Smoking and Circulation

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Aug 2005, 20:10 #31

The news media this week is going all out on covering lung cancer, due to the recent death of Peter Jennings and now the announcement of Christopher Reeve's widow, a non-smoker, of getting diagnosed with lung cancer.



You can hear the angst and frustrations of many in these reports as to why there are not better diagnostic tests and treatments for lung cancer. Hopefully there will be one day, but no person should hang their hopes high that a diagnostic test or a cutting edge treatment that will save most lung cancer victims is just around the corner.



The best chance we have today to greatly reduce the number of new cases of lung cancer and to reduce the death rate from lung cancer is to get people to not smoke. No smoker should lose sight of this.



One other important issue needs to be mentioned here. If somehow miraculously someone came up with a magic cure for lung cancer that was immediately available today--the majority of people who are dying from smoking would still die. Lung cancer is not the disease that causes the most premature deaths from smoking. Cardiovascular deaths still out number lung cancer deaths, plus there are a slew of other conditions that smokers die prematurely from other than lung cancer.



The only way to minimize your chance of dying prematurely from all smoking induced illnesses is to make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.



Joel
Last edited by Joel on 14 Feb 2015, 14:52, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Jan 2006, 12:02 #32


Smoking Among Adults: Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke
  • Coronary heart disease and stroke-the primary types of cardiovascular disease caused by smoking-are the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. More than 61 million Americans suffer from some form of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. More than 2,600 Americans die every day because of cardiovascular diseases, about 1 death every 33 seconds. (p. 363)
  • Toxins in the blood from smoking cigarettes contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a progressive hardening of the arteries caused by the deposit of fatty plaques and the scarring and thickening of the artery wall. Inflammation of the artery wall and the development of blood clots can obstruct blood flow and cause heart attacks or strokes. (p. 364-365)
  • Smoking causes coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Coronary heart disease results from atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. (p. 384, 407)
  • In 2003, an estimated 1.1 million Americans had a new or recurrent coronary attack. (p. 384)
  • Cigarette smoking has been associated with sudden cardiac death of all types in both men and women. (p. 387)
  • Smoking-related coronary heart disease may contribute to congestive heart failure. An estimated 4.6 million Americans have congestive heart failure and 43,000 die from it every year. (p. 387)
  • Smoking low-tar or low-nicotine cigarettes rather than regular cigarettes appears to have little effect on reducing the risk for coronary heart disease. (p. 386, 407)
  • Strokes are the third leading cause of death in the United States. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of strokes. (p. 393)
  • The U.S. incidence of stroke is estimated at 600,000 cases per year, and the one-year fatality rate is about 30%. (p. 393)
  • The risk of stroke decreases steadily after smoking cessation. Former smokers have the same stroke risk as nonsmokers after 5 to 15 years. (p. 394)
  • Smoking causes abdominal aortic aneurysm. (p. 397)
Citation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.


Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death and has negative health impacts on people at all stages of life. It harms unborn babies, infants, children, adolescents, adults, and seniors. Source Document: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/sgr/sgr_2004 ... eets/3.htm
Public Domain
Last edited by John (Gold) on 01 Mar 2009, 16:22, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

03 Mar 2006, 02:21 #33

ImageFor Jo, who was smart enough to quit.

From above:
One condition though stands out as being truly unique and in many ways, demonstrates the real addictive nature of nicotine better than any other cause. The condition is known as Buerger's Disease (thromboangiitis obliterans.) Buerger's Disease is a condition where there is a complete cutoff of circulation to the finger or toes, resulting in gangrene.

The most common age bracket that this disease strikes is in people between the ages of 20 to 40, normally young to get circulation problems that result in amputations. While it is much more common in men, women are affected to. What makes Bueger's Disease unique is that it is a disease that is basically exclusive to smokers. There are almost no documented cases of this disease happening in a non-smoker. Smoking is the primary etiologic factor. This is a rare disease, but noteworthy because of this unique nature of happening only in smokers.

If a smoker gets lung cancer, the person and other people can sometimes think, "well non-smokers sometimes get lung cancer too, maybe cigarettes didn't cause it." Same thing with heart attacks or strokes, non-smokers get them too, smokers just get them much more often. But again a certain level of denial can be exhibited and there is no way to conclusively prove that cigarette did it. But Buerger's Disease, having no other known cause and basically never happening in non-smokers does not lend itself to such denials. When a doctor determines he or she is dealing with a Buerger's Disease patient, a basic ultimatum is going to be delivered-quit smoking or lose your limb-your choice! If we were dealing with simply a bad habit, how many people given such an ultimatum and knowing it is true would continue doing the particular behavior given such consequences?
Reply

Jacqui672 Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Apr 2006, 23:02 #34

Good stuff.Image Perhaps I'm imagining, but I swear my hands and feet are not blocks of ice anymore.
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

14 Apr 2006, 05:53 #35

The truth about smoking. Smoking ruins lives. Ours and our family's.
Never take another puff!
Reply

Jacqui672 Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Apr 2006, 23:00 #36

This is one of my most favorite threads here. I never really thought about circulation before. On this chilly rainy "Spring" Day,Image my hands are warm as can be.

