes...... before I officially start my next stint of slavery by buying another packet.

It has been commented that many millions of people have stopped smoking without the benefit of this web site. I salute their courage and wisdom. A few weeks after the above quit attempt (????), desperate, depressed, but sort of wiser I decide (again) that I must quit. Something makes me look on the internet for help and I find this site. And as I read, the penny drops. I finally add the 2 of my experience to the 2 of yours and for the first time I get 4. I am an addict.......I will always be an addict.........therefore.......I must Never Take Another Puff..........and the road to recovery and healing began!

DAVID - Free and Healing for One Month, Four Days, 21 Hours and 49 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 15 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1047 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me £78.66.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Dec 2003, 22:43 #46

I lost my very first quit through just one puff! I was at work having lunch with a co-worker in the breakroom of the company where we worked. We got to talking and he was smoking (this was back in the days when you could still smoke in the employee "lounge"). I remember finally saying to my co-worker "Give me a cigarette!" and he did. I had been quit for about 3 months at this time (but I had quit because the girl I was dating asked me to and we had long since broken up) but by the end of the day I had bought a pack of my own and was back into my addiction. Except for a couple of short-lived quits I would smoke for the next 11 years before I made another really serious effort at quitting.

I often ask myself "WHY did you ever start up again?" but by now I have realized that beating oneself up over the past is a pointless exercise. Besides, there are no guarantees that I would not have started again at a later time, although as time went on the chances would surely have decreased. All I can do now is to learn from my mistakes, thank God for giving me the strength to quit now and the support of this group to stay quit, and stay determined, today, one day at a time, to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Dec 2003, 22:47 #47

Forgot to post my stats!

yqb, David One month, five days, 45 minutes and 11 seconds. 630 cigarettes not smoked, saving $47.29. Life saved: 2 days, 4 hours, 30 minutes.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Dec 2003, 03:47 #48


How long does a relapsed nicotine addict spend each day in either thinking about feeding their addiction, in actually doing so, or in getting to an acceptable location where they can do so, or in planning to do so, or in looking for lost cigarettes or that extra pack or their lighter or an ashtray, or in traveling to their supplier to buy yet another pack or carton, or in disposing of all their empties, or in cleaning up the ash or trying to get rid of the smell?

Think about how many times you would have smoked nicotine today verus how many subconscious crave triggers you encountered today. Which was less? Don't blame what you're feeling on where you're going (home) but on where you've been (nicotine's slave).
Only one rule, no nicotine today! John
 
Last edited by John (Gold) on 04 Apr 2010, 22:41, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Jan 2004, 11:42 #49


The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 30 Aug 2017, 23:40, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Jan 2004, 11:24 #50

Canadian Government's Addiction Warning Label
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Jan 2004, 08:30 #51

From: UKMags1 Sent: 1/16/2004 11:13 AM
My last successful quit lasted 10 years! Oh yes...I was a non-smoker for 10 years. I had smoked a pack a day for 10 years before embarking on that quit and I was thoroughly proud of myself for quitting. I can honestly say that I did not think of myself as an ex smoker but as a non-smoker. Having said that, I had given up on National No smoking day here in the UK and as that anniversary came round every year I would stop & remember what I had achieved and quietly celebrate it with myself. Not only did I not think about smoking or want a cigarette but I actually HATED it when other people smoked. I hated the smell of it on them and especially on my clothes after a night out. I can remember hanging my leather jacket outside for 2 days to get rid of the smell of other peoples cigarettes at a wedding reception I had attended.
With all that you may ask how did I ever start again?
It was simple. I took another puff.
It was a ridiculous moment when I was feeling a little stressed about something and a smoking friend lit up and just for a second I thought "Hmmm...that smells good" and at that point I made the fatal mistake of reaching for that cigarette and taking a drag! Of course it tasted absolutely disgusting and made me feel VERY ill. And I thought yuk..why did I ever do this? And of course I had to take another cigarette to try to remember why i had ever done it. And another and another in an effort to recreate that aaaahhhh feeling which would explain to me why I had ever been a smoker. And by the time I got that aaaahhh feeling of course it was too late. I was addicted again and my TEN YEAR QUIT was down the toilet!
Words cannot explain how I felt about myself! I had to admit to family members that I had started again. My husband and his family had only ever known me as a non-smoker and, as a family of non-smokers themselves, they found it quite horrifying. Worse than other people's opinions of me has been my opinion of my self for the last 3 years. Not a day has gone by that I have not HATED myself for starting again. I have HATED this little white stick in my hand that has held me hostage for another 3 years after I thought I had broken it's grip. I had always considered myself to be fairly intelligent, yet how could that be the case when I had done something as stupid as that.
Now of course I know why.
This quit is only 2 weeks old but I know now that the answer is simple. I can use the excuse that I broke that 10 year quit thru ignorance of the true power of my drug of choice.
If I break this quit there will be no excuse. I know the answer and the choice is mine.
My advice to everyone on this website is this, for what it is worth.
Never Take Another Puff.
Don't think you will be different or that you can get away with it 'cos you can't. Thinking that way cost me a ten year quit, my self esteem, God knows how much damage to my body, approximately £2300 in donations to the already rich tobacco companies and a fortune on prescriptions for asthma inhalers. It's not worth the risk so don't take the risk.

