Stronger or Smarter?

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Jan 2005, 22:42 #21

I saw a comment made by a new member about how stupid she felt for having ever been a smoker. We actually once had a string that was titled, "Proof smoking made you stupid." The title made sense because it was based on a newspaper article that used that phrase as its byline. The fact is though, once a person is starting to look into quitting they are proving that common sense is starting to take a grip here. We never want people to feel that they are stupid because we believe that people are going to have to use their intellect in order to quit. No one should ever feel that they are not smart enough to quit for in reality, quitting smoking is a pretty simple process--as simple as recognizing that to stay smoke free is no more complicated than sticking with your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel

Here is a comment I wrote in the string talked about above:
The title of this post bothers me a bit. If we are doing our job right getting the word out about www.whyquit.com, we are hopefully bringing in people who are currently smoking who are coming to read here looking for help. If one of the first post they see is one titled like this, it is going to give them the impression that we see smokers as stupid people. Nothing could be further than the truth.



Smokers are people who made a bad choice sometime in their life, but it is important to note that there is a really good chance they made that choice with very inadequate information. Also, it is likely that they took it up when they were young and when lots of people make improper choices.



When we are dealing with smokers of many decades, most of them took up smoking before any one really knew how dangerous it was. Even when we are dealing with young people just taking up smoking today, while they may have learned some of the dangers of smoking they likely have not learned the full magnitude of the problem and there is a real good bet that they never learned about the full power of the addiction.



I have personally known some very smart smokers over my lifetime. Some have even been rocket scientists, medical professionals, attorneys, owners of their own successful companies and basically people from all walks of life. Most of you know many of these people too, since they are our current members. These were people who were smart enough to correct a mistake that they made years and decades ago.



Actually, when I promote my programs I personally aim my ads to "Intelligent Smokers." (See Are You An Intelligent Smoker?)[font=ARIAL, HELVETICA, 'SANS SERIF'] I am going to pop that post up in a minute because I want to counter this post's title. I hope every person who is reading here who is still smoking realize that we don't see you as stupid. We see you as being smart enough to recognize that it is time to quit and smart enough to seek out information to help assist you in our quit. We also know that you have a great chance to succeed precisely because you are smarter than cigarettes and with the right information you can overcome the grip they have on you. (see the post [/font]Stronger or smarter?[font=ARIAL, HELVETICA, 'SANS SERIF'] ) The only piece of information that you must really learn and really believe is that to quit smoking and to stay free is as simple as being smart enough to never take another puff![/font]
[font=ARIAL, HELVETICA, 'SANS SERIF']
[/font]

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 10 Aug 2016, 21:59, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Mar 2006, 22:14 #22

I couldn't agree more with the "smarter not stronger" concept. Case in point, I played poker last night with six guys. Believe it or not even in this day and age four of them were constantly cutting out for breaks in the garage. Me and the other guy left behind got to chatting--once about smoking. He hadn't smoked in more than 20 years and then smoked anywhere from zero to three to 10 cigarettes a day for four to five years in his late teens/early 20's. I told him my story of smoking half a pack to a pack and a half a day for 20+ years.
He says " I can't even imagine quitting after having smoked as long as you did. You must be quite strong"
"Nope, I said. I'm weak, but the difference is now I know it. I'd quit many times before but this finally took when I realized I could never take another puff. Not one. Now that I know better, I do better"

NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF--or you'll end up (back) in a freezing, blue smoke-filled garage throwing your butts in a filthy coffee can stuffed with coffin nails, smelling nasty and on your way to one of two places: another tough quit or a tougher road to health problems and worse. Clearly this post was for me, so thanks for reading.

Andy
Smoke free for three years and three months and a few days.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Mar 2006, 01:51 #23

This is a great post. And this is so true. People often try to place quitting smoking in the same catagory as dieting (I used to). It's not the same and I agree not even close.

