The Joy of Smoking

Physical healing of the body and mind
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Nov 2001, 21:05 #21

Truth
Attitude
Patience
Understanding
Enjoy your recovery! It's very temporary!
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Apr 2002, 10:00 #22


Nicotine was in control for all of my adult life and a big chunk of my teen years. Becoming the boss again has been very special and the calmness and comfort that arrived was more wonderful than I'd ever imagined! The joy of smoking, slavedom, decay, and a 50/50 chance of dying 15.5 years early? Not this kid! For me, for now, just one day at a comfortable time, it's the Joy of Living!

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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jun 2002, 22:08 #23

The Weekend is Here!
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Last edited by John (Gold) on 21 Nov 2009, 00:54, edited 1 time in total.
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jess SILVER )
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:02

11 Jul 2002, 03:19 #24

Thanks for all the great words to contemplate Zep. "The Joy of Smoking" is perfect!!! Just this morning I looked at a woman smoking in her car with a tiny bit of envy. I managed quickly to remind myself of the realities of smoking, and what it is doing to that poor poor woman. And then your post really reiterated that for me. Thanks!!!

Jessica
Day 8 - no puffs!
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Slycat
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

11 Jul 2002, 03:46 #25

Hi John:

The people that you described are everyday people. What I mean by that is that we see these people and are around these people everyday. These people are our neighbors, our family, our work friends, etc...Maybe you never noticed it before, but now since you gave up that deadly nicotine habit you are starting to realize what they are doing to themselves. Yes they all have a story to tell, just like we did. The only difference between them and us is that we have admited that we have a problem and that we are addicts, and they don't want to admit it unitl it's too late. We are giving our bodies a second chance. A chance to heal and a chance at a second life. And if we are lucky, maybe the damage we did all those years can be reversed... But they are in denial. They don't think they have a problem and they come up with every excuse in the book not to think about it. They push it aside until like Arthur, the ultimate danger is staring them in the face. Than it is too late. The deadly addiction will claim their life.

Yes, my aunt Jean was one of those every day people. She was a school teacher. The doctor told her it was too late when she quit smoking. He said the damage was already done....

My grandfather was one of those everyday people. He got lung cancer when he was 49 years old.. so young... He was a chain smoker and never realized what he was doing to himself.. I never got to meet him.

My father was one of those every day people. He started smoking in the War. Smoked his whole life more than 40 years when he finally quit. He has quit now for over 20 years. He just turned 78. He has also had a heart attack. What do you think????

My sister is as ordinary as they come. She just turned 48 and she is still smoking. I have tried everything to help her. She has asthma and was diagnosed with the starts of emphaysema and takes steroids when she can't breath... What do you think??? I mean she has cut down to 2 cigarettes a day and she thinks it's great....

So what do you think John... Yes these are ordinary people in our lives everyday.....

Judy

11 weeks+
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jul 2002, 06:02 #26

I have a sister with emphysema who may still be feeding from a clean patch, Judy. You're right, they're just regular folks like us who, during their youth, messed with what may be the most captivating substance on earth.

A couple of hours ago I finished a presentation to a group of senior citizens and I watched their jaws drop in disbelief as they heard the dependency statistics for different substances and learned the common thread between each. They just couldn't believe that nicotine, without intoxication or a "high", was really so addictive. No one had ever taken the time to teach them. I think that they each left with a bit different outlook on smoking.

We knew some of the health risks but I doubt that any of us realized that our little peer acceptance experiment, period of rebellion, or attempt to look adult, would be permanent. If we do nothing else, let's each be sure and share the truth with the young people around us! Sorry about your losses Judy. For many here this is an extremely personal issue that reaches far beyond just our own quit.

Thanks Jessica! I used to think the guy puffing away at the light was just being a tease but then I realized that he didn't even know I'd quit : ))) There was no one to impress in his car but his radio and it didn't appear to be listening! It didn't matter where we were or what we were doing, when the time came to feed, we fed!
John (Zep) - The Gold Club
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Aug 2002, 08:40 #27

The thousands of ahhhhh memories inbeded deep within our mind belong to a drug addict who was in need of a fix and got one. Within ten days to two weeks our brain was chemically adjusted to the complete absence of nicotine. It was all psychological after that. There is nothing missing and nothing left to replace. Our ahhhhh memories of filling an empty tank no longer belong to us.

All relapse will bring us is a mouth full of smoke, dizzy, three shades of green and a possible cough but no ahhhhh. We'll be temporarily deprived of our expectation. That sensation is reserved for the active addict in need of more. But it'll be too late. We'll either think we got away with our puff or keep digging within that pack or possibly the next until wel get the ahhhh sensation back but with it the truthful realization that it arose because of a new chemical need. Few of us smoke nicotine because we liked smoking. Once enslaved, we smoked nicotine because we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Nov 2002, 21:50 #28

The Joy of Destroying Your Ability to Breathe?
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"When you can't breathe nothing else matters!" American Lung Association
Last edited by John (Gold) on 21 Nov 2009, 00:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Slycat
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

14 Nov 2002, 03:12 #29

Hi John:Image

Continuing my post from the last time I answered your Thread on 7/10/2002 I must say some things have changed....

I can now add a couple of people to my previous List:

My Uncle Joe died last month of Lung Cancer and
My sisters ex-husband Joe died of a massive heart attack at age 50 a couple of weeks ago.....

Yes, these were ordinary people

Judy

6 months, 2 weeks++++
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Nov 2002, 01:12 #30

We're each doing our best here, Judy, but sadly the victim's list just keeps growing, and growing and growing. It's horrible. Your sister's former husband was far too young and losing any loved one to tobacco, at any age, is sickening. But then, we're each ordinary people too and we're not out of the woods yet. We gambled with our lives and the risks were tremendous. Some folks feel that we take quitting to seriously around here but I just don't think that's possible : (
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