The Isolation of a Widowed Smoker

The Isolation of a Widowed Smoker

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Jan 2001, 21:40 #1

I put this one under the topic heading "My New Life" but I think a more accurate title would have been "remembering my old life." It is crucial that we all remember life as a smoker. Only then can an ex-smoker truly appreciate the true gift of liberation and freedom they have given themselves. Life gets better on so many fronts it's hard to keep track of them all sometimes. But hard as it may be, keep remembering the past, comparing life now to life back then. It will make every smoke free day a precious commodity as opposed to being taken for granted. Those in the first few days are fighting with all your might, keeping up your resolve is of obvious optimal importance. Those with more time under your belt sometimes lose sight that keeping up resolve is still of great importance too. Keep your memory strong and you will find your resolve will stay strong to never take another puff! Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

28 Jan 2001, 22:02 #2

God Joel - this story is SO SCARY! - only because it is so real!-
I completely identify with it and it shakes me out of my complacency (how can I afford to be complacent at justover one week??) and reminds me how much smoking controlled my life from the minute I woke up until the minute I went to sleep! -and I tell you I would have had a cigarette in my sleep if I could have worked out some way to do it!! Not today though - Just for Today
I WILL NOT SMOKE and I'll NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Thanks Joel - big thanks
Maz
One week, one day, 1 hour, 5 minutes and 47 seconds. 201 cigarettes not smoked, saving $64.36. Life saved: 16 hours, 45 minutes.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Apr 2001, 20:21 #3

Sorry to bring this one up on a holiday weekend, but some of you may have practiced a similar lifestyle when you were smoking of rushing people out or rushing to leave yourself from get togethers that the only reason you could not fully enjoy the occasion was because you were restricted from smoking. Hence when they time came to choose between your family and friends or the need for nicotine, nicotine won. Life for some of you may have been very limited in the past because of your drug seeking behavior.

Remember life as it actually was and you will truly appreciate the great gift you have given yourself by quitting smoking. You have also given a gift to those closest to you--your time. More importantly though is the time you have given yourself--on a daily level where just seeking and smoking cigarettes were robbing you of time and more importantly, over a lifetime where cigarettes were actually taking away years or decades of potential health and eventually robbing you of years or decades of actual life.

Always appreciate what you have done for yourself by quitting and your continued success will be guaranteed as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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duncan
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:12

16 Apr 2001, 09:24 #4

Dear Joel - I loved this - I remember when my parents used to visit me and I'd shove down my lungs as many smokes as I could prior to their arrival - the most outrageously stupid thing about this was that I would declare to them often that I had greatly cut down on my in take of cigarettes - (never did it vary much outside 25 a day over 13 years ) - I must have smelled so strongly of smokes to them when they finally arrived - how could I have lied - how could I have deceived them - why did I do just as this old lady did and plan their departure for them, prematurely, just so I could smoke another cigarette - this is another case of cigarettes completely governing your lives in the saddest dimension - just the other day on this board, a new member named Jordan mentioned how he did this same thing - he missed out on time with family because he could'nt smoke around them - is'nt this something that so many of us can relate to - wow - thanks for this blessed reminder Joel ! Respect, Duncan
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Hilary (silver)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

16 Apr 2001, 14:05 #5

Hi Joel:
This is one of your strongest writings -- it was one of the first things I read when I found Freedom, before I joined. It would not be possible to rewrite the same scenario and have it ring so true. We've all been there and we've all let the drug rule our days. We've all learning to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF. Thank you, Joel.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jul 2001, 21:10 #6

Yesterday's parade showed that people here had many family members who were important to them. This letter illustrates how cigarettes will take your priorities away from your loved ones in order to sustain smoking. Every one of you that participated yesterday, as well as those of you who did not should recognize that smoking was risking your long-term relationship with every family member and friend you have on three fronts.

First, as this letter shows, by making your desire to be with them secondary to your to need to feed your addiction. Next, by shortening your time of being alive you are going to be taken away from them prematurely.

Third, you were affecting your health and endurance and eventually, even those times when you are in their presence, it may have been as an observer as opposed to an active participant, witnessing life on the side lines as opposed to being an active participant.

Whenever the thought of a cigarette occurs consider everyone and everything that you will be leaving behind. Now what is more important, your hopes of a momentary pleasure from a drug fix or your ability to share your lifetime with your loved ones? If the answer is the latter always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Jul 2001, 01:59 #7

I brought up a post earlier today about remembering what smoking was like at the end so that you would always remember that your current way of life is likely better than what it was when you were a smoker. This one illustrates what you life could have been if you hadn't stopped when you did. Just how much length of your lifetime and quality of your life were you going to sacrafice in order to sustain your addiction? If smoking is really looked at objectively, for where it was the day you quit and where it was heading if you had not quit, your likely choice will always be to never take another puff!

Joel
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wcsdancer (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:29

06 Dec 2001, 02:25 #8

Joel, Not wanting to live the life of a "closet smoker" anymore was the #1 reason why I quit smoking. The lies, excuses, avoidance, hiding, covering up, and the constant withdrawal I was in was horrible. Because I'm feeling more comfortable physically, I've been forgetting how bad it really was. Reading about the widow has given me a swift reminder. Thank you! I've been enjoying ALL family activities now for: 3w5d12h54s! *Candy*
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Dec 2001, 18:04 #9

Image With the holidays coming and social events possibly on the increase, this is a good one to reflect on when you are with family and friends and not hurrying to leave or constantly going out for a smoke. You can enjoy social events unencumbered by withdrawal and will so forever as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jan 2002, 07:21 #10

The true costs of smoking is more than just premature death--in many ways it is the premature loss of quality life that can even be more tragic. I noticed we have a few new members who are grandparents--I think they will relate to this one to the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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