Smoking and Pregnancy

Smoking and Pregnancy

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2001, 20:24 #1

I saw yesterday where one member stated she was quitting smoking because she was planning for having a child and another post where a member actually found out she was pregnant. While it is always paramount for long-term success in smoking cessation that the smoker focuses on the fact that he or she is quitting for his or her own primary benefit, this is an area that a woman needs to take a little extra consideration for another life.

There are great risks posed to the unborn child if women smoke while pregnant. There is a greater risk of smaller babies, sicker babies, stillbirths, and more death within the first year of life. Children who grow up in smoking households have more chronic colds and respiratory diseases.

I haven't researched this area for quit sometime, but I know years ago that there were some pretty strong studies that showed that if women quit smoking during the first trimester of pregnancy, the risk of low birth weight babies were reduced back to non-smoking mothers again. It seemed at least at that time that a good part of the danger was induced smoking past that time period.

It is important for women who are in the stage of their lives of family planning take their smoking into consideration. The idea of just quitting to get pregnant or having a baby can pose a risk after the baby is delivered. You can figure now that the risks are now gone, you quit for the important time period. But still keep in mind that even though you did your baby a favor by quitting, you really did yourself the bigger favor.

For not only did you reduce the risk to your baby, you reduced your risk of being sicker throughout your life and eventually dying prematurely--you increased your ability to be active with your baby, throughout his or her life, even when your baby becomes an adult. You increased the odds that you will be around to see your baby eventually have children of his or her own, and even then you can be an active participant in yet another generation, as opposed to an elderly person on oxygen who watches family events from the sidelines, if you can even go to see them at all.

Quitting for pregnancy is a reason to start your quit. Staying off though is more comprehensive than this. There are many other benefits that go along with staying an ex-smoker that will stick with you throughout your entire life. To keep these benefits, always remember that the best way to improve "your" overall health and quality of life is to never take another puff!

Joel

Here is a link to the CDC fact sheet on smoking and pregnancy. There are plenty of other sites that I am sure have similar information too. I just went for the first one that popped up in a search engine.
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Amy Jane Gold
Joined: 20 Feb 2009, 23:51

08 Jun 2001, 03:36 #2

Joel,

Your post will be a great support to anyone planning to have a baby or already pregnant. I only wish I had had this kind of information when I was pregnant two years ago.

In January of 1999, once I realized I was pregnant, I had no trouble quitting smoking. In fact, it seemed absurbly easy. I was nicotine free all during my pregnancy and for my three months of maternity leave while I was breastfeeding. I never felt tempted to cheat during that almost year long period. But on the very first day on my way back to work, I stopped at a convenience store, bought a pack of smokes and never looked back.
The reason?? I hadn't yet decided to quit for MYSELF. I had only quit smoking to help ensure a healthy baby. In the back of my mind, I think I always knew I would go back to my smoking once I was able to. Now, 20 months later, I'm finally quitting for myself. There are a million other great reasons I'm quitting, too, but my main reason is me. Even though I've only quit for 3 weeks and 4 days, I'm 100 times prouder of this quit than when I quit for 11 months because I'm finally doing it ME.
And as god as my witness, this quit is definitely my last.

So anyone out there quitting because you're pregnant, make sure you read Joel's post again and again and again. It sure would have save me over a year of wasted time smoking.

Amy
Haven't smoked for 3 Weeks 5 Days 38 Minutes 29 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 260. Money saved: $58.69.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jun 2001, 03:45 #3

Hello Amy Jane:

About quitting while pregnant being absurdly easy. I have known numerous women who spontaneously quit smoking by literally, "losing their taste or stomach" for smoking, only to find out days later that they were in fact pregnant. It seems some women almost have an instinctive knowledge, or at least their bodies instinctively know that smoking and pregnancy don't mix. But it is amazing how fast the desire returns after delivery. I have had a number of women joke with me that as soon as they delivered the baby they were asking when they could have a cigarette even before they asked what the sex of the baby was.

Again, quitting for a baby will help for a nine-month period, but for a longer commitment, a lifelong commitment so to say you have to be quitting for yourself. Again, while others may benefit, even your own children, you are still the primary benefactor.

Thanks for sharing your input here. To make this quit last through all the births you ever encounter, whether it be your own children, your children's children, or all your future descendants, always remember for yourself to be smoke free for the rest of your life you must never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Oct 2001, 02:16 #4

Hello again Maggie. I see we already covered this, but it can't hurt pointing it out again.

