"Take it ONE DAY AT A TIME"

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 1st, 2002, 12:17 pm #11

There probably isn't a more important skill that any
of us can master than learning to take our recovery
just one hour, challenge and day at a time.
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 12:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 21st, 2002, 7:38 pm #12



Although all of my prior attemptss failed because I broke the law of addiction and took another puff of nicotine, the junkie thinking that my mind engaged in immediately prior to doing so varied from failure to failure. Although I learned a little lesson with each failure, there are so many relapse rationalizations to be overcome before graduating from the school of hard quit knocks, that many quitters simply run out of time and quit opportunities, and their defeat becomes permanent, cold, lifeless, stiff and final.

Although I used stupid reasons like it was time for a little reward for quitting for a whole day - just a couple of quick little puffs (always less than half a cig) - central to each failure was the simple fact that I had lost patience with the pace of withdrawal and recovery, that I failed to develop a one day at a time attitude that saw each hour, challenge, and day of quitting as a complete victory in and of itself.

Instead of successfully coping with those few moments prior to each relapse, I simply surrendured to them. I now know that no crave will ever last longer than three minutes (about the time necessary to smoke a cigarette). If I had only held out for a couple of minutes, the worst would have passed and my quit confidence would have been allowed to again re-build. Instead, I simply surrendered to a few anxiety riddled moments.

A one day at a time mind set asks each of us to focus on success for just here and now, the moments in front of us. If we are not successful over the next few minutes then we each know how we'll spend all the minutes, days, and packs that follow. Like a skilled cliff or rock climber, focus only on getting a good grip of the rocks within arm's reach. To worry about rocks that you can not yet reach or dwell upon how far it is to the ground below or the distance remaining to be climbed, does not help us at all in getting a good grip on here and now! We'll deal with tomorrow, tomorrow. It's here and now that matters! Now is the distance between here and success!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold)
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 12:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

May 25th, 2002, 8:57 pm #13

For those worried about a three day holiday weekend
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 31st, 2002, 10:25 am #14



Welcome to Freedom, where we celebrate each
hour and day of healing and each challenge overcome
as the full and complete victory each reflects!
Why worry about tomorrow today?
Here and now is all that matters!
Baby steps to glory!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 12:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 2nd, 2002, 9:19 pm #15

Baby Steps!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 12:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

October 24th, 2002, 9:26 pm #16

Last edited by Joanne Gold on July 11th, 2009, 12:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 7th, 2003, 9:06 pm #17

a new beginning
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 12:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

July 5th, 2003, 1:05 pm #18

This is such an important thread. The concept of One Day At A Time truly carried me through. I honestly quit for just one day and nothing more, that was all I could handle.
Really pay close attention to that concept and listen to what it really means.
4-1/2+ years and just for today...
Joanne
Last edited by Joanne Gold on July 11th, 2009, 12:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Rickgoldx5
Rickgoldx5

September 3rd, 2003, 12:59 am #19

One day, one minute or one hour just take it as you can. If you look at it as a life time you might get overwelmed. Your only given this day or this hour so make the best of it. Just don't smoke today. And I know it seems impossible now but one day, if you really want Freedom from cigarettes, you'll be sitting there and realize that for the first time in years you spent one day without one thought of a cigarette! It can happen if you just let it! One day at a time.
Rick
One year, three months, four weeks, one day, 4 hours, 43 minutes and 41 seconds. 38895 cigarettes not smoked, saving $9,704.48. Life saved: 19 weeks, 2 days, 1 hour, 15 minutes.
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

December 25th, 2003, 3:51 pm #20


Last edited by Joanne Gold on July 11th, 2009, 3:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

May 21st, 2004, 5:42 pm #21

It is important to understand the concept of such phrases as "One day at a time." These should not be thought of as just empty words or a catch phrase; the concept behind the phrase is key to keeping not smoking a less intimidating and more importantly--a likely outcome.
So whenever you use the phrases of "One day at a time" or "never take another puff," reevaluate the statement and see if your reasons are still valid. If you remember smoking in its entirety you will likely recognize that staying smoke free and healthy and alive is still your true desire and to keep your desire a reality you still choose to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 27th, 2004, 8:32 pm #22


