Tell a newbie how how many seconds a day you still want a cigarette

Retraining the conscious mind
starbirder
Joined: 19 Jan 2009, 06:47

02 Mar 2009, 20:24 #811

[font=&AMP]The question posed by Joel at the beginning of this Parade of posts is " also write down how many times or how many seconds or minutes in a typical day you really find yourself wanting a cigarette."
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[font=&AMP]Thinking is not wanting!!!! Wanting vs. thinking, is there a difference?[/font]

[font=&AMP]The question posed here is not how often you think about the past activity of inhaling tobacco smoke. How often do you really want to? Really, why would anyone Want to if you don't Have to? You can have them all back any time you choose.[/font]

[font=&AMP]Don't think you're living without someting of value or worth. Nicotine has no intrinsic value and adds nothing of value to living life. Celebrate living Free Of Nicotine. That is Truly Living. [/font] [font=&AMP]JoeJFree Gold Posted: 12/15/08 03:09 AM[/font]
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osabrava2
Joined: 28 Feb 2009, 23:47

10 Mar 2009, 01:53 #812

I actually did address the "wanting question" near the end of the post when I said "...and I don't want them [in my life for any reason] at all.
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Ouija
Joined: 19 Mar 2009, 05:42

06 Apr 2009, 06:32 #813

I'm going to be honest. As much as I hated smoking, there was a part of me that enjoyed it. Believe it or not, even after a 5 year quit, from time to time I actually do still think about smoking. And when I say think about smoking I mean in that longing, wish I could do it kind of way. Which is not often mind you. I'd say about 5 seconds every month or so if that. Give or take.

Don't get me wrong. I don't crave cigarettes, nor are these thoughts unpleasant in any way. Being the educated quitter that I am, I smile in these moments, quickly dismissing any notion of ever lighting up again. That choice is always of there of course but I never want to be hooked on nicotine again, nor do I want all of the problems that would go along with it. No way! Not smoking is a choice and a darn good one if you ask me.

So if you're an ex-smoker who still thinks about smoking from time to time, do yourself a huge favor. Add up the time you actually spend thinking about it. Before finding Freedom I once blew a two month quit simply because I had the wrong mindset. I had an urge to smoke one day and said to myself, "If the desire to smoke doesn't go away after all this time then it will never go away," totally ignoring all the time I had not thought about smoking up to that point and all the time I would have continued to enjoy not thinking about it had I not taken that first puff.

Thoughts, cravings, urges, etc are all temporary and really don't occupy much of your time at all. Do the math!

There are 60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour, 24 hours in a day, and 365.25 days in each year. 60 x 60 x 24 x 365.25 = 31,557,600 total seconds in a year. For the 5 seconds a month or so that I miss smoking there's approximately 31,557,540 seconds that I either don't think about it at all or am thinking about not smoking in a positive, appreciative, not missing it at all sort of way.

I spend 0.00019% of my current time thinking about smoking. Um, that's less than a second a day. Lol!

But how often did we think about them as smokers? My addiction forced me to think about them at least every 20 minutes or so. And if I didn't obey those cravings, the alarm bells going off in my head got worse forcing me to think about them even more, often to the exclusion of everything and everyone else around me.

My advice? Go ahead and think about them. Remember them fondly. Remember all of the negative aspects of being a smoker. But whatever you do think about them honestly. Smoking was enjoyable. Being addicted and HAVING to smoke even when you didn't want to however was not. When I honestly recall what life in bondage to a chemical was like, even if a puff on a cigarette was the most enjoyable thing in the world, would it really be worth living the addict's lifestyle again? Not to me. I'd rather move on with my life, keeping a few fond smoking memories amongst the many thoughts, reasons, and appreciations of letting cigarettes and therefore my addiction to nicotine go for good.

Don't be afraid. Have a few fond thoughts here and there alongside the memories of all the trouble this addiction has likely caused you. Why not? Thoughts good or bad have no power over your quit as long as you don't ingest nicotine. Just don't obsess about it. I wish I could tell you loathing your addiction, nicotine, or cigarettes is required but honestly its not. You don't have to be an activist to quit smoking. Once you've quit you just have to be smart enough to realize that ingesting any nicotine will likely re-addict you, and by never using nicotine in any of its various forms again you can move on with your life like I did spending 99.99981% of your time focusing on other things like collecting Ouija Boards.
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ccathy247
Joined: 21 Apr 2009, 02:43

13 Jun 2009, 16:20 #814

I have been quit for 2 Months, 3 Days, 12 hours, 10 minutes and 54 seconds (64 days). I have saved $64.50 by not smoking 1,290 cigarettes. I have saved 4 Days, 11 hours and 30 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 10/04/2009 12:00 AM

I don't remember the last time I "craved" a cigarette, felt I had to have one, needed one. Maybe the second or third week when I had to do something I really didn't want to do. Clean behind a stove and fridge. LOL

Maybe once or twice a day I might think of a cigarette. I usually smile and then say why did I just think of a cigarette? Typically someone or a thought has made me feel ever so slightly uncomfortable and I used to used nicotine as a distraction.

Just recently, because of the education I am getting from the board, I think great, I may think of one every day but I really enjoy not having to think about them 20 to 30 times a day!!!!!
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The intelligent quitter's strategy combines an understanding of the Law of Addiction
with well-protected core motivations.

Nobody ever graduates from Addiction

Cathy, Gold

[Quit April 10, 2009]
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jsg
Joined: 29 Apr 2012, 06:27

06 Sep 2014, 00:38 #815

I thought about smoking once in the second year of my quit. And it lasted maybe 3 minutes. That's about 57 microseconds per day.

This year so far... 0

NTAP!
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James - Free and Healing for Two Years, Four Months, Thirteen Days and 39 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 48 Days and 2 Hours, by avoiding the use of 13856 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,005.31.
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MauriceS
Joined: 09 Feb 2015, 10:36

11 Feb 2015, 04:26 #816

jsg wrote:
I thought about smoking once in the second year of my quit. And it lasted maybe 3 minutes. That's about 57 microseconds per day.

This year so far... 0

NTAP!
---------------------------------------------------
James - Free and Healing for Two Years, Four Months, Thirteen Days and 39 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 48 Days and 2 Hours, by avoiding the use of 13856 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,005.31.
0, that's great for you!
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