Sleep Adjustments

Physical healing of the body and mind
Joel
Joel

December 11th, 2001, 8:47 pm #11

For Kughes:

This article is laying out the issues surrounding sleep adjustments for just quitting smoking. Other issues can complicate or prolong the adjustment period. Coming off other drugs and the use of yet other new introduced medications can also cause similar effects, basically extending the adjustment period and problems associated with sleep disruption. Talk to your physician as to the best route to go now to minimize the effects you may be having while at the same time being careful not to take on any new potential long term problems without fully understanding the possible implications.
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candy tasi
candy tasi

January 27th, 2002, 2:52 am #12

Hi!

As for sleeping - I sure did sleep some more during the first days of my quit - but after the first week passed, I woke up one day with a clear head and could concentrate and start my day as soon as I opened my eyes.

That was (after 20 years of smoking) a new and fantastic feelings for me. When a smoker, I needed some time, perheps half an hour or more to start functioning (plus other stimulants like coffee). Waking up with a clear head is currently on the top of my "benefits from quitting smoking list".

Candy
2 weeks 1 day of freedom
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Joel
Joel

February 12th, 2002, 11:13 pm #13

I see where a few members are bringing up the issue of sleep disruption today. Anyone experiencing such problems the first week or two after quitting probably are just having adjustment issues from quitting smoking. But a health care professional should evaluate disruptions that are lasting longer, especially past a month. Many problems can cause such sleep disruptions, medical, psychological, medication reactions, etc. It is just impossible to determine underlying causes online. Blaming symptoms on quitting smoking for a few days is probably warranted in most cases, but at longer periods of time other causes need to be considered and investigated.

Joel
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murphying (Gold)
murphying (Gold)

August 19th, 2002, 4:34 am #14

Hi Vanda!
Just a quick one as I'm on the way out.....just had to say that I spent the first month of my quit asleep and also wondered if it would never end - I used to have a nap during the day (every day!) and still felt tired at night! All I can say is that it eventually does go and things return to normal.....although having said that, I find one benefit is that I sleep like a baby now at night!

If you're really concerned - take a trip to your doctor and have a chat about it.

Hang in there - you've got a great quit going.

yqs Ingrid
7 Months 2 Weeks 3 Days
Cigarettes not smoked: 11482.
Self esteem 100%
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Vanda(BRONZE)
Vanda(BRONZE)

August 19th, 2002, 4:42 am #15

Thanks Ingrid that's all I needed to hear :)

I guess I just have an excuse to be lazy for a bit longer lol.
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Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200
Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200

August 19th, 2002, 7:49 am #16

2 months on and havent´t found a decent sleep pattern. I Will try the sleep less options.

Well

I also have had a kid, just 3 weeks ago, and there is stress on business.


juan
NO NICOTINE AT ALL for 2m1w6d20h24m34s
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 7th, 2004, 5:24 am #17


If trouble sleeping be sure and consider the fact that
nicotine is somehow able to accelerate the rate at which
the body metabolizes caffeine by 203%. Look at it this
way, it's cheaper being an ex-smoker because you don't
need as much caffeine to get the same kick.
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 16th, 2009, 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Gooddiva
Gooddiva

July 21st, 2004, 7:22 am #18

Hello all!!
My name is Elise - a quitter of 120 hours. Its really amazing how much better I feel already. Physically (you know, the clearer lungs, the lack of wheeze etc etc.)
I've quit before (as we all have) but this time IS different because I'm educating myself.

I have noticed the last 2 nights have been miserable sleep wise - just not able to fall into a deep sleep. This has never happened before when quitting - it certainly isn't a reason to start smoking (EEEEEEEEWWWWW) again but I'm wondering how long I can expect this to go on. (i'm in my 5th day of quit)

Is it different for everyone?

Diva E
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Mocha
Mocha

July 27th, 2004, 10:48 pm #19

Hi Diva!

I'm on my 7th day and it started for me a couple of days ago with me virtually getting no sleep at all last night (after having a nightmare of smoking a cigarette, i panicked). Anyway, last night I took the advice of one of the posters here who suggested you do everything your body is telling you to do, to include going to bed when your body is telling you to.

And so I did. Normally I am a night owl. Last night I went to bed at 10:00 pm and woke up refreshed. But I still woke up every couple of hours, never able to REALLY fall into a good nights rest. I think that will come though.

but I will definitly pay better attention to my bodys wants the next few weeks. It deserves it after all the pain and strain I've put it through.

Good Nights!
Nastassja
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Estarrio13
Estarrio13

August 25th, 2004, 10:09 am #20

I'm on day 13...I have no trouble getting to sleep but I notice that I consistantly wake up 4 or 5 hours into my sleep. After getting up, I can't get back to sleep. I do feel FAR less tired throughout the day than if I were still smoking and slept for 6 hours though!!! My dreams are also far more vivid and memorable.

