So I Can't Run Marathons

John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

14 Dec 2004, 10:14 #21

From: ImageImageLordlyCrayon (Original Message) Sent: 12/13/2004 4:55 PM
It's true. Yesterday I finished my first marathon in 5 hours and fifteen minutes. I was a pack a day smoker for five years and quit exactly one year and ten months ago.

You could not pay me enough to take even one puff of one cigarette today. The sense of accomplishment I felt as I crossed the finish line was huge. My thoughts were many as I ran the last few miles, but very prevalent in my mind was how lucky I am that I stumbled on this website all those months ago, desperately trying to quit in order to save money.

Did you know I could hardly sleep some nights as a smoker because I had such a hard time breathing? I wanted to be an athlete but every time I would try to run I had to stop to catch my breath. I could never run more than two miles at a time as a smoker.

I breath easy, now. Hold on to those quits, people. The dividends it pays are huge.


Oh yeah, I'm Alex, also known as justme, and I have been nicotine free for 1 year and ten months
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GoldenDivamom1972
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 May 2005, 22:51 #22

It's interesting that this comes up today.

See, yesterday I did my first 5K. Today, I'm hurting, but triumphant. There's no way I would have even tried to do this as an active nicotine addict.

I ran most of it, did my first mile in under 10 minutes. I finished the thing in 39 minutes and change. And guess what, I didn't even come in last in my age group! Go me!!

There are more running events going on in my area this summer, some of which my company will pay the entry fee. I'm kind of excited now. It makes me want to really get out there and run instead of walk! Maybe not today though...today is *definitely* a rest day.

Blessings, and cool runnings,
Amy--Bronze!!
118 days
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CarolJJ3
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:04

02 May 2005, 00:01 #23

Oh, Amy! I'm so proud of ya! Go YOU! ...for sure.

You've inspired me! Everybody on Freedom has inspired me. I won't be running marathons any time soom (I'm sixty, smoked for 47 years, have been quit for 19 days and 15 hours), but as soon as I catch this pooch I'm gonna take her for a slow stroll around the block. Baby steps, right? The dog is hiding from me cuz when she sees me with the lead she thinks "VET".

Carol
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GoldenDivamom1972
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Jun 2005, 01:23 #24

Can't help but use this thread to brag just a little bit.

I took up running about six weeks ago, just after a local 5K run. I finished, but boy, was I hurting afterward!

Well, just like with nicotine cessation, progress comes with practice. Yesterday I went to a local state park and ran on that trail. I totalled 10 miles, 8 of it running. That's the furthest I have run in I-don't-know-when. The only reason I didn't run the last two miles was because my legs quit. My lungs were perfectly capable of continuing, but the legs just weren't up to the task...*this* time.

Now, as I prepare for my next 5K event, I feel even more blessed that I took the NTAP challenge. Every day I NTAP means another chance to break personal records.

Blessings,
Amy--Bronze+Double Green
155 days
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mslindy6
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jun 2005, 00:48 #25

Amy
Brag away, I know how great it feels to do something you never thought possible
You did an awesome thing! Congratulations girl! That is so great.

I too am bragging away to all my friends about my trek to Yosemite - I even out trekked some never smokers - I wrote the details in my diary link here The first post - finally message #51

I feel that what ever the accomplisment - conquering a flight of stairs, getting out of a lazy boy chair and walking to the kitchen or running the 5k or trekking 12 miles it is all good and all part of us getting free from nicotine forever - the more accomplishments we can see that are directly smoking related the more we can see the value of NTAP and when and if a trigger comes we can shoot it down with so much ammunition!

I have been quit for 3 Months, 6 Days, 10 hours and 46 minutes (98 days). I have saved $787.58 by not smoking 1,968 cigarettes. I have saved 6 Days and 20 hours of my life.
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GoldenDivamom1972
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Jun 2005, 12:32 #26

...YET. I can't run them YET.

Now that I've deactivated my nicotine addiction, I've completed yet another 5K. I cut about 3 minutes off my previous time, ran the whole thing, and finished it feeling like I could do it again. Which I will. Image

There's no WAY I would have even tried to do this while I was still smoking. I'm loving it now, though. It's definitely NOT a crutch, but I wouldn't be able to run long distances and run faster if I still smoked.

