So I Can't Run Marathons

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Dec 2006, 21:40 #31

I saw a new member noting the difference already in his endurance when walking his dogs. It made me think of this paragraph from above:
Unfortunately, many fail to consider that giving up strenuous activities today means possibly giving up essential capabilities in the future. Today, jogging may not be possible, but tomorrow, getting up stairs, walking, and eventually getting out of bed may be more than the smoker can handle.

Again from above:
Consider what activities you can do now. They may seem insignificant or unimportant. But what will life really be like when you can no longer do them. If this type of life, or more accurately, slow death does not appeal to you, then - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 May 2007, 23:31 #32

From: [url=http://content.communities.msn.com/FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow/profile?Type=MEM&Page=1&user=Joel%2E&ru=%2FFreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNow%2Fmynewlife%2Emsnw%3Faction%3Dget%5Fmessage%26mview%3D0%26ID%5FMessage%3D16702%26LastModified%3D4675316936621904083%26nopost%3D1][color=#000000]Joel.[/color][/url]
Sent: 8/9/2000 8:18 AM
Again, one of the benefits is all the things you will once again be capable of working toward. Not smoking doesn't mean you can automatically run, cycle, or do some other fun activities further or faster, just that you have the ability to train for it. As a smoker, cigarettes robbed you of that training effect to some degree and for some people, totally wiped them out or even made certain activities dangerous. Life can become fuller in many ways if you decide to pursue other options.

But be careful in the beginning. It wouldn't hurt to get checked out by your doctor, let him know you have quit and make sure everything looks OK from his or her perspective before incorporating any new major exercise activities. You have been assualting your body for many years and you just want to be careful that things are intact to train. But once you get the OK, the sky may be the limited. Odds are you will see your legs will be your limiting factor early on, before it was probably your lungs and heart that lost their steam.

Joel

[/size][/font]

 
From: Joel.Sent: 1/9/2001 7:00 AM

I saw in an earlier post of how one person is taking up running again after eight years. I thought this article would hit home with the person. It is amazing the things that people give up to sustain smoking. Basically, people give up breathing in order to sustain long term smoking even if they don't recognize that is what they are doing.

Exercise is something that is not an easy option for many people while they are smokers. Ex-smokers often have an exercise option opened up to them, but they also have an option not to exercise too. Ex-smokers may develop the ability to train to become an olympic class athlete or work real hard at becoming a total couch potato that doesn't have the interest to stay awake long enough to watch an olympic competition. It is just as an ex-smoker your body is more able to accommodate a more active and vigorous lifestyle if you choose.


But be careful of feeling you have to exercise not to smoke. Your ability to exercise is a bonus of quitting, not a tool for it. Check out the article on Crutches to Quit Smoking to further address this issue.
Last edited by Joel on 27 Jan 2010, 10:50, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Sep 2007, 06:12 #33

I thought I would attach this new string here: Too old to quit ? Too late to benefit ?
Reply

John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

23 Sep 2007, 21:15 #34

Nicotine to Fit

Bill Vilona [url=mailto:bvilona@pnj.com]bvilona@pnj.com[/url]
September, 22, 2007 - The Pensacola News Journal


Ron Heifner made a promise to his mother 25 years ago that he would give up smoking.

He took up running.

He never stopped. And he never started smoking again either.

"I still wear the same shirt size, too,'' Heifner said. "I got down to 160 pounds, and I still weigh

160 pounds.''

If that's not impressive enough, consider this feat:

When Heifner, a Pensacola resident, completes the annual

Seafood Festival 5K Run this morning in downtown Pensacola, he will surpass 50,000 road miles.

That's more tread life than the best tire on your car.

"I'm excited,'' said Heifner, 67, who works at Mike Ryan's Professional Window Tinting. "Of course, it's been awhile since I have run in one of these races. I hope I finish.''

To help celebrate, Heifner's

pastor at Cokesbury United Methodist Church will be running with him, along with Paul Epstein, owner of Running Wild on Palafox Street, who plans to run the final mile. There will be other friends, too.

The Seafood Festival 5K caught a break with the weather. Fears of a tropical storm never materialized, so race organizers opted to continue the event as planned. The race will finish in front of the Wentworth Museum on Jefferson Street. Approximately 600 runners are expected to participate in the event, organized by the Pensacola Runners Association.