Maggie
I have not used any nicotine for 2 Weeks 1 Day 11 Hours 58 Minutes 48 Seconds. During this time I've left 154 evil butts in their packs on the shop shelves at a saving of £33.32. I've reclaimed 12 Hrs 54 Mins 57 Secs of my life to spend with my beautiful children who, hopefully, will not now smoke themselves. I will never take another puff.

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jan 2004, 05:59 #52




The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 15:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

07 Feb 2004, 22:17 #53

I want to bring this to the top because I've gone "green" today and was beginning to think that maybe I could have just one...........

......but I can't and I'm so glad to have this place to remind me, and this thread is a fantastic reminder of that.

Thanks again to everyone who contributes.

Sandra
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Mar 2004, 03:03 #54


The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 15:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:17

10 Mar 2004, 03:28 #55

Wow. This is such powerful stuff. Thank you Parker for recommending this thread for me. It really hit home. I cannot take a puff. Ever. One day at a time for the rest of my life.
Dandy
59 Days
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:04

10 Mar 2004, 06:59 #56

This is my favorite thread so far, as it addresses what I sense is my biggest vulnerability...thinking I can handle that occasional smoke. This thread is pretty convincing proof that it can happen to anyone, anytime. NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

I'm only 8 days into this quit, but I already know my weakness, having been there before. This time I KNOW I can never use tobacco in any form again. I'm only one drag/chew away from being what I was just 8 days ago. Lord, give me strength.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

15 Mar 2004, 21:43 #57

Hi laura
I brought this one up as i am having difficulty adding threads at the moment,you might have read it already.
Rickdabler 1 year 6 days 10 hrs happily nicotine free.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

06 Apr 2004, 00:47 #58

You know, I think this is going to be a favorite thread of mine. I think all of us at one point or another, nurse the thought of maybe being able to have another puff or smoke. I wish it was as known a fact as it is that Alcolholics can never have another drink. I pray I never lose the battle with quitting smoking. As long as I NNNTAP
Kathleen
I've been quit for 1 month, 3 days, 13 hours, 23 minutes and 39 seconds (34 days).
I've not smoked 503 death sticks, and saved $221.79.
I've saved 1 day(s), 18 hour(s) of my life.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Sep 2004, 23:44 #59





The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 15:40, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:17

21 Oct 2004, 06:21 #60

What a great string!!!!
OBob, you are the man!!!!
Thank you very much for this wonderful compilation.
And thank you BillW for bringing it back to the top.

YQB
Luis
Free for 29 days.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Dec 2004, 03:31 #61



The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 15:41, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jan 2005, 04:21 #62

From: OBob-Gold Sent: 12/31/2004 3:51 PM
Just keeping all the installments on the front page...

INSTALLMENT 2....

(Joel's reply)
Contrary to the opinion above, you cannot light a cigarette for another person unless you are fully prepared to going back to smoking yourself. You are a drug addict and you can easily absorb enough nicotine through your oral mucosa to cause a relapse. The same phenomena is seen in people who puff on a cigar after quitting smoking cigarettes. Even after years or decades of total abstinence, that seemingly innocent action has caused many to relapse to full-fleged smoking again.

(My note) This was the person's final post at Freedom, (almost a year ago), after being a fairly regular poster. Draw your own conclusions as to why.



More from the vaults...


The ironic thing is, that I gave up for 7 years and then started again ... with just that one puff. Now, four years on from that first puff, I am trying all over again. For some reason - this second time around is so much harder. Honestly - the first time for me was pretty much a walk in the park (I was smoking 30 a day for 8 years), and went cold turkey without a problem - I was SO determined. I guess I was lucky ..... I wish that I had not risked that good luck by taking that first puff again four years ago. All fine in hindsight huh ......



