Smoking Triggers

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jun 2003, 22:31 #41

Time distortion is a normal early recovery symptom.
Subconscious crave episodes are less than three minutes.
Be sure and look at a clock as the minutes can seem like hours!
Image
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Lyverbyrd
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Jul 2003, 06:34 #42

My first visit to the pub this evening since I quit. This is the first time in 10 years I've been out for a drink and not had a cigarette, and furthermore not even wanted one. Kewl.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Dec 2003, 22:30 #43

Image The holiday season can likely pose many new triggers unique to this time of year. The way to break all of these triggers is to simply keep reminding yourself that the only way to stay successfully smoke free no matter how often you may experience these passing thoughts regarding cigarettes is to stick to the commitment that you made to yourself to never take another puff! Joel
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kattatonic1 gold4
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jan 2004, 13:00 #44

Oh boy is this the truth. Just yesterday I realized I was having a craving whenever I finished doing something, almost anything. I never thought about my smoking in those terms. Finish something, smoke. Finish something, smoke. And I used to start thinking about it just before I finished. The ice cream is a great example. Thanks again for your wisdom, Joel!

Kay
Eighteen Days, 18 Hours and 30 Minutes of Freedom.
Abstaining from 375 cigarettes has saved me $120.23,
and extended my life expectancy by 1 Day and 7 Hours.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Aug 2004, 03:50 #45

From: Joel Sent: 12/17/2003 8:17 AM
Sometimes the triggers don't make so much sense, at least on the surface. The trick is just to always have your guard up, being prepared daily for anything. For no matter how long you are off smoking, triggers can and will occur. Sometimes triggers will be obvious and easy to identify, like running into an old friend who is a chain smoker and you always smoked with them in the past. Sometimes they will be less obvious though, like when it is an old friend who has always been a non-smoker. Whenever you were with them in the past, you too would never smoke because they were around. So why would they make you think of a cigarette?

Well, before you would ever go to see them, you would smoke a few extra cigarettes just to be able to stay with them a little longer. Or more likely, the trigger wouldn't happen when you first see them, but rather as soon as they would leave. More accurately, it would hit as soon as you were out of their line of vision. In the past, that is when you would instantly light up. Even though you never smoked in their presence, you were still a smoker when with them. This association will last until these initial first encounters with them breaking the pattern and mindset that you are a smoker in this particular circumstance.

As more and more time passes, experiences like this become more sporadic. But keep focused daily. When you wake up say today is another day you will not smoke. So if these rare occurrences happen, you are ready. And again at the end of the day congratulate yourself for another victorious day without smoking.

Hang in there and don't let the triggers get you. Make each one just another learning experience. The lesson, no matter what triggers a thought, to beat it, Never Take Another Puff!

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SueB911
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:06

15 Sep 2004, 06:36 #46

Joel, your insights continue to amaze me. I'm so glad I find these links everywhere I go on this site. Unfortunately, I can't figure out how to add them to my posts. I know - the instructions were up yesterday. I'll figure it out eventually!!! In the mean time, thanks to everyone for the support.

Sue
I have been quit for 3 Weeks, 1 Day, 16 hours, 5 minutes and 39 seconds (22 days). I have saved $68.00 by not smoking 453 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 13 hours and 45 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 8/23/2004
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Nov 2004, 02:28 #47

I see we have a few people who are just over the first three days now so I thought I would bring up a few posts about the thoughts for cigarettes still happening and contrast them with the demands your body was creating the first few days for nicotine, or true urges. They are different and you will find that if focused on now, the desires can be squelched. Good posts to read on the topic are:

Thoughts that seem worse than the first days urges
You said it would get better but it's just as bad!
Just think about something else?

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 18 Jan 2012, 18:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Nov 2004, 19:37 #48

The day after Thanksgiving is traditionally the day when the Christmas season is kicked into high gear. In many countries, even people who don't celebrate Christmas will still encounter new trigger situations surrounding the holiday. The sounds of Christmas music will permeate the stores where you shop, and Christmas decorations will begin popping up in homes and businesses. All of these sounds and sites will be new first time triggers for any person who has quit smoking any time in the past ten months. Being aware of the potential of these triggers will likely make you more prepared to get through them with minimal effort. Not all triggers though are as easy to warn people of or to prepare for.

Sometimes the triggers don't make so much sense, at least on the surface. The trick is just to always have your guard up, being prepared daily for anything. For no matter how long you are off smoking, triggers can and will occur. Sometimes triggers will be obvious and easy to identify, like running into an old friend who is a chain smoker and you always smoked with them in the past. Sometimes they will be less obvious though, like when it is an old friend who has always been a non-smoker. Whenever you were with them in the past, you too would never smoke because they were around. So why would they make you think of a cigarette?

Well, before you would ever go to see them, you would smoke a few extra cigarettes just to be able to stay with them a little longer. Or more likely, the trigger wouldn't happen when you first see them, but rather as soon as they would leave. More accurately, it would hit as soon as you were out of their line of vision. In the past, that is when you would instantly light up. Even though you never smoked in their presence, you were still a smoker when with them. This association will last until these initial first encounters with them breaking the pattern and mindset that you are a smoker in this particular circumstance.

As more and more time passes, experiences like this become more sporadic. But keep focused daily. When you wake up say today is another day you will not smoke. So if these rare occurrences happen, you are ready. And again at the end of the day congratulate yourself for another victorious day without smoking.

Hang in there and don't let the triggers get you. Make each one just another learning experience. The lesson, no matter what triggers a thought, to successfully overcome it is as simple as sticking to your personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff!
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GoldenDivamom1972
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Jan 2005, 08:22 #49

*ding, ding* Well, this one hits home! I was doing serious housecleaning today, the first time I've done *serious* housecleaning since I quit. Just after I finished vacuuming, I had a teeny-weeny urge to sit down and light up before I moved on. Yep, it takes me about 20-30 minutes to vacuum my house, lol.

Amy
Free and Healing for Twenty Days, 12 Hours and 57 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 2 Days and 3 Hours, by avoiding the use of 616 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $154.18.
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coryw42
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:12

05 Feb 2005, 07:09 #50

I have had only two cravings today and both were after I ate. This morning was the first time since I quit smoking 8 days ago that I did not crave a cigarette when I woke up. I even crave a cigarette right before I clean my cat's litter box, yep, use to smoke one every time i cleaned that box. Had a cigarette burning while I use to do the dishes also, so sad.

I have done a lot of drugs when I was much younger, but nothing I have done even comes close to the effects of giving up smoking, it is so powerful. One day at a time, that is how I am dealing with it, one day at a time.

It's amazing how many people smoke, I bet 95% of the people that were in my office yesterday smoked. I could smell it on them and the thought that I use to smell like that just sickens me.

My son called me today to tell me how proud he was of me Image for making it over a week so far, that call made this day just a little bit easier.

Cory
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