Heifner has been a member of the PRA since moving to Pensacola in 2000.

"The first race I ran in Pensacola was the Seafood Festival,'' he said.

Heifner started running in 1982. His first race was the America's Finest City Half-Marathon in San Diego. Heifner still has the T-shirt, dated August. 22, 1985.

"My mother asked me to give up smoking before she died, and that's what got me motivated to start running,'' he said. "She saw it happen before she died.

"I've run in 41 marathons. The last was the Catalina Island (in California) Marathon in 2000.''

After completing a recent workout run, Heifner recorded 49,997 miles on his log. That leads right into the Seafood Festival 5K.

"I've been getting close without going over,'' he said.

That happens today.

Story source link:
Copyright © 2007 The Pensacola News Journal. All rights reserved.
Last edited by John Gold on 29 Jul 2009, 16:13, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

19 Feb 2008, 01:53 #35

A message from a non-posting member ....

Good afternoon, managers and members of Freedom!! In September 2006 my employer decided employees would not be allowed to smoke around the facilities or on the property! I was upset, how dare they impose these restrictions on my right to smoke. So I decided I would take control and quit smoking on my own before the January 2007 deadline. How ironic that I thought I was in control, when nicotine had been controlling my life for 25 years!

So October 31, 2006 at 6:00 PM I smoked my last cigarette. I had no idea what was in store for me. During my search for answers, I found WhyQuit and Freedom. Wow. I was so excited to understand what was happening to me and why. From the blood sugar changes, to the craves, to the triggers, the smoking dreams, and the light bulb moment for me, the realization that I am an addict. How simple, how true, how powerful this knowledge became to me!

I also learned that beating my smoking wife with this newly discovered wisdom would not help her see the light. We have to do it for ourselves, independent of others. So I chose to set the example, to show her and others there can be life after smoking. She still smokes, but when she is ready to quit, I will be here for her. And as I realized this was indeed a life changing journey, I decided to make other changes at the same time. Simple changes, like eating smaller, healthier meals during the day, and why not exercise a little too? They all go together, like a chain around a sprocket. Healthier eating, exercise, no smoking, all are lifestyle changes.

I feel a connection to all members who post on the boards, even though we have never met. I thank you all for sharing your struggles, victories, feelings and thoughts. You have been a light on my journey, a rope I can hold on to, and the wind that pushes my sails. I am so proud of you all, and I am proud of myself. This has been the hardest thing I have ever done, but it is the most rewarding.

Within a few weeks of my anniversary, I completed my first ½ marathon. Two weeks ago I completed my 1st marathon in Miami. I am confident to say this would not be possible without you all sharing your experiences, and allowing me to visit, read, secure and protect my quit. From 2 packs a day for 25 years, to running 26.2 miles, anything is possible when you find Freedom!! And it keeps getting better, I can't wait to see what's next! To once again borrow a priceless phrase, It's simple but not always easy: Never Take Another Puff.

Thanks,

Jeff

Free and Healing for One Year, Three Months, Eight Days, 20 Hours and 59 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 40 Days and 10 Hours, by avoiding the use of 11647 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,187.27.


Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Jun 2008, 05:16 #36

From above:

Again, one of the benefits is all the things you will once again be capable of working toward. Not smoking doesn't mean you can automatically run, cycle, or do some other fun activities further or faster, just that you have the ability to train for it. As a smoker, cigarettes robbed you of that training effect to some degree and for some people, totally wiped them out or even made certain activities dangerous. Life can become fuller in many ways if you decide to pursue other options.

But be careful in the beginning. It wouldn't hurt to get checked out by your doctor, let him know you have quit and make sure everything looks OK from his or her perspective before incorporating any new major exercise activities. You have been assualting your body for many years and you just want to be careful that things are intact to train. But once you get the OK, the sky may be the limited. Odds are you will see your legs will be your limiting factor early on, before it was probably your lungs and heart that lost their steam.

Joel

and

I saw in an earlier post of how one person is taking up running again after eight years. I thought this article would hit home with the person. It is amazing the things that people give up to sustain smoking. Basically, people give up breathing in order to sustain long term smoking even if they don't recognize that is what they are doing.

