KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

September 16th, 2006, 10:52 am #76

For anyone that heard John's audio today and needs living proof that it's possible to go from addicted to free, just read these.
Kat
8 months +
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

September 23rd, 2006, 2:28 am #77

For Liz, and anyone else needing a boost today.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

October 22nd, 2006, 12:46 am #78

If this moment feels like a struggle, start reading through this thread. There is a great deal of inspiration in here. Every time you feel a crave, read some more. Make your way through the whole thing. I guarantee you will find your story in here. I guarantee you will find hope in here. I guarantee that comfort will come for you just as it did for me and so many others.

Give yourself the gift of this powerful journey into recovery.

No nicotine today. Not one puff. No matter what.

Parker - 4+ years
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

January 5th, 2007, 8:32 am #79

From: Starshinegrl-Gold Sent: 1/28/2006 3:14 PM
for all our newer members
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

January 5th, 2007, 9:01 am #80

Been a while since we added a Success Story. There's lots of 'em mind you, just have to put 'em in here. This is an especially good example to add tonight as a few of our newest members have mentioned they are dealing with anger issues relating to their nicotine cessation recovery process.

Need just a little help became

Message 173 in Kat's Quit January 2006 Journal.



It gets better - Much Better.
As my pal DivaMom said a while ago -
This quitting stuff gets better than better...it gets GREAT!
One Day at a Time, Patience, Stay Committed, Keep your reasons real and fresh, and NTAP!
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

January 9th, 2007, 11:08 pm #81

Our New Year's quitters have by now completed
Glory Week!!!!
Congratulations!!!!
The memory of this week is to be cherished, lest you are ever tempted to repeat it!
But It Gets Better, and this thread is the proof. We all have been where you are now, and with some faith, and some education, and some One Day At A Time... you can make your quit permanent, too. You too can achieve Freedom!
Read the whole thread: use the buttons at the bottom. Nothing you are going through is really new, and you will draw immense strength from the stories in this thread: stories of Victory!
YQB BillW Four years, eleven months, 1 hour, 7 minutes and 53 seconds. 53851 cigarettes not smoked, saving $10,501.02. Life saved: 26 weeks, 4 days, 23 hours, 35 minutes.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 8th, 2007, 8:47 am #82

If this moment feels like a struggle, start reading through this thread. There is a great deal of inspiration in here. Every time you feel a crave, read some more. Make your way through the whole thing. I guarantee you will find your story in here. I guarantee you will find hope in here. I guarantee that comfort will come for you just as it did for me and so many others.

Give yourself the gift of this powerful journey into recovery.

No nicotine today. Not one puff. No matter what.

Parker - 4+ years
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

April 5th, 2007, 9:39 pm #83

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

May 3rd, 2007, 5:47 am #84

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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

August 31st, 2007, 7:44 pm #85

A Freedom Classic has been Melissa777's

Days I just wanted to Die

For many of us, she captured the worst that we can go through early in a quit.


She has just dropped in to write another perspective, from nearly the five year point. I thought it made a nice set of "bookends" on a quit, so here it is!

It has been a long time since I wrote " days I just wanted to die"

See, It Will Get Better!

BillW 5.5 years and some
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

September 29th, 2007, 3:24 am #86

For Jakki
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Puh(BRONZE)
Puh(BRONZE)

October 1st, 2007, 10:16 am #87

You helped me so much back then. And now its been 5 years and its saved my life.

Thanks Puh
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

January 9th, 2008, 4:32 pm #88

OBob's "Living Proof" comments in his 6xGolding post made me think of this thread. I've never contributed to it, so here goes...


I can't believe it! I smoked for 25 years. It is no longer that I can't believe that I quit. It is now that I can't believe I smoked approximately 136,875 cigarettes! If I sat down and counted individual ones I remember, I might honestly, with some thought, mention a few hundred.

What I do remember crystal clearly is the fear I felt 4 years ago on December 23, 2003. I was terrified that I would ache for nicotine (and everything else in cigarettes) forever. A funny thing was that one reason I smoked for so many years was that I convinced myself that I could quit anytime. By the time I actually quit, I was convinced that I certainly would NOT be able to quit, or rather not be able to STAY quit,… OR at least not without lifelong PAIN and AGONY.

I quit anyway because I was exhausted and had been for almost a year. I ruled out almost every other possible lifestyle reason and was tested negative for all the common reasons a 41-year-old otherwise healthy woman might be thoroughly, horribly, exhausted.

I tried Zyban. It made me hyper. It didn't butt out my last cigarette for me either. It didn't even make me want to. I still had to butt it out myself. After a tearful phone call with my doctor about yes, having to actually do the butting out myself because the drug does not do it for you, I surfed the Internet. I found Freedom and later WhyQuit. I read for hours, all night, cried and cried (maybe because I had tired out my exhausted self so very, very much, you think?!), and I finally butted out at 5:30AM. Then I slept for a couple of hours before I started my day. I remember this all very clearly. I made it hard on myself because of my lack of faith, with my final admission that this is a drug addiction and that I did not know if I could quit it.

One day I will write my One Task At A Time addendum to the One Day At a Time and One Hour At A Time essays here at Freedom. That was how I made it through the first few days.
"I will just do the dishes. I can do the dishes without smoking. Doing the dishes. Doing the dishes. It is okay. Doing the dishes. Breathe."

Then I would acknowledge that I was still thinking about not smoking and would decide,

"Okay, I will just put these things away. I can put things away without smoking. Putting things away. Putting things away. It is okay. Putting things away. Breathe."
And onward I'd go.

It worked! I went from one Task at a time, to one Hour at a time, to one Day at a time, to finally just trigger busting as they cropped up.

I have learned that time is going to pass whether you smoke or not, so you might as well not.

