Smoking Triggers

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
sissy2
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:13

03 Feb 2001, 12:38 #11

Image THANK YOU JOEL,YOU HAVE ONCE AGAIN ANSWERED MY QUESTION!!!
YQS SISSY(WHAT WOULD WE DO WITHOUT YOU?)
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Feb 2001, 07:41 #12

I saw the habit/addiction debate issue up today. I am pressed for time to read it clearly but just bringing up a few articles on the difference between the two. They are both real phenomena and the first few days you all dealt with both of them concurrently. The important point to recognize is that you all got through both of them at that time. Now you have the triggers without the withdrawal complicating it. It is in a sense then a much "easier" to overcome battle, as long as you keep your initial ammunition and thus motivation to quit strong. That is the key now to overcome these obstacles. Keep reinforcing why you quit and remembering what it was truley like to be a full-fledged smoker with all of its inherent risks. By doing this you will overcome the thoughts and successfully and equally important happily never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Feb 2001, 03:12 #13

Another article for Roadmaster on how a specific stress may be a trigger. But a trigger will not cause a relapse, just a thought. A relapse will only occur if the thought leads to a puff.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Mar 2001, 21:20 #14

I saw where Joy posed a question to what is a craving. There are different kinds of "cravings" and different reasons for those kinds. Physical cravings are from the body demand of nicotine experienced during withdrawal. Psychological cravings or are really just thoughts of desire for cigarettes being elicited by a trigger. Then there are thoughts caused by triggers that are not actual cravings or desires, but just thoughts that "I used to smoke when I do did this," or even sometimes thoughts of, "Boy, am I glad I quit smoking." Those are smoking thoughts, but not a longing for smoking but more an appreciation of not smoking. I will bring up one other article that clarifies the difference between the physical and the psychological. Both are real but both will dissipate with time and experience. They will continue on a path of general easing as long as you stay focused on your resolve to stay free and as long as you never take another puff!

Joel
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brueniap(gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Apr 2001, 20:56 #15

ImageNot just for Beccy, Joel, also for Anne - thank you for always having the right post at the right time for those of us who haven't read them before!!!!
anne
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SunshineRay
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

11 May 2001, 02:33 #16

Thanks Joel. Knew I's seen this page somewhere. Found it easily as it was in a Post on the Board. Perfect. Yep, a small crisis passing now .... albeit a little too slowly. Stress, anger set me off big time. Yeah, I wouldn't feel comfortable enough to day to be exposed to sickerttes, not for a few more hours or so anyway. Calming down tho, fianlly spending time there at Freedom. Zep can always finds these real gross pictures of sick lungs. the nicorttee needle etc. Going to do everything I can to relax myself. Thank you. Still mad, but I'm on top of the situation now, and I know my rights. Smoking wouldn't cause anygood feels, perhaps a fleeting momemt or any solution. And then the guilt. Be ashamed, actually, like a weakly. sunshineray 14th day (gees 2 weeks, 1l2 way to green!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jul 2001, 18:47 #17

Again, as talked about in the string "Thought that seem worse than the first day urges," these thoughts are being triggered by associations. They have real reasons for occuring, but sometimes a person will not be able to recognize what the exact situation triggering the thought actually is. But whether or not you ever identify the exact cause of the trigger, you still break it or at least weaken it significantly none the less. For whatever it was that was causing it, you survived it without a cigarette and have taught yourself that the specific circumstance was doable without a cigarette. As more and more time passes, totally new experiences become more sporadic and these thoughts become much less infrequent. Preventing triggers from occuring may not be in any idividuals conscious control, but overcoming the thoughts and even squelching them quickly are under concsious controls. Focus all your attention on why you quit and why you don't want to go back to smoking and you will always have the ability to happily never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Jul 2001, 21:37 #18

Image For Daniela:

Paying bills (even paying off bills) can still be a trigger. It is a matter of just getting it done the first time and the association will become weaker, and after numerous times will be broken all together. Eventually not smoking will become the habit. But it takes time and more accurately, experience to break these associations. Keep focused on how much you don't want to be a smoker and deal with all the risks and consequences that go along with maintaining an expensive and lethal addicition. Keep remembering why you are here and you will stay clear in your resolve to never take another puff!

Joel
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daniw911(green)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

03 Aug 2001, 22:28 #19

jmhonline

this is what helped me that day. Take care.
Daniela
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Aug 2001, 00:43 #20

For Shacky Rose:

Being stuck in the house with a broken car can be a trigger as well as causing a bit of cabin fever kind of syndrome.
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