Yes we can!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 3:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

October 27th, 2004, 11:05 am #23

It is important to understand the concept of such phrases as "One day at a time." These should not be thought of as just empty words or a catch phrase; the concept behind the phrase is key to keeping not smoking a less intimidating and more importantly--a likely outcome.
So whenever you use the phrases of "One day at a time" or "never take another puff," reevaluate the statement and see if your reasons are still valid. If you remember smoking in its entirety you will likely recognize that staying smoke free and healthy and alive is still your true desire and to keep your desire a reality you still choose to never take another puff!

Joel
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coryw42
coryw42

February 8th, 2005, 4:10 am #24

One day at a time, it's working for me
Last edited by coryw42 on July 11th, 2009, 3:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

May 1st, 2005, 8:37 pm #25

Every day the ex-smoker should wake up thinking that he is not going to smoke that day. And every night before he goes to sleep he should congratulate himself for sticking to his goal. Because pride is important in staying free from cigarettes. Not only is it important, but it is well deserved. For anyone who has quit smoking has broken free from a very powerful addiction. For the first time in years, he has gained control over his life, rather than being controlled by his cigarette. For this, he should be proud.

So tonight, when you go to sleep, pat yourself on the back and say, "Another day without smoking, I feel great." And tomorrow when you wake up, say, "I am going to choose to not smoke for another day. Tomorrow I will deal with tomorrow." To successfully stay free from smoking, TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

July 2nd, 2005, 9:13 am #26



Last edited by Joanne Gold on July 11th, 2009, 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

September 20th, 2005, 8:10 pm #27

It is important to understand the concept of such phrases as "One day at a time." These should not be thought of as just empty words or a catch phrase; the concept behind the phrase is key to keeping not smoking a less intimidating and more importantly--a likely outcome.
So whenever you use the phrases of "One day at a time" or "never take another puff," reevaluate the statement and see if your reasons are still valid. If you remember smoking in its entirety you will likely recognize that staying smoke free and healthy and alive is still your true desire and to keep your desire a reality you still choose to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 11th, 2005, 4:16 am #28

Forget about forever, the biggest psychological bite imaginable.
It's like sitting down to the dinner table thinking we need
to eat an entire cow instead of one nice juicy steak!
A new beginning, just one hour, challenge and day at a time!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 3:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 22nd, 2006, 10:20 pm #29

Every day the ex-smoker should wake up thinking that he is not going to smoke that day. And every night before he goes to sleep he should congratulate himself for sticking to his goal. Because pride is important in staying free from cigarettes. Not only is it important, but it is well deserved. For anyone who has quit smoking has broken free from a very powerful addiction. For the first time in years, he has gained control over his life, rather than being controlled by his cigarette. For this, he should be proud.

So tonight, when you go to sleep, pat yourself on the back and say, "Another day without smoking, I feel great." And tomorrow when you wake up, say, "I am going to try for another day. Tomorrow I will deal with tomorrow." To successfully stay free from smoking, TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 10th, 2006, 1:14 am #30

Baby steps!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 3:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

September 14th, 2006, 12:02 am #31

It is important to understand the concept of such phrases as "One day at a time." These should not be thought of as just empty words or a catch phrase; the concept behind the phrase is key to keeping not smoking a less intimidating and more importantly--a likely outcome.
So whenever you use the phrases of "One day at a time" or "never take another puff," reevaluate the statement and see if your reasons are still valid. If you remember smoking in its entirety you will likely recognize that staying smoke free and healthy and alive is still your true desire and to keep your desire a reality you still choose to never take another puff!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 30th, 2006, 4:24 pm #32

Focus on the Rocks Within Reach

Although all of my prior quits failed resulted because I broke the The Law of Addiction and took a puff of nicotine, the junkie thinking that my mind engaged in immediately prior to destroying my latest period of healing varied from failure to failure. Although many discover the law of addiction and the power of a puff through repeated failure and the school of hard-quitting-knocks, each year millions simply run out of time and opportunities before defeat becomes permanent, cold, lifeless and still.