Exercise is something that is not an easy option for many people while they are smokers. Ex-smokers often have an exercise option opened up to them, but they also have an option not to exercise too. Ex-smokers may develop the ability to train to become an olympic class athlete or work real hard at becoming a total couch potato that doesn't have the interest to stay awake long enough to watch an olympic competition. It is just as an ex-smoker your body is more able to accommodate a more active and vigorous lifestyle if you choose.

But be careful of feeling you have to exercise not to smoke. Your ability to exercise is a bonus of quitting, not a tool for it. Check out the article on Crutches to Quit Smoking to further address this issue.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Aug 2008, 19:53 #37

Your ability to exercise should be seen as a bonus for you having quit smoking not a mandatory tool for being able to quit. There may be times in a person's life where because of physical problems or time constraints exercise is not possible. Even in such times people can sustain their quits. See the post crutches to quit smoking which discusses this issue in detail.
Reply

FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

10 Dec 2008, 19:43 #38

Joel's Reinforcement Library
Image

So I Can't Run Marathons





"So I can't run marathons - big deal, I never wanted to anyway." Many times I encounter a smoker who claims that his smoking isn't a real problem in his life. Sure, he can't do vigorous activities, but generally he is able to meet life's essential demands.

Unfortunately, many fail to consider that giving up strenuous activities today means possibly giving up essential capabilities in the future. Today, jogging may not be possible, but tomorrow, getting up stairs, walking, and eventually getting out of bed may be more than the smoker can handle.

Hundreds of thousands of smokers become permanently crippled every year by diseases like emphysema. Typically, the smoker was warned by his physician to quit smoking before the disease caused minor impairments. But even when this threat became a reality, the smoker failed to quit.

However, once a breathing impairment becomes evident, every day of smoking makes it progressively worse. It will get to the point where normal breathing becomes painful, then impossible. Day by day he must give up yet another essential activity.

Soon he becomes totally dependent on his family to carry on his responsibilities. Not only can't he shovel snow, he can't leave the house if the temperature drops below freezing. He can't help prepare dinner, he hardly has the strength to chew it. And then one day breathing becomes impossible. His entire world becomes an oxygen tent, and death becomes his only way out. At this point, death is not an unwelcome alternative.

The dying patient may think back to when he made the comment "So I can't jog. Big deal." If he only knew then what he knows now, he would not have treated the subject so lightly. Unfortunately for him, it is too late to repair the damage.

You may feel that you have smoked so long that it is too late to quit now. But the odds are, you are not at this tragic point yet. If you quit, your odds of ever becoming this impaired are dramatically reduced. If you continue to smoke, well then every day this nightmarish existence becomes a closer possibility.

Consider what activities you can do now. They may seem insignificant or unimportant. But what will life really be like when you can no longer do them. If this type of life, or more accurately, slow death does not appeal to you, then - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
© Joel Spitzer 1986, 2000
Page last updated by Joel Spitzer on August 25, 2003

Related videos:
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 23 Dec 2013, 14:44, edited 5 times in total.
Reply

FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

29 Jul 2009, 15:58 #39

From: Gene Short
Email Received: 07/21/09



First I must apologize if this post is too long. After 15.5 years of lying, cheating, stealing, begging, and digging through gutters and public ashtrays for any salvagable nicotine, I took my final hit of nicotine on July 21, 2008 at 9:24PM.

I had tried quitting before - cold turkey then deciding to be social smoker a week later in 2001; the patch in 2002, which lasted about 2 months (smoked through the first four weeks of the patch) until I decided to see if I'd still enjoy just one. Then about a half a dozen or so weak attempts from 2004 onward that never got me past three days.

I armed myself with the best excuses I could - I watched too many Guns N' Roses videos as a kid so I was tainted and could never change. It helps me think, I need some vice. Or my favorite - I lost 106 pounds in 2000/2001 so I'm excused from making any more healthy choices for the next ten years.