I work an office job and have put exercise aside while focusing on my quit (going back to exercising tomorrow) so I wonder if all I've been needing was the four or five hours? Seems crazy! I'm sure a good jog and some weight lifting will make me more tired at night. Incidentally I quit abruptly in the middle of a day when I read about the effects that smoking had on my exercising.

Jason - Free and Healing for Thirteen Days, 7 Hours and 34 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 22 Hours, by avoiding the use of 266 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $67.95.
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kadterp
kadterp

August 29th, 2004, 10:35 pm #21

Im on day 18 and still to this day I am waking up in the middle of the night. Before it was really bad, every hour on the hour, but now it is only once! I know that it will be better once I get back into the groove of things now that the kids are going back to school so Im sure that I wont be waking up in the middle of the night. Hang in there everyone!
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CMondragon21170
CMondragon21170

September 1st, 2004, 3:57 am #22

Sunday night (day 10) was the first night I slept through the night w/out getting up every hour. Even falling asleep was crazy-I would twitch right at that moment that I was drifting off. It was disturbing at first, but I realized that my body was going to probably do tricks for awhile until my state of normal returned.
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sharpsper1
sharpsper1

November 7th, 2004, 7:05 am #23

I found this quite interesting, in the week leading up to my quit date, I was worried about sleep issues. From day one I have s;ept better, been able to wake earlier and enjoyed much more energy from the onset. I'll admit this strengthens me, I feel great about not having to drag myself out of bed. I used to wake around 7:30 to get the kids ready for school, and spend the morning rushing adn being grumpy at everyone. I now wake before the alarm at 6:00 a.m and spend time quitely with the kids before we start our mad rush. It's great.
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lizzy19595
lizzy19595

November 7th, 2004, 12:53 pm #24

Hello all

Sad to say that when I smoked I slept like a log. Since I quit 54 days ago there has not been one full night of sleep. I'm waking up ++ and basically dozing most of the night. I did go to my doc to get something and even that really doesn't help much. My quit remains secure despite this but I have a few questions and wondered if any one had some information.


1] what is the longest anyone has experienced sleep problems?
2] can nicotine use mask a sleep disorder?
Last edited by lizzy19595 on March 16th, 2009, 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

January 2nd, 2006, 3:34 pm #25

Not every Quitter has sleep changes.

It took me a little while to adjust. Sleep has been much better for a very, very long time now!

Kay (Gold x 2)
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Kristie
Kristie

March 2nd, 2006, 9:34 pm #26

As usual, this was how it happened for me. The first week I had trouble getting to sleep. Now, I'm sleeping great and waking up alert. Having this information before you quit is extremely helpful. You don't have to deal with the stress of wondering if you are ever going to get another good nights sleep.
Thanks, Kristie


Kristie - Free and Healing for Thirteen Days, 11 Hours and 3 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 22 Hours, by avoiding the use of 269 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $43.64.
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Gold Massabe2006
Gold Massabe2006

May 12th, 2006, 10:27 pm #27

It is nice to read about the things I am experiencing as I progress through this journey. I have been waking up atleast 2 times a night wide awake and at the same time waking up in the morning feeling more rested and alert than I have in years. Incredible.

Dave - Free and Healing for Four Days, 12 Hours and 26 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 7 Hours, by avoiding the use of 90 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $15.82.
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Kara anne
Kara anne

August 29th, 2006, 10:45 pm #28

Good to know :) NTAP!
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Joel
Joel

January 8th, 2007, 8:18 pm #29

I saw where a newer member off for almost two weeks now found herself waking up before her alarm and feeling more alert and refreshed than ever, basically on less sleep than when she was smoking. This string addresses this reaction.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

September 2nd, 2008, 11:58 pm #30

From above:
Sleep can get pretty disruptive the first few days. Some people will get very little sleep, waking up every hour or not sleeping at all yet not feel tired. Others can sleep 20 hours a day and be exhausted during their waking hours. Whichever way it goes, sleep will adjust itself when you quit and eventually go back to normal.

But there is a catch. You don't know what normal is. Normal is what it was prior to being a smoker with aging thrown in. Some people have not been normal for decades.
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Photo Larry
Photo Larry

January 28th, 2009, 2:17 am #31

I am one of those odd ball people who smoked only before I went to bed! Yes like an idiot I would puff two or three, have my heart racing, unable to breathe normally, and thought somehow this was aiding in getting me to sleep! Stupid fool! I would have to get up after about 4 hours after going to bed because naturally my body wanted yet more nicotine, I smoked 3 more, went back to sleep for 4 more hours. And I complained over and over about how I had sleeping difficulties which could not be overcome without cigarettes! Yes addiction is powerful, and illogical. I have a scientific college degree. One would think I would be smart enough to know better. Well luckily I figured out my error before I killed myself. I learned that nothing is worth sacrificing my health for. Not one puff, or one thousand. Thanks for adding me to the group. I look forward to participating. I was referred by friends. They highly recommended I use these boards in helping me stay quit. Thanks again.