Although I used stupid reasons like it was time for a little reward for quitting for a whole day - just one quick puff of nicotine that always turned into 3 or 4 - common to each failure was the fact that I allowed my original core motivations to be consumed by my dependency as I became impatient with the pace of recovery. Central to each was that I never once adopted a "One Day at a Time" recovery philosophy that viewed each day of freedom and healing as the full and complete victory it reflects.

Instead of successfully coping with those few moments of challenge prior to each relapse I simply surrendured to them. I now know that no crave will ever last longer than three minutes (about the time necessary to smoke a cigarette).

A one day at a time mind set allows us to focus on success for just today, the moments before us now. If we are not successful over the next few minutes then we each know how we'll spend all the minutes, days, and packs that follow. Like a skilled cliff or rock climber, focus on getting a good grip of the rocks within arm's reach. To worry about rocks that you can not yet reach or dwell upon how far it is to the ground below or the distance remaining to be climbed, does not help at all in getting a good grip on here and now! Deal with tomorrow, tomorrow while appreciating the tremendous importance of victory today!

The next few minutes are all that matter and each is entirely doable! Yes you can, yes you are, yes you have! We're each with you in spirit,

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!

John (Gold x7)
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 11th, 2009, 3:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joe J free
Joe J free

July 17th, 2009, 4:19 pm #33

Every day the ex-smoker should wake up thinking that he is not going to smoke that day. And every night before he goes to sleep he should congratulate himself for sticking to his goal. Because pride is important in staying free from cigarettes. Not only is it important, but it is well deserved. For anyone who has quit smoking has broken free from a very powerful addiction. For the first time in years, he has gained control over his life, rather than being controlled by his cigarette. For this, he should be proud.

So tonight, when you go to sleep, pat yourself on the back and say, "Another day without smoking, I feel great." And tomorrow when you wake up, say, "I am going to try for another day. Tomorrow I will deal with tomorrow." To successfully stay free from smoking, TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel



(Links below have been restored)

A Positive Affirmation
= "I am not going to smoke today!" = Success!
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redsunflower
redsunflower

June 19th, 2011, 10:07 am #34

How great to read this post again. It has been so significant and helpful in my quit. I thought I'd comment and reflect a bit on where I am right now with this idea of 'one day at a time'. 

At the beginning of my quit I hung on to this idea for dear life. I could not picture the next day never mind week, month or year with no nicotine so it had to be the manageable, bite-sized chunk of one day. Today, for one day, I will not use nicotine. Tomorrow needs to take care of itself for now. I would consciously remind myself in the morning that I would not smoke that day, and congratulate myself at night. And as a strategy, this worked very well for me. My quit stayed strong.

Today, I still use this idea but in a different way. I go days now, sometimes weeks,  without a craving then one appears. The time in between thinking 'I want nicotine' to thinking 'not today...one day at a time' has reduced to practically nothing. The first part is almost ceasing to exist as I move on so immediately to 'not today, one day at a time'. The two ideas have blended into one, even thought they seem to be opposing. Like the thought has become 'nicotine...none today'. So the cravings I do have are actually affirming my quit. Like, here's a thought about nicotine, and how you don't use it anymore. 

I'm sure this idea will remain helpful throughout my life. I'm wondering if how I use it will change again. Probably. Maybe it will turn into thoughts about how I'm a non-smoker now, I don't know.

Whatever, this idea is so powerful and so helpful when giving up this drug. Thanks once again, and as always, for the learning. 

Redsunflower - Free and Healing for Two Months, Twenty Six Days and 3 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 9 Days and 1 Hour, by avoiding the use of 2610 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me £261.94.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

October 17th, 2014, 11:42 am #35

Last edited by Joel Spitzer on October 17th, 2014, 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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