Three weeks, six days, 1 minute and 24 seconds. 1080 cigarettes not smoked, saving $297.01. Life saved: 3 days, 18 hours, 0 minutes.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Oct 2006, 05:46 #37

If you read this article you will see how the oxygen demands of the heart are increased because of carbon monoxide exposure from smoking. If a person has lung problems, this even creates a more dangerous scenario, for the lungs have to work get more oxygen to the heart to meet the hearts increased oxygen demands. The lungs are semi-impaired in getting meeting the oxygen demands. The blood is having a harder time carrying the oxygen. This means the heart as to work harder, to get more blood and more oxygen to itself, because it is working harder. It is a vicious and deadly circle that will stop the day you quit smoking and will never be repeated as long as you stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

05 Jan 2007, 09:27 #38

By quitting you are most probably extending and improving the quality of the rest of your life!

Never take another puff, no nicotine today, one day at a time.
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

29 Mar 2007, 06:06 #39

From: Cindy K Sent: 3/28/2007 9:12 AM
Thank you for bringing this up front again. This is a real biggie for me.
To have it brought up today was really neat since I TURNED GREEN TODAY!!!!

My Doctor had told me years ago that she thought I had Buergers Disease. I'm not sure if I really have it or if it is just circulation problems. My hands and feet were always cold and at times it was almost like you could see my veins running thru my arms and legs, they were so purple! My toes were very touchy and would hurt terribly....my toe nails also started looking very bad the last year or so.
But, that didn't convince me to quit....I really started getting serious about getting in shape and started a new workout. I could handle the workout physically but, I would have to stop because I couldn't catch my breath.
That really bothered me. So, after doing nicotine lozenges and trying to cut back and all that. I finally found this site and read, and read, and read some more.
When I knew I was ready...I stopped smoking. It has been the single hardest thing that I have ever done....and the most rewarding. I am so proud of myself!
I'm working out in the mornings now. I have the time and the energy now.
My breathing is still and issue but my toes don't hurt and my nails are already looking much better.
I have no doubt that if I wouldn't have stopped smoking that I would be one of those people who would have lost toes, feet, my legs....and, probably my life, much too early!

Thank you for being here for me!
Cindy Image
My Quit Date 2/28/07. I have been Free & Healing for One Month, 4 Hours and 12 Minutes, while extending my life 1 Day and 15 Hours, by avoiding the use of 479 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $89.91.


Edited for brand name
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Sep 2007, 18:49 #40

Potentially Reduced Exposure Cigarettes Accelerate Atherosclerosis: Evidence for the Role of Nicotine

Cardiovascular Toxicology
DOI 10.1007/s12012-007-0027-z
Daniel F. Catanzaro Ying Zhou Rong Chen Fangmin Yu Sarah E. Catanzaro Mariana S. De Lorenzo Kotha Subbaramaiah Xi Kathy Zhou Domenico Pratico Andrew J. Dannenberg Babette B. Weksler

Abstract

The tobacco industry markets potentially reduced exposure products (PREPs) as less harmful or addictive alternatives to conventional cigarettes. This study compared the effects of mainstream smoke from Quest, Eclipse, and 2R4F reference cigarettes on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE -/-) mice. Mice were exposed to smoke from four cigarette 18 types for 12 weeks beginning at age of 12 weeks, and in a separate study for 8 weeks, beginning at age of 8 weeks. In both studies, mice exposed to smoke from high-nicotine, high-tar Quest 1, and 2R4F cigarettes developed greater areas of lipid-rich aortic lesions than did non-smoking controls. Exposure to smoke from the lower-nicotine products, Eclipse, and Quest 3, was associated with smaller lesion areas, but animals exposed to smoke from all of the tested types of cigarette had larger lesions than did control animals not exposed to smoke. Urinary levels of isoprostane F2 alpha VI, increased proportionally to cigarette nicotine yield, whereas induction of pulmonary cytochrome P4501A1 was proportional to tar yield. Lesion area was associated with both nicotine and tar yields, although in multiple regression analysis only nicotine was a significant predictor of lesion area. Smoke exposure did not alter systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), blood cholesterol, or leukocyte count. Taken together, these observations suggest that smoking may accelerate atherosclerosis by increasing oxidative stress mediated at least in part via the actions of nicotine.

Keywords

Isoprostane - Oxidative stress - cytochrome - P450 - Sympathetic nervous system - Complete blood count http://humanapress.com/index.php?option ... y=journals
http://member.globalink.org/nimi/19001 [NIMI 12-9-07]
Reply