John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:05 PM - Nov 14, 2001 #21

Truth
Attitude
Patience
Understanding
Enjoy your recovery! It's very temporary!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

10:00 AM - Apr 19, 2002 #22


Nicotine was in control for all of my adult life and a big chunk of my teen years. Becoming the boss again has been very special and the calmness and comfort that arrived was more wonderful than I'd ever imagined! The joy of smoking, slavedom, decay, and a 50/50 chance of dying 15.5 years early? Not this kid! For me, for now, just one day at a comfortable time, it's the Joy of Living!

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

10:08 PM - Jun 21, 2002 #23

The Weekend is Here!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 12:54 AM - Nov 21, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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jess SILVER )
jess SILVER )

3:19 AM - Jul 11, 2002 #24

Thanks for all the great words to contemplate Zep. "The Joy of Smoking" is perfect!!! Just this morning I looked at a woman smoking in her car with a tiny bit of envy. I managed quickly to remind myself of the realities of smoking, and what it is doing to that poor poor woman. And then your post really reiterated that for me. Thanks!!!

Jessica
Day 8 - no puffs!
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Slycat
Slycat

3:46 AM - Jul 11, 2002 #25

Hi John:

The people that you described are everyday people. What I mean by that is that we see these people and are around these people everyday. These people are our neighbors, our family, our work friends, etc...Maybe you never noticed it before, but now since you gave up that deadly nicotine habit you are starting to realize what they are doing to themselves. Yes they all have a story to tell, just like we did. The only difference between them and us is that we have admited that we have a problem and that we are addicts, and they don't want to admit it unitl it's too late. We are giving our bodies a second chance. A chance to heal and a chance at a second life. And if we are lucky, maybe the damage we did all those years can be reversed... But they are in denial. They don't think they have a problem and they come up with every excuse in the book not to think about it. They push it aside until like Arthur, the ultimate danger is staring them in the face. Than it is too late. The deadly addiction will claim their life.

Yes, my aunt Jean was one of those every day people. She was a school teacher. The doctor told her it was too late when she quit smoking. He said the damage was already done....

My grandfather was one of those everyday people. He got lung cancer when he was 49 years old.. so young... He was a chain smoker and never realized what he was doing to himself.. I never got to meet him.

My father was one of those every day people. He started smoking in the War. Smoked his whole life more than 40 years when he finally quit. He has quit now for over 20 years. He just turned 78. He has also had a heart attack. What do you think????

My sister is as ordinary as they come. She just turned 48 and she is still smoking. I have tried everything to help her. She has asthma and was diagnosed with the starts of emphaysema and takes steroids when she can't breath... What do you think??? I mean she has cut down to 2 cigarettes a day and she thinks it's great....

So what do you think John... Yes these are ordinary people in our lives everyday.....

Judy

11 weeks+
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

6:02 AM - Jul 11, 2002 #26

I have a sister with emphysema who may still be feeding from a clean patch, Judy. You're right, they're just regular folks like us who, during their youth, messed with what may be the most captivating substance on earth.

A couple of hours ago I finished a presentation to a group of senior citizens and I watched their jaws drop in disbelief as they heard the dependency statistics for different substances and learned the common thread between each. They just couldn't believe that nicotine, without intoxication or a "high", was really so addictive. No one had ever taken the time to teach them. I think that they each left with a bit different outlook on smoking.

We knew some of the health risks but I doubt that any of us realized that our little peer acceptance experiment, period of rebellion, or attempt to look adult, would be permanent. If we do nothing else, let's each be sure and share the truth with the young people around us! Sorry about your losses Judy. For many here this is an extremely personal issue that reaches far beyond just our own quit.

Thanks Jessica! I used to think the guy puffing away at the light was just being a tease but then I realized that he didn't even know I'd quit : ))) There was no one to impress in his car but his radio and it didn't appear to be listening! It didn't matter where we were or what we were doing, when the time came to feed, we fed!
John (Zep) - The Gold Club
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

8:40 AM - Aug 22, 2002 #27

The thousands of ahhhhh memories inbeded deep within our mind belong to a drug addict who was in need of a fix and got one. Within ten days to two weeks our brain was chemically adjusted to the complete absence of nicotine. It was all psychological after that. There is nothing missing and nothing left to replace. Our ahhhhh memories of filling an empty tank no longer belong to us.