Running madly towards silver,
Amy
166 days of freedom
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Starshinegrl Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Jun 2005, 15:06 #27

Wow, Amy, I still don't like running BUT you will certainly run a marathon one day! Image


Gitte
205 days and a bit
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jun 2005, 19:03 #28

From: Joel. Sent: 8/9/2000 8:18 AM
Again, one of the benefits is all the things you will once again be capable of working toward. Not smoking doesn't mean you can automatically run, cycle, or do some other fun activities further or faster, just that you have the ability to train for it. As a smoker, cigarettes robbed you of that training effect to some degree and for some people, totally wiped them out or even made certain activities dangerous. Life can become fuller in many ways if you decide to pursue other options.

But be careful in the beginning. It wouldn't hurt to get checked out by your doctor, let him know you have quit and make sure everything looks OK from his or her perspective before incorporating any new major exercise activities. You have been assualting your body for many years and you just want to be careful that things are intact to train. But once you get the OK, the sky may be the limited. Odds are you will see your legs will be your limiting factor early on, before it was probably your lungs and heart that lost their steam.

Joel
From: Joel. Sent: 1/9/2001 7:00 AM
I saw in an earlier post of how one person is taking up running again after eight years. I thought this article would hit home with the person. It is amazing the things that people give up to sustain smoking. Basically, people give up breathing in order to sustain long term smoking even if they don't recognize that is what they are doing.

Exercise is something that is not an easy option for many people while they are smokers. Ex-smokers often have an exercise option opened up to them, but they also have an option not to exercise too. Ex-smokers may develop the ability to train to become an olympic class athlete or work real hard at becoming a total couch potato that doesn't have the interest to stay awake long enough to watch an olympic competition. It is just as an ex-smoker your body is more able to accommodate a more active and vigorous lifestyle if you choose.

But be careful of feeling you have to exercise not to smoke. Your ability to exercise is a bonus of quitting, not a tool for it. Check out the article on Crutches to Quit Smoking to further address this issue.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Aug 2005, 01:43 #29

From: Joel. Sent: 8/9/2000 8:18 AM
Again, one of the benefits is all the things you will once again be capable of working toward. Not smoking doesn't mean you can automatically run, cycle, or do some other fun activities further or faster, just that you have the ability to train for it. As a smoker, cigarettes robbed you of that training effect to some degree and for some people, totally wiped them out or even made certain activities dangerous. Life can become fuller in many ways if you decide to pursue other options.

But be careful in the beginning. It wouldn't hurt to get checked out by your doctor, let him know you have quit and make sure everything looks OK from his or her perspective before incorporating any new major exercise activities. You have been assualting your body for many years and you just want to be careful that things are intact to train. But once you get the OK, the sky may be the limited. Odds are you will see your legs will be your limiting factor early on, before it was probably your lungs and heart that lost their steam.

Joel
From: Joel. Sent: 1/9/2001 7:00 AM
I saw in an earlier post of how one person is taking up running again after eight years. I thought this article would hit home with the person. It is amazing the things that people give up to sustain smoking. Basically, people give up breathing in order to sustain long term smoking even if they don't recognize that is what they are doing.

Exercise is something that is not an easy option for many people while they are smokers. Ex-smokers often have an exercise option opened up to them, but they also have an option not to exercise too. Ex-smokers may develop the ability to train to become an olympic class athlete or work real hard at becoming a total couch potato that doesn't have the interest to stay awake long enough to watch an olympic competition. It is just as an ex-smoker your body is more able to accommodate a more active and vigorous lifestyle if you choose.

But be careful of feeling you have to exercise not to smoke. Your ability to exercise is a bonus of quitting, not a tool for it. Check out the article on Crutches to Quit Smoking to further address this issue.
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GoldenDivamom1972
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

30 Apr 2006, 01:55 #30

...but I *can* run half a marathon!

About a year ago, I did my first 5K, almost 4 months after I quit smoking. I ran, walked, and staggered my way through it.

Today I ran 13.1 miles. As I got to the section that meets up with the 5K course, I marvelled at the fact that it was just so much easier this year. I ran the last 5K of the half faster than I ran the 5K last year. Pretty sweet.

No, not everyone will want to take up running after quitting, and it's still definitely *not* a crutch. Quitting just made it a heck of a lot easier. It's kind of hard to run when you can't breath properly. I can't imagine running these kinds of distances as a smoker. There's just no way.

Blessings,
Amy--Gold N' Bronze
481 days running Image
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