The Final Truth

Retraining the conscious mind

The Final Truth

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Jul 2002, 09:36 #1

You made it! You learned to remain patient during the few minutes associated with wall-climbing type craves - you knocked them dead! You stuck with it for the full 72 hours it took to empty your blood of all nicotine - at last you were clean! Your healing and glory continued for the ten days to two weeks that it took your mind to adjust to chemically functioning without nicotine and all the other chemicals that arrived with each puff. You confronted and reconditioned each of your major psychological crave triggers, and you tasted your first day of total and complete comfort where you never once thought about having a cigarette, soooooooooo why are you still having days where you find yourself "thinking" about smoking nicotine? It isn't that you don't believe the law of addiction because you do. It isn't that you think you can take one puff and not experience full relapse because you've most likely "been there" and "done that" and know that it's true. So why are there still days during which you find yourself thinking about that "perfect smoke?"

A twenty year smoker who averaged a pack a day and took eight puffs per cigarette lit 146,000 cigarettes and sucked warm nicotine laden smoke into their lungs 1,168,000 times. Over one million puffs! Where do the memories of those one million puffs go after we quit smoking? Where are they now? How many of those one million puffs made our mind say "aaahhh" as they immediately helped restore our falling blood nicotine level? Where did all of our "aaahhh" memories go when we quit? Were they true? Did new nicotine bring us a sense of replenishment and stimulation thousands and thousands of times? Absolutely!

Although we often hated being smokers and our bondage, there is no denying that each of those 146,000 nicotine fixes helped, to some degree, to bring relief from falling blood nicotine levels that were beginning to deprive us of a level of dopamine to which we'd grown accustomed. Each of them were played a vital role in restoring us to a level of comfort upon which we had each come to depend. We created our own artificial sense of normalcy, our own addiction comfort level that each year required a bit more nicotine to achieve and sustain. Yes, each fix brought the addict in us a true sense of comfort (from the pains of our own addiction) and yes all those memories still remain, but one important thing has changed - our brain no longer has a chemical need for nicotine!

If you go back through old old Freedom threads and read all of the descriptions of relapses that occurred beyond week two, they almost all sound identical. They read like this, "I had a mouth full of smoke, I was dizzy and I coughed but I didn't get the sense of satisfaction that I expected." "It just didn't come!"

Those thousands of enticing memories in the relapsor's mind told them to expect a sense of relief and satisfaction" but their body had adjusted to life without nicotine and the "aaahhh feeling" was not there. Unlike when the memories in their mind were created, tImagehere was nothing missing and there was nothing that needed replenishing. So what happens next.

Well, sadly, most relapsors keep believing the once true memories still enshrined in their mind and keep searching inside the pack, or maybe the next pack, until their addiction returns in all its full blown deadly glory (along with the aaahhh feelings) and they can finally look in the mirror and say to themselves, "see, I was right, smoking did bring me a sense of relief!"

Until we fully appreciate that our memories of our "perfect smokes" were created during our endless cycle of our chemical dependency and that we must once again be active addicts in order to experience that same sense of relief, the memories of prior fixes will continue inviting us home! Yes, the memories are true but only for active addicts in need of their next fix!

One of the greatest challenges of psychological recovery can be in understanding who we once were and our true relationship to a true chemical dependency. Those aaahhh memories belong to an endlessly feeding nicotine dependent human who was in need a puff of nicotine. Isn't it time that you allowed yourself to let them go! Isn't it time to see each of them as evidence of your former bondage!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long - John : )
Last edited by John (Gold) on 05 Nov 2009, 01:50, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

SandyBob GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:08

23 Jul 2002, 21:00 #2

Great Post!

Thanks

SandyBob
5weeks,5 days +
Reply

SKFox
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:10

24 Jul 2002, 02:26 #3

Since I've quit, I haven't had the "Ahhh" moment that you speak of, but when I read something like this, I have an "Ah Haaaa" moment.... the light bulb is on.... and it rings true and reinforces my quit. Thanks for the Ah Ha moment!!!



~Shauna

2 months, 3 weeks, 1 day, 11 hours, 25 minutes.
Reply

SammymnGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Jul 2002, 05:12 #4

Wow, what an important reminder of our never ending vulnerability! A definite print-then-keep! THANKS. Sam
Reply

murphying (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Jul 2002, 08:32 #5

Good post John - just a reminder to me that there is just not one cigarette in this world that is worth giving up the way freedom feels!!

Ingrid
6 Months 3 Weeks 1 Day
Cigarettes not smoked: 10190.
Self esteem 100%
Reply

Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

26 Aug 2002, 01:23 #6

Those aaahhh memories belong to an endlessly feeding nicotine dependent human who was in need a puff of nicotine. Isn't it time that you allowed yourself to let them go!
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Nov 2002, 05:25 #7


Oh those aaahhh memories that may at times seem inviting were certainly true when created but they are the property of an actively feeding addict who was then in need of their chemical. As long as the world's nicotine supply remains outside of these bodies then the healing on the inside will continue : )
Reply

SammymnGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

28 Dec 2002, 04:29 #8

The cure for days of impatience. Or at the very least, a really good salve.

Image, Sarah (5 3/4 months)
Reply

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 May 2005, 01:24 #9

One of the greatest challenges of psychological recovery can be in understanding who we once were and our true relationship to a true chemical dependency. Those aaahhh memories belong to an endlessly feeding nicotine dependent human who was in need a puff of nicotine. Isn't it time that you allowed yourself to let them go! Isn't it time to see each of them as evidence of your former bondage!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 05 Nov 2009, 01:51, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jul 2005, 23:34 #10

No matter for how long nor how much tobacco you have consumed you have the ability to readily rid yourself of this self-inflicted opression. After roughly 3 million puffs, I can now look forward to a life of Freedom From Tobacco use & Nicotine Ingestion.
All because some guys on the internet took the time to explain how I could be forever free if I just Never Took Another Puff!
YOU CAN BE FREE TOO!! Image DO IT NOW!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 05 Nov 2009, 01:59, edited 1 time in total.
Reply