My most successful prior quit was many years ago, CT (no OTC NRT at the time), and lasted nearly three weeks, until I thought that just one puff would see me through and help me continue my quit! Ugh! I wish I had read this information back then.

I won't go there because been there, done that. (I wasn't a member of Freedom at the time - but almost the exact same thing happened to me. You however, are much, much, stronger than I was. It took me 8 years after a successful year of not smoking, then relapse, to finally find Freedom.)


So last month I tried to quit cold turkey and made it 7 days. The cravings were driving me nuts and I just couldn't take it. I had one puff..... then one cigarette.... then in a day I was back up to my normal pack a day. .


His first quit with me lasted well over a year. He took a cigarette one day and didn't get hooked--actually puffed away ever now and then for a few weeks before losing it. He basically inspired my letter the lucky ones get hooked. I lost contact with him a few years back--at that time he was still chain smoking. He had at that point smoked on and off again close to 20 years after that first relapse after having once been off for a year.



I quit once 5 years ago (for 14 months) when I was pregnant with my 2nd child (I smoked during my 1st pregnancy 5-10 cigs a day). I was sure I had beat my addiction so I would have 1 cig. occationally. It took about 3 weeks to return to my previous level, and several more quit attempts to reach this point.


Oh, and in case you were wondering, everyone here is right when they say, over and over again, that there is no such thing as "one cigarette" for an addict. It is interesting to note, that as I lit that first cigarette, I was surprised at the taste. It tasted just like the first cigarette I EVER had…do any of you remember that? NOT a pleasant taste. Plus, I began coughing almost immediately. Not to mention the TREMENDOUS LOSS OF PRIDE I felt rushing out of me with every puff. With each cough I felt weak, (cough, COUGH)…and worst of all, I felt beaten; BEATEN by a "little piece of paper filled with 4,000 chemicals". For anyone out there romanticizing that "one cigarette" I hope that you can listen to me when I say, that is a horrible, HORRIBLE feeling.

In three short days... I "enjoyed" five packs of cigarettes…just a little MORE than I smoked prior to my quit. For the record, that's one hundred attempts at getting back that "ahhhhh" feeling (and I never DID get to that point), a total of about $25 dollars wasted in one short weekend, and all of my healing DOWN THE TOILET! I was amazed when I woke up on Saturday morning and looked at myself in the mirror. First of all, I was greeted that morning with the FULL EXTENT of my smokers' hacking cough (uuggghh), and as I gazed at myself in the mirror I actually thought, "My god! I look terrible". All of the gray seemed to have rushed back to my complexion. My gums were red and I swear my teeth looked even more yellow than before I quit. I could not even stand the smell of myself. I spent the night before with my family, getting disappointed looks every time I went to light up. My parents and two sisters, who have all successfully quit, were looking at me with THE MOST disheartening looks. I felt like the biggest failure…and to be blatantly honest, I was.



Two years ago I stopped smoking for approximately 5 months. That had nothing to do with Freedom or Whyquit, I didn't even know they existed then. Then I relapsed at a friend's wedding; feeling too sorry for myself as I watched my friends smoke. Of course, this meant that I then had to spend another two years smoking and yet wishing I didn't


I have not smoked I have not smoked since my first post 5/11/01 on mothers day. RECENTLY I lit up a CIG FOR A FRIEND WHO WAS BLEEDING PROFUSELY ,,,THE MEDICS WERE ON THEIR WAY,i SPIT OUT ALL SMOKE PRIOR TO IT'S TASTE AND SMOKE HITTING MY LUNGS,AND GAVE IT TO HIM.....bUT I STILL HATED MYSELF FOR COMING SO CLOSE TO A puff....
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Recommend Message 12 of 58 in Discussion
From: marty (gold) Sent: 10/3/2002 3:00 AM
Just on the subject of that last quote in Bob's post, the woman who lit a cigarette for a friend, I know the person concerned and can positively confirm that she relapsed within a few days of the event.


From: Joel Sent: 5/16/2003 4:13 AM
Just to comment on the example Marty listed above, the person didn't actually relapse within a few days of the event--she relapsed at the moment she stuck a lit cigarette in her mouth. She just didn't realize that she relapsed until a few days of the event.

