So how did most successful ex-smokers actually quit?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jan 2008, 22:24 #31

For Christina:
Take Your Own Survey
So how do most people really quit smoking? Don't take our word for it, or the American Cancer Society's, but instead talk to every long-term ex-smoker you personally know. See how many of them fall into one of the following three categories:
1. People who woke up one day and were suddenly sick and tired of smoking. They tossed them that day and never looked back;
2. People who get sick. Not smoking sick, meaning some kind of catastrophic smoking induced illness. Just people who get a cold or a flu and feel miserable. The feel too sick to smoke, they may feel too sick to eat. They are down with the infection for two or three days, start to get better and then realize that they have a few days down without smoking and decide to try to keep it going. Again, they never look back and stuck with their new commitment; or
3. People who leave a doctors office given an ultimatum. Quit smoking or drop dead--it's your choice. These are people who some sort of problem has been identified by their doctors who lays out in no uncertain terms that the person's life is at risk now if they do not quit smoking.
All of these stories share one thing in common--the technique that people use to quit. They simply quit smoking one day. The reasons they quit varied but the technique used was basically the same. For the most part they are clear examples of spur of the moment decisions elicited by some external, and sometimes unknown circumstance.
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I really do encourage all people to take their own survey, talking to long-term ex-smokers in their real world: people who you knew when they were smokers, who you knew when they were quitting and who you still know as being successful long-term ex-smokers. The more people you talk to the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must Never Take Another Puff!
[center] [center] [center] Joel
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ccathy247
Joined: 21 Apr 2009, 02:43

13 Jun 2009, 04:00 #32

<br>
Image
The intelligent quitter's strategy combines an understanding of the Law of Addiction
with well-protected core motivations.

Nobody ever graduates from Addiction

Cathy, Gold

[Quit April 10, 2009]
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elmagno
Joined: 01 Jun 2009, 20:50

13 Jun 2009, 11:52 #33

Here's a working link to: Cancer Prevention & Early Detection Facts & Figures 2007-08http://cancer.org/downloads/STT/CPED_2008.pdf

This is the latest and most relevant American Cancer Society publication I can locate. Pages 12 & 13 have some details about tobacco cessation, but I could not find any chart or numeric analysis about successful methodology for quiting. I, too, would be interested to know how more recent figures compare to the 2003 chart supplied by Joel. Congratulations on your quit and NTAP!


Management Rules Note:  In the future please have all external links approved by a manager.  This ACS link is acceptable.  Freedom's Staff
Last edited by elmagno on 16 Feb 2010, 05:12, edited 2 times in total.
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JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

16 Feb 2010, 05:34 #34

Excellent question.  The most recent finding is from Professor Simon Chapman in his just released paper entitled:  The Global Research Neglect of Unassisted Smoking Cessation: Causes and Consequences.  In it he asserts that after examining 2008 papers that up to 75% of all successful ex-smokers quit entirely on their own.  His paper actually references the earlier ACS figure.  While I have not yet had a chance to review his sources, I think that if worldwide data is examined, which would include poorer nations where quitting product marketing is all but non-existent, that the planet's global on-you-own quitting rates may be significantly higher.

As Professor Simon's paper points out, in developed nations smokers have been bombarded since 1984 by qutting product ads, with many ads undermining confidence in the quitter's natural recovery instincts.  But who besides forums such as ours would celebrate the fact that this year more successful ex-uers will quit cold turkey than all other quitting methods combined?   I'm afraid that after nearly three decades it's getting to the point where millions brainwashed into believing that quitting without pharm product use is nearly impossible -- who may have previously used them  yet failed -- feel they that they have no other real choice.   Faced with decades of harm and the prospect of quitting or being killed by their addiction, it makes you wonder, are they quitting because of these products or in spite of them?

Still just one rule that if followed provides a 100% guarantee to all ... no nicotine today!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x10)
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FreedomStaff
Joined: 30 Aug 2011, 12:44

14 Jan 2012, 18:07 #35

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]So how do most people really quit smoking? Don't take our word for it--go talk to every long-term ex-smoker you personally know. See how many of them fall into one of the following three categories:[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
  1. People who woke up one day and were suddenly sick and tired of smoking. They tossed them that day and never looked back.
  2. People who get sick. Not smoking sick, meaning some kind of catastrophic smoking induced illness. Just people who get a cold or a flu and feel miserable. The feel too sick to smoke, they may feel too sick to eat. They are down with the infection for two or three days, start to get better and then realize that they have a few days down without smoking and decide to try to keep it going. Again, they never look back and stuck with their new commitment.
  3. People who leave a doctors office given an ultimatum. Quit smoking or drop dead--it's your choice. These are people who some sort of problem has been identified by their doctors who lays out in no uncertain terms that the person's life is at risk now if they do not quit smoking.
All of these stories share one thing in common--the technique that people use to quit. They simply quit smoking one day. The reason they quit had varied but the technique they used was basically the same. For the most part they are clear examples of spur of the moment decisions elicited by some external and sometimes, some unknown circumstance.

I really do encourage all people to take this survey, talking to long-term ex-smokers in their real world. People who you knew when they were smokers, who you knew when they were quitting and who you still know as being successful long-term ex-smokers. The more people you talk to the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must never take another puff!

Joel

[/font]
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