Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

9:17 PM - Apr 24, 2007 #101

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

12:22 PM - Jun 04, 2007 #102

From John's Original Post:
"Quitting isn't a problem, it's a solution. Nicotine use does not relax stress, it only relaxes its own absence. No sooner did we use it than the amount remaining in our blood began to once again decline until the anxiety for the next fix caused the cycle to be repeated, again and again, until death would we have parted."

The Final Truth
Junkie Thinking
I'm an ADDICT! HooRAY!
Restoring volume control
Being Honest About Our Addiction
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

11:49 AM - Jun 07, 2007 #103

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

7:31 PM - Aug 17, 2007 #104

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

12:38 AM - Oct 02, 2007 #105

From: John (Gold) Sent: 10/6/2006 7:27 AM
Loss or Gain -
standing dread on its head
Are you quitting or recovering? Do you feel loss or gain. I do hope your reading here is bringing you to the realization that the real "quitting" took place on the day that our reason for starting to smoke became irrelevant - the day we lost the freedom and autonomy to simply turn and walk away.

For many it happened far quicker than then appreciated. Our brain's defenses attempted to desensitized the mind to one of earth's most potent toxins that by happenstance so closely resembled the body's acetylcholine molecule that it fit a host of neurochemical locks (receptors). Pumping out vastly more dopamine than normal the brain grew or activated millions of extra nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors in at least eleven different brain regions.

But, now any attempt to stop using nicotine would temporarily leave us with far more acetylcholine receptors than needed. We would briefly find ourselves de-sensitized to the flow of a host of our own neuro-chemicals. Upon beginning to sense and notice this numbed and de-sensitized state, wouldn't it be normal and logical to believe that we were leaving a big big part of us behind, that nicotine defined who we were, that without it we would not be us, and forever lost?

Depressed and reward-less anxiety. An explosion of tension sparked anger following the shortest fuse we may have ever known. Recovery? When happening inside the mind, how could this not be seen as "quitting"?

Understanding the recovery process and removing self-induced anxieties associated with needless fright about leaving "us" behind can make the mind's period of neuronal re-sensitization vastly less challenging. Throw in an appreciation of the importance of stable blood sugar and not skipping meals -- in learning to again feed ourselves now that nicotine is no longer our spoon -- and you might see transition as "recovery" even as it happens.

But recovery isn't just developing the patience to allow time for receptor counts to return to normal. It's about reclaiming numerous aspects of a life once drenched in nicotine, about picking up the pieces. It's about rediscovering that everything we once did while high on nicotine (our dopamine/adrenaline intoxication) can be done just as well or better without nicotine.

Our dependency feeding patterns conditioned our subconscious mind to expect nicotine at specific times or places, during certain events or activities, when with particular people or when encountering certain emotions. Some of us had more aspects of life consumed by our addiction than others but all making this journey home share a common thread, we're taking back our life.

We can dread or even avoid encountering our nicotine triggers. We know that each is capable of generating a mini anxiety panic attack lasting less than three minutes but, due to time distortion, feeling vastly longer (be sure and look at a clock). But following each crave episode we are rewarded with the return of another aspect of life.

There may be subtle distinctions between similar triggers that are nearly impossible to discern but the subconscious mind does not argue or debate. If it does not receive the expected result - nicotine - it quickly moves on. Our reward is that now another person, place, thing, time or emotion has been reclaimed.

Whether easy, hard or somewhere in-between, in order to keep the recovery process moving forward requires following just one guiding principle, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x7+)

Another article authored by John - Quitting or Recovering?

Change the way you look at things and things will start to change.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

6:42 PM - Oct 10, 2007 #106

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RobinS614
RobinS614

8:36 PM - Nov 17, 2007 #107

From above....

Please give yourself a chance to meet the real you again! You won't be disappointed! Like a healing broken bone, quitting is a process, not an event. It requires that we each develop a bit of patience when it comes to dealing with our dependency. It requires that we stay focused on victory here and now - hour by hour, just one day at a time!

Life's challenges have nothing whatsoever to do with once again becoming an active drug addict. See such thoughts and links for just how ridiculous they really are! We're each addicts too! The only difference is that we LEARNED to be patient with our healing so that we could once again meet the person we once were. We're going home! Patience!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!
John - Freedom's Gold Club
Related reading...
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

7:29 AM - Dec 26, 2007 #108

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

11:38 AM - Dec 31, 2007 #109

Whether easy, hard or somewhere in-between, in order to keep the recovery process moving forward requires following just one guiding principle, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x8+)

Another article authored by John - Quitting or Recovering?