Joel
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happycamper 67
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

23 Oct 2001, 02:25 #5

excellent
thanks!!!
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John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

31 Oct 2001, 04:13 #6

European Journal of Public Health, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp. 334-339: Abstract.

October 30, 2001

Postpartum return to smoking among usual smokers who quit during pregnancy N Lelongz, M Kaminski, M-J Saurel-Cubizolles, and M-H Bouvier-Colle

INSERM Unit 149, Epidemiological Research on Women's Health and Perinatal Health, 16 Avenue Paul Vaillant Couturier, 94807 Villejuif cedex, France
zCorresponding author
Tel: +33 1 45 595002
Fax: +33 1 45 595089

Background. Many women stop smoking while they are pregnant, but the majority resume smoking in the postpartum. The objective is to describe postpartum tobacco use of women who quit during pregnancy and factors predicting postpartum smoking relapse.

Method. Secondary analysis of two surveys of new mothers. Survey A conducted in three maternity hospitals, including 685 women interviewed after birth and who answered a postal questionnaire at 5 months postpartum; survey B conducted in four 'départements' (administrative areas), including 636 women who answered a postal questionnaire at 6 months postpartum. Response rates were respectively 90% and 68%. smoking status was recorded for three time periods: before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and at 5-6 months. Social and those who had not, and among quitters, who had resumed smoking postpartum and those who had not.

Results. In survey A, 37% were smokers before pregnancy, 34% of them stopped during pregnancy, and among the latter, 48% had resumed smoking 5-6 months after delivery. In survey B, the percentages were respectively 43, 54 and 57%. The most predictive factor of postpartum smoking relapse was the partner's smoking behaviour.

Conclusion. Return to smoking after delivery is frequent, but nearly half of the regular smokers who had stopped during pregnancy were still non-smokers 5-6 months after the birth. However, to increase this proportion, interventions need to include partners, especially if they are smokers.

Keywords: Postpartum, pregnancy, smoking partners, tobacco smoking
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Kinzismom green
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:48

31 Oct 2001, 06:09 #7

This is my story! I quit smoking the day I found out I was pregnant and didn't smoke until I had weaned my daughter. I started right back up the first chance I got!

I do have a question though~ I have heard that pregnant women shouldn't quit cold turkey? Is this true??

Tracie
One week, one day, 16 hours, 11 minutes and 41 seconds. 173 cigarettes not smoked, saving $28.19. Life saved: 14 hours, 25 minutes.
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John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

31 Oct 2001, 08:35 #8

Kinzismom, I'm sure your question comes as a bit strange to most here at Freedom as we fully admit that we are nicotine addicts so there is no other way to QUIT using nicotine than to quit using nicotine. Anything else isn't quitting.

It could be that you're referring to the potential harm to the fetus from being put into withdrawal but I've yet to see any study on specifically addressing the issue. In my last live two week clinic I had a mother who was seven months pregnant and still smoking. We spent lots of time talking about her baby being born addicted to nicotine and spending its very first day alone on earth going through physical nicotine withdrawal but to no avail. Eleven of 14 graduated, including her sister, but she wasn't among them. I think we all felt bad.
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John Gold
Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 21:43

31 Oct 2001, 08:39 #9

Correction, 9 of 14 graduated - I'm just a dreamer : )
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Oct 2001, 19:06 #10

Hello Kinzismom:

Sorry I didn't get to this yesterday although John has it covered already. There are people out there who will tell you that quitting cold turkey is too hard for all people and NRT and other pharmaceutical products will lessen the impact and improve your success. But as you see at Freedom, cold turkey is not too hard considering everyone here has pulled it off and if you talk to ex-smokers here and elsewhere who have successfully quit cold turkey and had used other miracle products in the past--that the cold turkey quit was likely no worse and in many cases even easier than the previous pharmaceutically aided attempts. But even most NRT advocates don't push the products to pregnant women leaving cold turkey the basic method of choice by most.

As far as being cold turkey possibly being too hard on your system--the short-term effects of withdrawal are nothing compared to the chronic assault of nicotine and carbon monoxide on the fetus. The risks of not quitting are real and as can be seen by the article and link above, if you are worried about the health of your baby and then your ability to be a parent to your child for a longer and healthier lifetime always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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