My 10 cigarette a day "habit" in high school was now a 30 cigarette a day deadly addiction at age 29. I smoked fast so I had 2 cigarettes at each sitting every hour. I puffed hard, held it in long, and loved the feeling of my throat burning. I was starting to pick up a wheeze that I'd try to hide from my wife, the never-smoker who'd occassionally give me a "you need to quit that" line. But she didn't know how I needed it to survive. All she knew about smoking is that it killed her grandfather shortly before we met. Anyway, my wheeze was getting worse and worse and obviously I never planned on smoking forever so I figured I might as well try to stop now.

Something told me on 7/21/08 that this was a good time to quit nicotine. My wife was now pregnant with our second, I had just gotten my masters which took away my "I need it to think" excuse, and there was that wheeze. So the plan was that I'd finish my current supply that day and wake up on 7/22/08 with a few hours already behind me. That's what I did. I don't know I ever made it past that first day, but one day turned into two, and halfway through the third day I was having a really tough time. I googled "Quitting smoking" and clicked a few links and suddenly was staring at this emaciated figure lying in a bed, mouth wide open, with a woman and child next to him. I'd met a man who would change my life forever that day. I met Bryan Lee Curtis.

There it was, this is what I needed to see. My struggles of "I want one" and waiting around for my usual relapsed suddenly vanished. Here I was five years younger than he was at his death and my comfort that I'm too young for lung cancer was taken from me. I was now never the same. I could never play dumb again and actually believe my defenses. I decided within five minutes of reading "He wanted you to know" that I would never relapse to chronic nicotine use ever again.

I came back to Whyquit.com many times over the next two weeks to read Bryan's story over and over. I also found Noni's, Kim's, and Deb's stories and realized that Bryan wasn't a one-time freak nicotine accident. This was a fate that I had a 50% chance of experiencing unless I got myself under control. I soon began to explore other parts of Whyquit.com and once I truly understood why I smoked and the concept of the Law of Addiction, the struggle became easier. I could now acknowledge that yes, I do want one hit of nicotine, but I understand that addiction doesn't work that way. I can have no nicotine or be back to my old level, but nothing in between. Once I truly believed that, I started to develop a real peaceful feeling about it.

By my one month anniversary, I'd tell anyone who would listen about how great my new life is. I still had plenty of tough times, but by the third month I believe I had my last positive thought about smoking and nicotine use. Somewhere around that time, my wife and I were driving in the rain and I caught of whiff of some amazing smell. I said to her "What is that smell?!?" She looked at me inquisitively, as I pressed my face against the A/C vent in the car. "Nope that's not it", then I rolled down the window and WOW..there that smell was. I looked at her in a "HA! I GOT YOU" kind of look and said "There, that's it. Don't you smell that?" She said very casually "I smell rain". I said "Wait..rain has a smell?!?". "Duh...yes" was her reply. I spent the next week asking anyone I saw if they knew rain had a smell...they all answered similar to her "Duh" answer.


I think I've read every word on Whyquit.com dozens of times; I've read Joel's book cover to cover enough to have most of it memorized. I've downloaded, printed, and bound about 5 copies of "Never take another puff" and given them to various people whom I think may be interested. I know that two people quit after reading it - one on my five month anniversary, the other on my eleventh - I'm not sure if it was directly because of it, but I'd like to think that if all users read the book and understood why they used nicotine that there would certainly be less smokers, dippers, and chewers in the world.

ImageAround the sixth month, I decided to do something to show myself how different life is. I began training to run a 5K. I ran the 5K on the day that I would have had my 10,000 mandatory nicotine feeding if not for finding Whyquit.com. Around kilometer 4, my legs were hurting and breathing was getting hard. How did I get myself through it? Apparently I have Joel's article "So I can't run Marathons" memorized and started repeating to myself. I thought about how Bryan would have loved a second chance to quit and do what I'm doing right at that second. I placed 103rd out of 110 runners, but I knew that I had come a million kilometers from where I had been. I'm no athlete; just an addict.