Change the way you look at things and things will start to change.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

6:38 AM - Feb 04, 2008 #110

You CAN go home again.
We Have! Join us.
It's so good to be back 'home'.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

9:47 PM - Mar 31, 2008 #111

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Gump19690
Gump19690

8:35 AM - May 02, 2008 #112

Please give yourself a chance to meet the real you again! You won't be disappointed! Like a healing broken bone, quitting is a process, not an event. It requires that we each develop a bit of patience when it comes to dealing with our dependency. It requires that we stay focused on victory here and now - hour by hour, just one day at a time! ~~~John
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

5:01 AM - Jul 03, 2008 #113

There is no 'junkie in me'.
I fully recognize that the junkie IS me.
I decide to stay nicotine free....or not. It's always been my choice to use and lose....or not and be free. "I made a conscious decision to smoke." NOT some junkie - me. And it's me who chooses now to be free - for the rest of today by simply NTAP.

Joe J Free - GOLD - Free and Healing for Three Years, Five Months, Twenty Three Days, 6 Hours and 46 Minutes, while recapturing 237 Days and 23 Hours of my life , by avoiding the use of 34271 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $8,669.30.
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

5:56 AM - Aug 12, 2008 #114

From above:

If you're still having triggered craves or find your mind flooded in a sea of smoking related thoughts, keep in mind that this isn't how it feels to be the real "you" or to be an ex-smoker. This is how it feels during that temporary period of adjustment called "quitting" that transports each of us home!
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

6:52 AM - Sep 14, 2008 #115

Excerpt from above :

Quitting is our temporary stepping stone back to that deep deep sense of calmness and comfort that our minds' enjoyed immediately before nicotine took control of our lives.
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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

11:11 PM - Sep 20, 2008 #116

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Joined: 8:00 AM - Jan 16, 2003

10:41 PM - Oct 12, 2008 #117

Message #24 in this thread:
From: John (Gold) Sent: 9/17/2002 7:36 PM
Limbo-Land - Let's face it, it can at times be challenging being patient and allowing our healing to continue when WANT fills your mind and our recovery seems to have slowed to a snails pace. A couple of weeks either side of six weeks can sometimes be like no-man's-land, half way between being a smoker and being totally free. You realize that there is nothing to go back to, yet still you can't see the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow that Oldbies call "comfort." Although a far different form of challenge than those first few week, it's not uncommon.

In my mind it's sort of like sitting in front of a flower that has formed a bud and watching it day by day, hour by hour and sometimes minute by minute as you wait for the bloom. It's very normal to grow a bit discouraged. It doesn't hurt but then it doesn't feel good either.

In this no-man's-land we can still at times find ourselves thinking about the perfect cigarette but then we've also learned that after 10 days to two weeks that it's an illusion. Our body has chemically adjusted to living without nicotine and we quickly realize that we don't need nicotine any more than someone who has never smoked a day in their life. We know that if we did smoke our junky mind's "perfect cigarette" that our immediate reaction would be no different than someone who had never smoked at all. We'd taste hot nasty smoke with 4,000+ chemicals entering our mouth and lungs, we would probably cough and we might get dizzy. But that sense of relief that we were expecting would not come as their was nothing to relieve. We were clean and physically adjusted.

We still have tons of memories of what it felt like to have our falling nicotine level replenished but those are just memories of the way things used to be and they were created by an active addict fullfilling a need. They are the illusion that grows a bit more distant with each passing day, but not fast enough for a mind used to receiving the "ahhhhhh" feeling within 8 to 10 seconds of that next puff. Be patient with your healing! Your first day of total comfort is just around the corner!

Have you physically pushed your healing body to its endurance limits lately. If not, take five minutes and accept a new challenge. You'll feel the healing within! The flower continues to grow, the broken bone mends, the earth is turning at a tremendous rate, and nothing can stop the powerful healing inside your body and mind except one puff! Go the distance! You won't be disappointed! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

5:32 AM - Oct 30, 2008 #118

From above....

Please give yourself a chance to meet the real you again! You won't be disappointed! Like a healing broken bone, quitting is a process, not an event. It requires that we each develop a bit of patience when it comes to dealing with our dependency. It requires that we stay focused on victory here and now - hour by hour, just one day at a time!

Life's challenges have nothing whatsoever to do with once again becoming an active drug addict. See such thoughts and links for just how ridiculous they really are! We're each addicts too! The only difference is that we LEARNED to be patient with our healing so that we could once again meet the person we once were. We're going home! Patience!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!
John - Freedom's Gold Club
Related reading...
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

11:34 PM - Dec 04, 2008 #119

Whether easy, hard or somewhere in-between, in order to keep the recovery process moving forward requires following just one guiding principle, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x8+)

Another article authored by John - Quitting or Recovering?

Change the way you look at things and things will start to change.
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