First of all, it's a physical and psycological addiction. Second, it's a final quit. With dieting you STILL eat something. We all know with quitting smoking, there's ONLY one way - NTAP!

When I try to explain that smoking is like a herion or alcohol addiction, sometimes people look at me like I have two heads (especially folks in their 60-80s). It's amazing how it's perceived as a "habit" or like a simple area of "self improvement". It a full blown chemical addiction that stinks!

Thanks for this post!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

01 Apr 2006, 09:03 #24

Protect your freedom, stay smart. Never take another puff!
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

07 Apr 2006, 10:01 #25

" I don't think I will ever be stronger than my addiction to nicotine. That's what I mean by being smarter than the addiction"
This has always been one of my favorite posts Dave! I am glad when I checked in tonight, it was "up". Very early on in my quit, when I realized that "I was NOT stronger than my addiction to nicotine, but I was smarter" it was one of those light bulbs that propelled me on to the next hour, day, week, month, year! It is good to check in. Take Care and NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF ! ! ! Katie (So glad and thankful to be free)
Katie - After 40 Years! Free and Healing for One Year, Five Months, Nineteen Days, 12 Hours and 42 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 31 Days and 16 Hours, by avoiding the use of 9121 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,865.02.
Last edited by Crystal View1.ffn on 27 Feb 2009, 23:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

19 May 2006, 05:09 #26

I just absolutely loved this and need to post it in my journal.

Thank you, Dave, for those words written so many years ago, but still so pertinent now. (And I am cracked up at the money-back guarantee you suggested earlier this year - absolutely priceless.

Maria - free for 1 month after 38 years
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jun 2006, 10:56 #27

From Above by Andy, who by now is 3 1/2 years + free of nicotine.

......... He says " I can't even imagine quitting after having smoked as long as you did. You must be quite strong"
"Nope, I said. I'm weak, but the difference is now I know it. I'd quit many times before but this finally took when I realized I could never take another puff. Not one. Now that I know better, I do better"

NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF--or you'll end up (back) in a freezing, blue smoke-filled garage throwing your butts in a filthy coffee can stuffed with coffin nails, smelling nasty and on your way to one of two places: another tough quit or a tougher road to health problems and worse. Clearly this post was for me, so thanks for reading.

Andy
Smoke free for three years and three months and a few days.

Meant to reply when you posted in March - Thanks for posting this. Another bit of ammo for the kit. JoeJ Free, a nicotine addict & ex-smoker for 1 year, 5 months, 15 days, 12 hours, 39 minutes and 34 seconds (531 days).
I've not smoked 13288 death sticks, and saved $2,716.54.
I've saved 46 days, 3 hours and 20 minutes of my life.
NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 08 Nov 2013, 01:12, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:40

26 Jun 2006, 22:58 #28

I can always start back tomorrow, I'll just not smoke today, etc

I feel really stupid right now. I know I've heard and everyone keeps saying 1 day at a time but I never completely realized what we were all talking about. This puts it into words. Like I said, I feel really stupid for not having gotten it sooner. All these days and the light finally goes on. lol

Kimm - Free of nicotine for One week, five days, 16 hours, 56 minutes and 57 seconds. 190 cigarettes not smoked, saving $52.41. Life saved: 15 hours, 50 minutes. Quit Date: 6/13/06 6:00pm EDT
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

22 Jan 2007, 12:20 #29

SMARTER!

aunt valeria
I have been quit for 10 Months, 3 Weeks, 5 Days, 2 hours, 49 minutes and 59 seconds (332 days). I have saved $913.31 by not smoking 6,642 cigarettes. I have saved 3 Weeks, 2 Days, 1 hour and 30 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

23 Jan 2007, 00:29 #30

love this one.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Feb 2007, 22:20 #31