Smoke does not need to be brought into the lungs to induce a relapse. Nicotine can be absorbed through many routes. Through the skin as is evident by the use of the patch, and by the oral mucosa as evident by the gum. Lighting a cigarette or putting a cigarette in your mouth will cause the absorbtion of nicotine and that absorbtion is administration of nicotine to your body and administration of nicotine is a relapse.

Trying to rationalize it or define it as anything else is going to kill a quit and killing a quit can very likely end up in killing the quitter. The only way to guarantee staying totally smoke free is to know that they only way to avoid relapsing is to never administer nicotine via any NRT route and as far as for burning tobacco the only way to avoid relapsing is to never take another puff!

Joel

INSTALLMENT 3....
My message is---- It is oh so easy to start again, beware!!! I have quit many times, mostly without the help and info that is now available,and usually on a whim, New year was a favourite!!
My best attempt was for a year in '83 with a group working along the lines that Joel teaches. This was good and I felt I had it beaten!! Then one morning at my place of work I "borrowed" a cigarette from a friend. I could have just the one couldn't I? I had it licked, **** I'd been quit for a good year. Of course this quickly became a practice in my morning routine. As time went on my guilt kicked in and I thought I really was being a little cheeky taking one every morning from this friend, I bought him a pack, and upped my quota to two or three a day!! Naturally this led me back into the addiction that I thought I had licked!!
The point being as Joel relentlessly tells us all---- just one puff is all it takes!!!!!
I have steadily been trying to quit, roughly every two years since then.




In fact, I quit smoking just a couple of months ago! I went about 4 days. Then I took a puff. "Just one won't hurt me," I thought, knowing all the while that I CAN'T control how much and how often. I KNEW that one puff would lead to more, but I gave in and bummed one off a friend. ****, I gave up 4 days and had to start at zero again. Might as well buy a pack and control my smoking to only two a day. Yeah, right! Finished the pack within two days and was back to 1.5 packs a day again. Lesson: Joel's TRUTH, "Never Take Another Puff"



as you know I was nicotine free for 16 years and all it took was ONE PUFF......for the addiction to nicotine.......for 3 years!!!!!! I REMEBER THE FREEDOM.....I had those 16 years, the last 3 years have been miserable.....



I don't even remember how I got addicted again! I started at around 19 yrs old and smoked for 10 years, quit for 3 years, then started to just smoke socially on week-ends for a year until it started to sneak into my week. So stopped for 3 months and then...I can't even remember the first puff...it's all a blur!
So the strange boat that I'm in is that my first quit was alot like everyone's here, everyday was a struggle, after chores, after eating ..etc..but I somehow trained my body to only smoke when I'm socializing and especially drinking..it started off with just on Saturday nights, then both week-end nights, then during the day..and then for some reason, during the work week I could "manage" my cravings. Oh yeah, towards the end, I was using the patch during the week. I think I was becoming addicted to the patch too! But recently they have started to get too strong and annoying , plus my week-end smoking wasn't fun anymore b/c it was getting in the way of everything and it was driving me crazy to manage my cravings. Also, the nicotine I was addicted to this time were in these cute little cigerellos, so it didn't seem like real cigarettes.




I had smoked for about 15 years and then quit for 7. Everyone was so proud of me, it felt great. Well, I was stupid and TOOK ANOTHER PUFF five years ago and began my addiction all over again, only this time I had to be in hiding, how could I tell my family and friends that I had started up again?



During my last quit, before freedom, I found myself in the same situation. It was a year later, I was studying for finals, with the same friend. Her smoke curling around my nose. I thought if I smoked one I would go back to smoke free bliss. It didn't work. Before I knew it, I was back to my old level. I knew nothing about the power of addiction.


I visited one of my customers this week and while I was there she asked her son for a cigarette. I said "I didn't know you smoked". She said "well I had quit 20 years ago and this old friend came to visit me and we had some giggles sharing a couple smokes. Ya know, I can't seem to stop buying them now...". That was a 20 YEAR QUIT THAT SHE LOST!!!! It's never, ever, ever, ever, OK to take another puff for us addicts. Did I stress NEVER!!!

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2005, 09:08 #63



The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance, at the old level of use or greater.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 15:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

03 Mar 2005, 22:31 #64

No nicotine today. Not one puff. No matter what.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Mar 2005, 23:04 #65

Is Canada's addiction warning label accurate?
If 90% of smokers are chemically dependent under DSM III mental health standards is smoking highly addictive or extremely addictive?
Do nicotine addicts smoke cigarettes or instead smoke nicotine? Like the heroin addict's needle, isn't the cigarette simply our drug deliver device?
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