All relapse will bring us is a mouth full of smoke, dizzy, three shades of green and a possible cough but no ahhhhh. We'll be temporarily deprived of our expectation. That sensation is reserved for the active addict in need of more. But it'll be too late. We'll either think we got away with our puff or keep digging within that pack or possibly the next until wel get the ahhhh sensation back but with it the truthful realization that it arose because of a new chemical need. Few of us smoke nicotine because we liked smoking. Once enslaved, we smoked nicotine because we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:50 PM - Nov 13, 2002 #28

The Joy of Destroying Your Ability to Breathe?
"When you can't breathe nothing else matters!" American Lung Association
Last edited by John (Gold) on 12:56 AM - Nov 21, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Slycat
Slycat

3:12 AM - Nov 14, 2002 #29

Hi John:

Continuing my post from the last time I answered your Thread on 7/10/2002 I must say some things have changed....

I can now add a couple of people to my previous List:

My Uncle Joe died last month of Lung Cancer and
My sisters ex-husband Joe died of a massive heart attack at age 50 a couple of weeks ago.....

Yes, these were ordinary people

Judy

6 months, 2 weeks++++
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

1:12 AM - Nov 26, 2002 #30

We're each doing our best here, Judy, but sadly the victim's list just keeps growing, and growing and growing. It's horrible. Your sister's former husband was far too young and losing any loved one to tobacco, at any age, is sickening. But then, we're each ordinary people too and we're not out of the woods yet. We gambled with our lives and the risks were tremendous. Some folks feel that we take quitting to seriously around here but I just don't think that's possible : (
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

10:15 AM - Jan 17, 2003 #31

Rougly 2,000,000 middle-aged victims each year
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MsArmstrongKIS
MsArmstrongKIS

3:15 AM - Apr 07, 2003 #32

Nice pic, John, except that in my town a pack of Marlboros is over $5!

Smoking is not a joy and the contentment that it brings to users is based purely on the comfort of staving off withdrawal for yet another hour or so. This morning I was eating my breakfast at the bagel shop I always go to, which is mostly staffed with young college girls like me. I noticed lately that almost all of them smoke.

I sitting doing homework and sipping away at my coffee when I overheard one of them say to the other, "Hey, I woke up this morning and found a whole carton of cigarettes in my closet, left when my ex moved out. How awesome is that?"

"That's happiness," her friend agreed. "Morning coffee and a whole carton of smokes. Lucky you."

Can you believe that I felt a momentary pang of jealousy? I bet you can believe it! It takes a little while to recondition responses to things like that!

But there is no real joy in finding a carton of cigarettes in your closet. Only 200 more fixes to the unceasing cycle of withdrawal. That "deliciously deep" drag isn't joyful, it's desperate. And the end result is disease and death.

One free, found carton in the face of the thousands more she and all nicotine addicts will shell out money and health for throughout her and their addiction. Joy? Joy?

I love this one, by the way.
Alex
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 3 Weeks 2 Days 21 Hours 46 Minutes 47 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 830. Money saved: $207.63.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

7:56 PM - Apr 29, 2003 #33

Just a quick reminder to you recovering nicotine addicts who are now beyond that 10 to 14 day chemical adjustment period and toying with a new excuse to relapse - FORGET IT !
The millions of smoking memories that remain in your mind were created by a drug addict while they rode a 20 to 30 minute lifetime cycle of nicotine highs and lows. There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean, your body physically adjusted to the absence of nicotine and your chemical cycle of dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting smoke, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none, as nothing is missing!
You worked hard in journeying home toward "you" again and it would be crime to flush this amazing recovery like a toilet in exchange for addict's promise that can't be kept.
Freedom is primarily an education resource, simply a tool, which cannot be held responsible for being used, nor can it accept any blame for being ignored.
Freedom today is doable and can even be made inspiring if you will only dig deep in your mind and recall the full honest truth of what it was really like living an entire day - day after day - from fix to fix to fix to fix. Was that the "real" you or a chemical bond?
Go the distance! You've earned the right to see who you are. You've earned the right to experience entire days where the "thought" of "wanting" to smoke nicotine never invades your thinking!
Yes, those pesky thoughts are annoying and yes, it would be nice if they were no longer a chore but the remaining thoughts will soon start becoming almost laughable and the alternative is captivity, destruction and a 50% chance of dying an average of 14 to 15 years early.
There is no excuse for killing you and no chemical worthy of dedicating the remainder of your life to. Today we're free! Let the healing continue!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 1:02 AM - Nov 21, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

9:21 AM - Dec 25, 2005 #34

Living nicotine free
the way to bring yourself
True Comfort & Joy
Simply NTAP!

