The Joy of Smoking

Physical healing of the body and mind
Lynai
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:16

22 Jan 2001, 10:47 #11

I'll second leslie on this one, perfect timing. I tend to get jealous of smokers and loose my perspective on the reality of smoking..this is a perfect eye opener. I printed it out (is that okay?) to keep on hand. Thanks. LynaiImage
Last edited by Lynai on 21 Nov 2009, 00:51, edited 1 time in total.
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KatieMarie
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:16

22 Jan 2001, 11:06 #12

Ahhh! I need to hold onto this thoughT! Funny how my mind plays tricks on me. I have to keep reminding myself with this concept.

Everyone should recognize these stories for what they are, accurate descriptions of the reality of smoking. The joy of smoking was a fantasy. It was the agony of withdrawal that kept you smoking at the end, not the joy of a cigarette. The real joy is when you recognize what smoking was and when you can look back over the day and say you beat it again, not a puff in 24 hours. This is a joy that can be repeated day after day after day for the rest of your life. To keep celebrating the real joy of Freedom, for everyday for the rest of your life, simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel

Thank you Joel.

sincerely,

KatieMarie
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pheonix(SILVER)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

29 Mar 2001, 12:58 #13

Your so right guys, today I was driving to work, and thinking about the power of advertising, and how crazy we are. Who would believe that sane, intelligent human beings would:
1. Put a weed in their mouths, light it and smoke it.
2. Think that it is sexy to do so.
3. Smell like a dirty ashtray.
4. Have wrinkles way before time.
5. Knowingly take the risk of a very slow and painful death.
6. Pay incredible amounts of money for the priviledge of dirtying everything around them.
7. Risk the fact that their children will also do this. and in the case of women triple the risk of miscarriage.
8. Deny all of these facts, and make exscuses to stay smoking.
9. Ignore the fact that you are only addicted to nicotine for 72 hours.
10. Refuse to believe that quitting is easy, you just never take another puff.
No guys I did not break down and smoke I will never take another puff, no matter what. Thanks to you as well as my own efforts.
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marty (gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

29 Mar 2001, 19:56 #14

Powerful stuff, Zep
What is really frightening is how tiny the gap is between my perception of smoking the day before I quit and the day after, and yet how massive the difference in result between being a smoker and being a non-smoker.

I recognise all my old thinking and all my old excuses in your essay. Now all my thinking is easily crystallised into four simple words - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF

Marty
NOT A PUFF FOR 3 months 3 weeks 5 days : 1899 cigs not smoked : 6 days 14 hours added to my life.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 May 2001, 06:58 #15

It's time to be you again!
Do you even remember who you were before nicotine took control?
I think you're going to like you : )
You've let nicotine run things for long enough,
now it's your turn!
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jun 2001, 04:51 #16

I AM A DRUG ADDICT !!
Image
I've now read twice this morning where members still feel that they are simply suffering from a "nasty little habit." This may come as a shock to you but YOU ARE A DRUG ADDICT! That's right, look in the mirror and you'll see an honest to goodness drug addict looking right back at you! The phrase "nasty little habit" is just more junkie thinking. Such soft fuzzy words are used to self minimize the hard cold reality of being a nicotine addict. It's much easier to tell yourself that you just have a "nasty little habit." The warmth of the phrase is akin to that found in the painless word "slip."

Failing to use turn signals while driving is a "nasty little habit" and so is picking your nose, cracking your knuckles or even losing your temper. But, you will not experience physical withdrawal symptoms if all you are giving up is a "nasty little habit." Physical addictions create powerful habits but they do so by forcing each of us select patterns for the regular delivery of our addictive drug.

Your addiction fathered your habits, not the other way around! You wouldn't have developed a habit of sucking smoke into your lungs while talking on the telephone, or after a meal, unless something inside prior cigarettes had created the need to do so. Within 20 to 30 minutes of our last dose of nicotine, our blood nicotine level would fall to a point where we'd feel the need to replace it. That is NOT a habit!

It didn't not matter what we were doing at the time. If we were on the phone and we had not topped off our nicotine tank in the past 30 minutes, it would happen while on the phone. If your meal lasted for more than 30 minutes then the command for nicotine would come! If you took an hour drive, spent an hour being romantic, an hour in class, an hour drinking or if you'd been awake for an hour, it was time for another fix. Yes, we developed habits but not just for the sake of having habits. If we wanted to avoid full blown nicotine withdrawal, we had no choice!

Even when we do break free from the physical addiction that fathered our habits, we are still forced to deal with thousands of powerful memories of what it was like to crave nicotine. I wish it was just a "nasty little habit." Sadly, I am a nicotine addict!

Zep : (
Last edited by John (Gold) on 21 Nov 2009, 00:51, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jun 2001, 05:34 #17

Zep:

I just brought up a couple of posts reiterating the same concept. But cheer up a little. While its sad that you have to be a recovering addict, it is much sadder to be an actively using addict or an addict in the midst of withdrawal. These two states are down right pitiful.

A recovering addict is actually in a pretty good state considering those alternatives. Sometimes they see the importance of health and Freedom with a much deeper appreciation than a person who never had such a background. Never smokers can take not smoking for granted, that is a luxury they have. Recovering smokers are forced to remember and in a way appreciate and celebrate the fact that they have quit.

Of course I suspect that if everyone here could go backwards in time they would likely have done it differently and never have taken up smoking. But everyone must shoot for the optimal situation they can actually achieve, and that is to stay an ex-smoker. The way to do that is keep your commitment to yourself that you will never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jun 2001, 05:59 #18

I'm a happy ex-smoker Joel : ))) The above post is from many moons ago and I just used it again to bring the Joy of Smoking thread up in that MSN took away my itty bitty happy face icons and I needed something. It doesn't hurt one little bit being a comfortable reformed nicotine addict. There is only one rule that I must follow in order to keep my confort - NTAP !

I had an interesting weekend. My sister was up from Georgia and we spent some time together. She is two years younger than me but started smoking at 13 vs. me starting at 15. Well, anyway, early last year we tried hard to get her to quit and she even posted here twice but last I heard it had ended in relapse and she went into hiding from big (quit smoking) brother.

Well, it seems that Patty has quit smoking for six months now but has remained addicted to the nicotine patch the entire time, and she had it on when she arrived here in Charleston. We had a long long talk and I printed her out lots of nicotine materials. I don't know how this is going to end but when she left last night she'd been patchless for about 40 hours and seemed to be doing great. I've got my fingers crossed and I'll be checking on her as soon as the sun goes down. Sorry for the confusion about the above re-post : )))
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Aug 2001, 09:46 #19

Just how far would I be willing to go to protect my quit? Well, let me think for a second! If I was forced to make a decision between smoking one cigarette and eating three day old dog dung out of the neighbors yard, I'd eat the dog dung in a heart beat! It's a pretty sick thought but it's far better than relapse and that 50/50 chance of an early grave! I just don't think I have another quit left in me! Yes, I'd take my chances with the dog! LOL Don't try this at home! LOL
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KiimmyGOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

13 Oct 2001, 23:04 #20

When I first opened this string up I thought it was new. I was shocked to see it was first started about a year ago. I thought I had read everything at this site. I guess not. Well, anyhow, I just wanted to say I liked it. Maybe it's just me but it seems like these strings pop up at just the right time.

Kim

Seven months, four weeks, one day, 12 hours, 39 minutes and 46 seconds. 4347 cigarettes not smoked, saving $978.02. Life saved: 2 weeks, 1 day, 2 hours, 15 minutes.
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