Smoking Triggers

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

05 Jan 2008, 08:59 #61

From  Restoring volume control :
So what do you do, if you are addicted to smoking cigarettes and you want to stop? When use of an addictive drug like nicotine is stopped, the level of signaling along the many affected pathways will change to levels far from normal.

If the drug is not reintroduced, the altered level of signalling will eventually induce the nerve cells to once again make compensatory changes that restore an appropriate balance of activities within the brain.

Over time, receptor numbers, their sensitivity, and patterns of release of neurotransmitters all revert to normal, once again producing normal levels of signalling along the pathways.

There is no way to avoid the down side. The pleasure pathways will not function at normal levels until the number of receptors on the affected nerve cells have time to readjust.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 18 Jan 2012, 18:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

06 Aug 2008, 08:21 #62

Your brain is healing! Stay smart and let yourself continue to heal through each trigger experienced. The truth is that you will become experienced at living life comfortably without your drug controlling you. Let time and triggers come and go. It is so worth it. Image

ImageSal
Five years, six months, three weeks, three days, 18 hours, 20 minutes and 26 seconds. 48786 cigarettes not smoked, saving $9,757.07. Life saved: 24 weeks, 1 day, 9 hours, 30 minutes.
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JohnForLife
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:41

27 Sep 2008, 19:44 #63

Obviously, I'm in no position to disagree with someone of Joel's background on a subject like the cause of cravings (!), but when I read this, I wanted to offer up an alternative theory for why this woman encountered a craving in the ice cream isle.

My thought is that ice cream, particularly chocolate ice cream, causes truckloads of endorphins to be released into the system. Many of us have a strong desire to eat ice cream as we walk down the ice cream isle - a result of marketing and the body's own recollection of the endorphin releases from burying a spoonful of chocolatey goodness into one's mouth.

I would suggest, Joel, that it is possible that your friend wanted to buy and eat ice cream, and that the nicotine craving that she had may have been triggered by this having been her first time addressing the fact that she a) wanted an ice cream endorphin boost, b) couldn't have it until she purchased the ice cream and got it home, and therefore c) had the urge to tie herself over with nicotine until she could get to the ice cream.

As to the increased duration of the craving, I would suggest that it is possible that seeing the ice cream, wanting the ice cream, denying herself the ice cream and not being able to smoke her way through it in the store could cause one craving, and that leaving the store (a common trigger on its own) after having suffered through an ordeal inside the store (less common) may have triggered a second craving, as smoking after an ordeal is pretty habitual.

This is an alternate suggestion - might well be wrong :)

John

P.S. I'm hitting five months without nicotine this weekend thanks to this site, this community, Joel's commitment to helping people and my understanding (finally) that the way to beat this addiction is to know that at any given point in time, I may be called upon without warning to go five minutes without allowing nicotine to enter my body. Never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Sep 2008, 06:07 #64

Whether the trigger was a response to wanting ice cream or a response to just not having smoked for the time period in which she was shopping is not really that important. What was important was that a thought for a cigarette was now triggered by some affiliation with the isle. By not taking the cigarette, the person started the process of breaking the specific trigger, whatever it may have been. The next time she faced the same situation the response would probably have been less pronounced and after a few times getting through the isle it probably no longer resulted in any smoking thought.

As it says above:

Sometimes the triggers don't make so much sense, at least on the surface. The trick is just to always have your guard up, being prepared daily for anything. For no matter how long you are off smoking, triggers can and will occur.
Sometimes triggers will be obvious and easy to identify, like running into an old friend who is a chain smoker and you always smoked with them in the past. Sometimes they will be less obvious though, like when it is an old friend who has always been a non-smoker. Whenever you were with them in the past, you too would never smoke because they were around. So why would they make you think of a cigarette?

Well, before you would ever go to see them, you would smoke a few extra cigarettes just to be able to stay with them a little longer. Or more likely, the trigger wouldn't happen when you first see them, but rather as soon as they would leave. More accurately, it would hit as soon as you were out of their line of vision. In the past, that is when you would instantly light up. Even though you never smoked in their presence, you were still a smoker when with them. This association will last until these initial first encounters with them breaking the pattern and mindset that you are a smoker in this particular circumstance.

As more and more time passes, experiences like this become more sporadic. But keep focused daily. When you wake up say today is another day you will not smoke. So if these rare occurrences happen, you are ready. And again at the end of the day congratulate yourself for another victorious day without smoking.

Hang in there and don't let the triggers get you. Make each one just another learning experience. The lesson, no matter what triggers a thought, to beat it, Never Take Another Puff!
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

31 Oct 2008, 06:24 #65

From  Restoring volume control :
So what do you do, if you are addicted to smoking cigarettes and you want to stop? When use of an addictive drug like nicotine is stopped, the level of signaling along the many affected pathways will change to levels far from normal.

If the drug is not reintroduced, the altered level of signalling will eventually induce the nerve cells to once again make compensatory changes that restore an appropriate balance of activities within the brain.

Over time, receptor numbers, their sensitivity, and patterns of release of neurotransmitters all revert to normal, once again producing normal levels of signalling along the pathways.

There is no way to avoid the down side. The pleasure pathways will not function at normal levels until the number of receptors on the affected nerve cells have time to readjust.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 18 Jan 2012, 18:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

13 Oct 2011, 20:32 #66

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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

09 Aug 2012, 17:17 #67

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