JoeJFree - from tobacco & nicotine for Eleven Months, Fourteen Days, 10 Hours and 4 Minutes, (348 days)
Not smoked 8710, and saved $1,754.03.

Reclaimed 30 days, 5 hours and 52 minutes to use as I Choose! NTAP!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:20 AM - Jan 07, 2006 #35

Bait
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

11:44 PM - Apr 11, 2008 #36

"Oh but to again share in the joys of smoking," you think to yourself, "to puff, to taste, to blow, then relax."
The joys of smoking???? Joy? Joy?!"
(end of opening paragraph in John's initial post)
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

8:19 PM - Oct 18, 2008 #37

From: John (Gold) Sent: 7/3/2003 1:13 PM
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

12:01 PM - Nov 08, 2008 #38

Christine: Don't look at that fantasy of a 'best ever'smoke. Look at ALL of them. Look at the whole picture with a real appreciation of what you are considering taking back into your life - Today. Tomorrow. Every single day. 20 or 30 or more. You take one you get them all. None of us, nobody, wants them all. Choose none. Choose freedom over feed-um. NTAP and live as you were meant to be - clean of nicotine.
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nomowrinkles
nomowrinkles

7:43 AM - Nov 11, 2008 #39

this was brought to the top because i was having a bad day. my bad day passed but to anyone who hasn't seen this post I recommend it. WOW
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EtherBunny73
EtherBunny73

8:40 AM - Nov 11, 2008 #40

Wow! Powerful read!

Thanks for bringing this one up - it fits right in with my thinking and is a great reinforcer.
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

12:46 AM - Nov 21, 2009 #41

From John's post above:

Freedom is primarily an education resource, simply a tool, which cannot be held responsible for being used, nor can it accept any blame for being ignored.
Freedom today is doable and can even be made inspiring if you will only dig deep in your mind and recall the full honest truth of what it was really like living an entire day - day after day - from fix to fix to fix to fix. Was that the "real" you or a chemical bond?
Go the distance! You've earned the right to see who you are. You've earned the right to experience entire days where the "thought" of "wanting" to smoke nicotine never invades your thinking!
Yes, those pesky thoughts are annoying and yes, it would be nice if they were no longer a chore but the remaining thoughts will soon start becoming almost laughable and the alternative is captivity, destruction and a 50% chance of dying an average of 14 to 15 years early.
There is no excuse for killing you and no chemical worthy of dedicating the remainder of your life to. Today we're free! Let the healing continue!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 1:03 AM - Nov 21, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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rosy
rosy

11:02 PM - Nov 28, 2009 #42



Although, to some extent, to do already have some external reminders of the damage we are causing but obviously enough is still hidden, to get away with the illusion of the Joy of Smoking...

Free & Healing
Rosy
Stopped Smoking for One Month, Nineteen Days, 7 Hours and 3 Minutes, by avoiding the use of 1660 nicotine delivery devices. Quit Day : 09/10/2009.
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nstevens
nstevens

3:48 PM - May 02, 2010 #43

John (Gold) wrote:
Just a quick reminder to you recovering nicotine addicts who are now beyond that 10 to 14 day chemical adjustment period and toying with a new excuse to relapse - FORGET IT !
The millions of smoking memories that remain in your mind were created by a drug addict while they rode a 20 to 30 minute lifetime cycle of nicotine highs and lows. There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean, your body physically adjusted to the absence of nicotine and your chemical cycle of dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting smoke, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none, as nothing is missing!
You worked hard in journeying home toward "you" again and it would be crime to flush this amazing recovery like a toilet in exchange for addict's promise that can't be kept.
Freedom is primarily an education resource, simply a tool, which cannot be held responsible for being used, nor can it accept any blame for being ignored.
Freedom today is doable and can even be made inspiring if you will only dig deep in your mind and recall the full honest truth of what it was really like living an entire day - day after day - from fix to fix to fix to fix. Was that the "real" you or a chemical bond?
Go the distance! You've earned the right to see who you are. You've earned the right to experience entire days where the "thought" of "wanting" to smoke nicotine never invades your thinking!
Yes, those pesky thoughts are annoying and yes, it would be nice if they were no longer a chore but the remaining thoughts will soon start becoming almost laughable and the alternative is captivity, destruction and a 50% chance of dying an average of 14 to 15 years early.
There is no excuse for killing you and no chemical worthy of dedicating the remainder of your life to. Today we're free! Let the healing continue!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John
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