So now at a full year later I'm writing to thank you for all of the hours spent on maintaining the site and thanking Joel for all of the wonderful and right-on articles about addiction. For all of you contemplating a quit, it's worth it, it's hard for a couple weeks, but it does get better. All you need to do is to never take another puff. For all of you new quitters, my advice is to stay with the site and read anything that you can. Always remember the law of addiction. And before you decide to slip, read the "Smokers Vow" to yourself. While my 366th day may be easier than your 1st, we're both one puff away from full relapse. It's true what they say though, life really does go on. I've survived a stock market crash, bad weather, bad traffic, and the birth of a child, and I didn't need to ingest new nicotine to celebrate or survive through them. The best advice that you could ever receive is just as Joel's articles say - Never Take Another Puff.

Gene Short
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 29 Jul 2009, 16:14, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

27 Jan 2010, 10:42 #40

Kicking smoking empowers man to take on mountain Zack Ralphs: Scaling Mount KilimanjaroWednesday, January 13, 2010 -  Salt LakeCityWeekley.Net

By Jason Franchuk
Image

There will be times during an 80-mile mountain climb that Zack Ralphs will have to worry not just about himself, but also about the woman he is helping to carry up to the highest point in Africa. It turns out, however, this is not nearly as hazardous to his health as smoking a pack a day for about 15 years.

Ralphs is headed to Mount Kilimanjaro this month, as part of a charity project in which Utah-based company Overstock.com is sending an employee to assist a disabled climber. Which brings up two pretty basic questions: Why on earth, and how?

Ralphs turned 29 in July 2009, and four months earlier, quit a smoking habit that dated back to junior high school. During a physical, a doctor told him he had the body of someone twice his age—except his blood pressure wouldn’t last even that long. He hooked a couple of interview panels for the Corrective Holistic Exercise Kinesiology (CHEK) Institute’s “Fit 4 Kili Climb Project” with his nicotine-huffing lifestyle, convincing doctors that his 215pound frame—which had already shed 18 pounds—could drop another 30. Out of 240 entries, the 5-foot-9 Ralphs is the guy who has gotten to do the rigorous training for a rare opportunity.

Ralphs has since dropped below 200 pounds, and is in the final stages of hardcore training. His workouts were derailed some over Labor Day weekend, when he crashed a dirt bike in Moab and needed eight stitches. He says training is intense almost every day of the week, as CHEK hooked him up with myriad ways to prepare, from nutrition to training. He has been doing yoga as well, promoting a different type of inhaling and exhaling than the kind he grew up with.

CHEK’s project is a cross-promotion of companies and organizations that try to advance awareness of disabled athletes. Ralphs will be joined by California resident Erica Davis, who is a paraplegic, and Tara Butcher. Butcher, who lost a leg below the knee after a car accident four years ago, grew up in Salt Lake City and went to high school with Ralphs. Davis—who will be fit with a customized wheelchair that will allow her to do most of her own work—will be the first paraplegic woman to summit “Kili.”

It will be the last haul which will be the hardest on the group. Ralphs and six others, in lung-squeezing elevations, will take turns carrying Davis and her wheelchair with two long poles. They’ll go as long as they can, then rest. That part of the journey is expected to take 14 hours—about four hours longer than just climbing without such a challenge.

“It’s going to be an amazing experience for all of us,” Ralphs says. “I think all of us will benefit by being a part of it. A big factor could be the altitude. We’ll get to 18,000 feet. I think I have some advantage because I’m used to training in altitude, but then you hear stories of people who get really sick but just have to keep on moving.

“But it’s such a cool group. I think we’ll be laughing the whole way up. That’s when we’ll really feel the lack of oxygen.”

It’ll be a 15,000-foot hike in elevation from the base to the highest peak in Africa. Ralphs said he’s been told that at the top, one can see the earth’s curvature. He’ll be on Facebook and Twitter, documenting his extraordinary accomplishment (keyword: Zackamanjaro), including reaching the summit Feb. 1. An accompanying film crew will be producing a documentary called “Through the Roof.”

Ralphs has been training several days a week in Park City, while also watching his caloric intake at home. He cut out fast food, energy drinks and most of what used to make up his diet, and is constantly monitored so trainers can have him in peak condition when the hike arrives. In San Diego for some last-minute instruction, the former Boy Scout prepared himself for a different kind of honor—not a bad badge to earn by a guy who estimates he had gone 12 years without working out.
 
Story Source Link
© Copyright 2010 Copperfield Publishing  

Thanks Leo for bringing this story to our attention!
Reply