Strength vs. Weakness?
or
True Dependency vs. Dependency Ignorance?
We knew lots about how to smoke. Heck, we were experts!
But, sadly, I knew hardly anything about the chemical
that kept me enslaved, and even less about breaking free.
I was ignorant, not stupid.
I needed someone to teach me the law of addiction.
Instead, for 30 years I battled in darkness.
Why?
Last edited by John (Gold) on 08 Nov 2013, 01:12, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2007, 04:04 #32

Nicotine addiction can be defeated, but not by being stronger. We can be stronger MOST of the time, but not ALL of the time. That's what I mean by we have to be smarter.
Way to go Dave: 5gold / 31 anniv. / 55y
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 22 Jun 2009, 17:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

13 Sep 2007, 21:06 #33

We will never be stronger than nicotine nor do we have to be.
It is our ability as humans to reason that allows us to overcome urges to reach for a cigarette for relief from cravings or to recognize that we are thinking of a cigarette because we are experiencing something we associate with nicotine consumption. There are many triggers to overcome in the beginning.

We overcome our addiction not by will power but by being smarter. Not by being smarter than nicotine, but by being smarter than we were before we found this website. Quit with your brain it is much easier than quitting with your brawn.

Joseph
Gold x2
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

12 Oct 2007, 21:16 #34

Never take another puff. Words to live by!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Nov 2007, 04:54 #35

According to a 1990 study, what percentage of quitters who lapse and sneak just one "taste," or one little puff, will thereafter experience full relapse and complete failure?

A. 93%
B. 73%
C. 53%
D. 33%
E. 13%

The correct response is A. The study was entitled Borland, R, Slip-Ups and Relapse in Attempts to Quit Smoking, Addictive Behaviors, 1990, Vol. 15, pp. 235-245. Among 339 quitters who tasted tobacco, including those who were unsuccessful in not smoking for even one full day, 314 would experience full and complete relapse.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2008, 19:28 #36

Saw where a new member was not sure if they were strong enough to maintain thier quit. Well, in honor of Dave's recent 6xGold post I thought it would be better to let 'ol Hillbilly Dave explain why it is our smarts - not our strength - that makes the difference in effectively controlling our addictive relatonship with nicotine.
I rate this article Six Gold Stars.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2008, 20:12 #37

Thank you for posting this string again JoeJFree... it is some of the best advice gleaned from the rational approach to quitting.

Recently, on the eve of green, I was convinced quitting was too difficult for me, that I was not "strong" enough... but I stuck it out, reminding myself that "that is addiction talking, not you". I kept telling myself that, and forced myself to wait it out; and, within 24 hours, the addict's thoughts backed off. I won that battle by being "smart". It was hard, because the addiction IS stronger, but addiction turned out to be no match for reason. What's more: I have had great days ever since that battle! As though the addiction has given up trying to get the better of me, or I have gained hope since getting the better of my addiction...

Ilona
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:09

18 Apr 2008, 20:51 #38

Hi Joe
Just wanted to echo llona, battling addiction is like David versus Goliath. We can't win on strength, but we can win by smarts .

Joanna - Free and Healing for One Month, Twenty Two Days, 23 Hours and 6 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 17 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1079 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $262.30.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 May 2008, 22:06 #39

Other posts that raised the issue of being stronger or smarter:
From the thread "Maybe I am different"
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Recommend Message 9 of 111 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 3/6/2001 9:49 AM
I hear in some posts that little voice in out heads giving us messages. Don't pretend the voice doesn't exist, just acknowledge it and remind yourself of what you are doing. You did not initially take control of your addiction by being stronger than nicotine, you did it by being smarter than nicotine. Your little voices know how to get around an prey on your weaknesses. Those voices can only gather strength when you lose your resolve and you will only lose your resolve when you lose your focus. But they can never get around you when you are prepared and mentally ready for them. You will get stronger and more secure as long as you stay smarter. You will also stay stronger if you constantly reaffirm your desire to say free and keep reinforcing your ammunition and resolve. Remember smoking for what it was, appreciate your freedom for what it is. Keep doing this and you will be happy to never take another puff!
Joel