I have learned that I was already having cravings and triggers many times a day while I was a smoker -- every time you want a cigarette, you are experiencing a craving or a trigger! They were not something new. I just stopped responding to them. And in time they were gone.

I learned here that living through cravings and facing triggers is how you heal the addicted brain. I Embraced the Crave! (Thanks, John!) I mean, I REALLY embraced the crave.

I also embraced quitting with a positive attitude. You can choose to be miserable or you can choose to celebrate every tiny victory. (Or I suppose, you can choose something in between. Just stick to your promise to yourself to remain nicotine free.)

What I consider my last official trigger was in October 2004, with fewer and fewer of them every month preceding that. Occasionally I THINK about the act of smoking and it usually just makes me laugh. Ha! No wait, I did have a trigger last summer, now that I think about it. I mean, I wanted to smoke for a picosecond. Then I laughed.

I haven't been exhausted for a long time. To celebrate it, I went on a very active holiday for my first Golding (my first anniversary)! I can't believe that was 3 years ago now! Wow!

I could never list the additional benefits that I have experienced. The list is too long.

One benefit of note is recovery from surgery. I had surgery last year (unrelated to any smoking related illness, thank goodness). "QUIT SMOKING" is bold and underlined at the top of every document my surgeon gave me. Smokers do not heal like non- and ex-smokers do. I healed as expected and didn't even have to think about that! That calls for another: Thank Goodness!

My darling Uncle Moe died of cancer last year. He was the kind of people this planet needs more of. What really broke our hearts was his confession, when discussing his years of smoking, he said, "I wish I had a second chance." I don't know or even want to debate how it is that I got a second chance and he didn't. I am no more tenacious than he is, nor smarter. I think mostly I just embraced the blind faith that he was never able to embrace. NEWSFLASH: (hindsight is cruelly 20/20) He quit the day of his diagnosis. He died knowing he could have quit all along. Oh that makes me cry.

Well this is much longer than I meant it to be (like so many of my posts).

I made so many dear friends here at Freedom while I approached comfort. Special thanks to Managers, all the contributors, and to everyone who keeps the place running.

Thank you to Newbies who remind me that I never want to go back.

When you see "Can't Find Member Profile", do not assume that person relapsed. I know so many ex-members and rare-posters who are still ex-smokers! One day you too will not cling to the words here either. Just read everything you can right now. Comfort is coming.

The time I spent at Freedom was the best investment I ever made.

Kay (Gold)
Celebrating 4 Years, 16 Days, 21 Hours and 19 Minutes of Freedom!
Forsaking 29558 rolls of burning toxic weeds and chemicals
has liberated $10,056.93 and 102 Days and 15 Hours of my life.

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

March 4th, 2008, 12:36 pm #89

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gally66
gally66

May 26th, 2008, 7:46 am #90

Thanks Kay. I have considered this one of the greatest threads on the internet; I have it listed in my bookmarks under a folder title - Great Messages. I also do not seem to have triggers or cravings very often any more. However, I do think about using tobacco quite often but I think that is my way of knowing I do not want to use it any more. If I was to forget about smoking and chewing, the day could come when I make a mistake because I was not aware of NOT SMOKING anymore.

Great wishes to everyone, and thanks for a wonderful two years (and I am going to continue counting).

Graham
Free for 2 years, 2 days after 50+ year not.
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

August 17th, 2008, 7:55 am #91

For Sherry today... or anyone else who thinks that Freedom isn't dearly bought, and totally worth it!

BillW 6.5+ years
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

August 23rd, 2008, 10:26 pm #92

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 10/21/2006 12:46 PM
If this moment feels like a struggle, start reading through this thread. There is a great deal of inspiration in here. Every time you feel a crave, read some more. Make your way through the whole thing. I guarantee you will find your story in here. I guarantee you will find hope in here. I guarantee that comfort will come for you just as it did for me and so many others.

Give yourself the gift of this powerful journey into recovery.

No nicotine today. Not one puff. No matter what.

Parker
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ZAREFAH
ZAREFAH

August 25th, 2008, 7:00 am #93

I don't spend much time at Freedom anymore although it is still one of the first links on my toolbar. My Silk Quit meter is packed away in my list of programs still quietly ticking. A few times a week I cruise over to Freedom and run down the list of messages on the board. I can easily recognize the newbies. It's all the oldies I see that I don't recognize that always surprises me. There are so many! And some are counting 5 and 6 years of Freedom! Of course there are always Joel's threads inserted, many of which I read a long time ago. The site really hasn't changed much. It is still committed to teaching cold turkey quit in a very serious manner. After all, many lives are at stake.

The second post of this thread belongs to me. When I read it now, I still remember how I felt when I wrote it. But I wanted to post now and let you know that although I can remember that night, it is now like a dream that I had many years ago. I can't remember when the last time was that I seriously considered having a smoke. It has been too many years. I have become a non-smoker, through and through and I will never, ever light one again. And how did I get to this place? The same as you are right now. One day at a time I lived without a smoke. I read all the information I could in the library and when I forgot I read it again. When I thought I might want to turn around and go back because it was getting too hard, I came to Freedom and posted. I promised myself that a long time ago. Before I would ever light one up I would come to Freedom and post. That is still the way it is.

If you are reading this now for encouragement, be strong. Hold on for one more moment because the desire will pass. The more moments you put between you and a smoke, the easier it becomes. The day will arrive when you suddenly realize you that not only do you no longer smoke but that you actually like yourself that way! And that day is much closer than you think.

Big hugs, Joy

Eight years, two months, two weeks, six days, 22 hours, 2 minutes and 32 seconds. 60078 cigarettes not smoked, saving $10,513.71. Life saved: 29 weeks, 5 days, 14 hours, 30 minutes.
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