From the thread Carrying cigarettes
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Recommend (1 recommendation so far) Message 2 of 158 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 3/16/2001 8:00 AM
I know I just had this one up a couple of days ago, but it really is an important one. So many people lose quits because they really miss the importance of this one. Keeping them to show you are stronger is a pretty strong sign that you don't appreciate just how strong the addiction is. You won't win this battle by being stronger than nicotine, you will win it by being smarter than nicotine.
If you keep them around to help in case of emergency, you are still looking at cigarettes as good things with mystical qualities of helping in crisis. As many have said here before, a relapse does not help any crisis, it is a crisis in its own right, one that in almost every case is bigger than the one leading you to take the cigarette. Because the crisis of a relapse can eventually take your health and then take your life.
Stay focused on the fact that you are quitting because you want to, because you want to live a long and healthy life. To accomplish both goals always remember to never take another puff!
Joel
Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Created
"I know I will quit smoking!" 2.37mb 23.5mb 2.98mb 06:30 09/29/06
Last edited by Joel on 27 Feb 2009, 23:32, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Jul 2008, 21:49 #40

Strength vs. Weakness?
or
True Dependency vs. Dependency Ignorance?
Nicotine has an IQ of 0.00, we are SMARTER....get your EDUCATION AT FREEDOM/WhyQuit.com
Never Take Another Puff!!! Your worth it....
Star 364 days of Living, Laughing and Loving every day with a smile
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Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 17:54

14 Feb 2009, 19:27 #41

Education is a quitting method. Stay free, stay smart.



The One Puff Files
Last edited by SalGold on 27 Feb 2009, 23:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 20 May 2009, 18:43

31 Jul 2009, 21:32 #42

Thank you, Hillbilly Dave, for expressing yourself so well that it is helping me to calm down, right now. I needed this.
Last edited by dixieanny on 16 Aug 2009, 01:48, edited 1 time in total.
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mb
Joined: 08 Jul 2009, 18:32

11 Aug 2009, 18:23 #43

Wasn't sure where to post this but you be the judge as to whether the guy concerned is stronger or smarter (or should have visited Freedom & WhyQuit and saved himself a lot of effort).

This is from a UK daily paper and abridged by me.

"MAROONED.... SO I CAN CAST AWAY CIGARETTES

A millionaire has become a castaway on an island to try & quit smoking. Geoff Spice landed on uninhabitated Scottish island and will live there for a month. The longest he quit before is 9 days. He's got 180 cans of food and bottled water "This is my last chance. I can crack the habit" said Mr Spice of Surrey"
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

17 Aug 2009, 01:40 #44

He's certainly not much smarter than nicotine, MB
How can we meet, greet and extinguish nicotine use cue conditioning when we hide from our triggers? The smoking relapse rate for inmates upon release from prison, after having been forced to stop smoking upon arrest and imprisonment, is 97% within 6 months (see Tuthill RW et al, "Does involuntary cigarette smoking abstinence among inmates during correctional incarceration result in continued abstinence post release?" (poster). 26th National Conference on Correctional Health Care, Nashville, Tennessee, October 21, 2002).

While both our island friend and prison inmates do extinguish life's most basic use cues (living, breathing, eating, stress) what happens the first time they see their old smoking buddy, walk into the store where they used to purchase their smokes or socialize with friends or drink alcohol?

Recovery is about taking back life one slice at a time. Don't run from recovery but embrace it! There's a reward at the end of each challenge, the return of another aspect of life. Still one rule ... none today!

John (Gold 10)
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mb
Joined: 08 Jul 2009, 18:32

17 Aug 2009, 19:21 #45

Johm

Totally agree! But if he makes his next quit via FFN then he'll gain the wisdom and insights necessary. Of couse I wsh him luck in his endeavours - but it will only ever be luck whereas the NTAP route is to me about storing up the education for difficilt times.

HUGE thanks for that.
M @ 51 days quit!
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