Larry
Last edited by Photo Larry on January 28th, 2009, 2:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Photo Larry
Photo Larry

March 26th, 2009, 7:29 am #32

Here is my very odd story. I am fairly sure that I smoked for a very very unique reason. I was under the delusion that it actually was HELPING me get sleep. Well this nicotine addict is finished. I no longer am allowing it to ruin my sleeping patterns. I would smoke a few RIGHT at bed time. Well guess what happens? My heart rate increases, my blood pressure drops, and of course, the nicotine stimulates my brain, thus, I am not falling asleep normally. About an hour later, after heavy breathing caused by the smoking, I would eventually fall asleep. But this was poor sleep as I woke up 3 hours(max) later, since my body told my brain, ok nicotine has dropped, wake up, smoke more, now go back to bed. I then would sleep 2 hours, and repeat the same pattern. So in effect, I would get about 7 hours total at most, with worst episodes of waking up 3 times during the night to smoke again. I was such an addict, so pathetic, that I went ALL day long, from the time I awoke, say about 9am, all day, until midnight. Not one cigarette. Then because there was a trigger(mental) in my brain telling me, hey this is what you do before bed time, I went outside, and smoked 2-4 cigarettes, depending on my mood level. How and why would I do such a thing? No benefits at all. In fact quite the opposite. I would wake up multiple times, and feel guilty the next day for doing such an ignorant thing. Hence the only thing I can call this: "Severe Nicotine Addiction"
I do hope that I am able to get a full nights sleep at some point (so far I still awake once or twice to use the bathroom) but I guess I will not know what real sleep is like until I have been quit for a few months and my lungs begin to recover from 20 years of damage. Thanks for listening. Larry
Last edited by Photo Larry on March 26th, 2009, 12:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 26th, 2009, 6:02 pm #34

Actually, needing to smoke in order to sleep is not that unusual of an occurrence. In clinics I had plenty of people report that they often woke up in the middle of the night because they needed a cigarette and were only able to fall back to sleep by smoking one or two. I always pointed out to them how clearly this showed them the nature of their addiction, having to wake up to take a stimulant drug (nicotine) in order to be able to fall back to sleep. There were also people who smoked heavily in the evening in order to get their nicotine levels high enough as to be able to sleep longer before going into withdrawal. Again, they were people who were overdosing on nicotine which was likely disrupting the overall quality of their sleep but it was the only way they could seem to manage to sleep at all when quitting. They needed to titrate their nicotine levels to minimize withdrawal symptoms long enough to allow them to sleep for any extended time period.

I need to point out that these are different people than those who smoked more at the end of the day purposely in order to stay awake longer so as to watch late night television or do late night projects. These people, who are probably more common are smoking more at the tail end of the day precisely to stay awake longer using nicotine's quality as a stimulant drug.

This article addresses these people:

How Would You Deal With the Following Situations?
How would you deal with
the following situations?


Your 2-year-old is having a temper tantrum because he wants a new toy. Would you;
  1. Leave him alone until he calmed down
  2. Give into his demands
  3. Give him a tranquilizer
Your 7-year-old is anxious about next weeks' Little League tryouts. Would you;
  1. Assure him that he can do it
  2. Practice with him and tell him to try his best
  3. Give him a valium every three hours until the game
Your 14-year-old is crushed when she is not asked to the sophomore dance. Would you;
  1. Fix her up with one of your friend's children
  2. Tell her to go anyway
  3. Give her cocaine to pick up her spirits
Your 15-year-old is self-conscious about being 5 pounds overweight. Would you;
  1. Cook lower calorie meals
  2. Enroll her in a diet or exercise program
  3. Put her on appetite suppressants

All of these young people are experiencing what adults would consider "growing pains." A little time, patience and positive reassuring will help them overcome all of these difficult situations.

The fact is, as long as anyone continues to develop physically, emotionally, intellectually, professionally or spiritually, they too will experience growing pains. Adults are prone to hurt, pain, sadness, depression and anxiety just as children are. These feelings are all necessary if we wish to continue to develop our minds and bodies. Without such growth, we would not experience happiness, satisfaction, contentment or purpose to their full extent.

The third choice in each of the above situations was, of course, ridiculous. We would not subject our children to chemical hazards to overcome such trivial problems. However, as adults we are fully capable of practicing such dangerous behaviors for our own relief. Take cigarette smoking as an example.

When you were still a smoker, how many times would you say you had to smoke because you were lonely and sad without your friendly cigarettes? How many times did you say that you had to smoke because of all the stress in your life? How many times did you tell yourself that many social activities were just not fun without your cigarettes? How many times did you say that you would gain too much weight if you quit smoking? All you were saying was that you needed nicotine, a drug, to overcome everyday life problems.

It was not until you were off cigarettes that you realized you could overcome such problems without smoking, and in most cases more effectively than when you were a smoker. Once you had quit you realized just how much a source of stress the habit was to you. You were caught by a socially unacceptable and physically deadly addiction and were quite often aware of it. This is when you had the desire to give them up, but thought the pain of quitting too great to even attempt it.

Even today, you probably still desire an occasional cigarette. It may be in a stressful situation, at a party after a few drinks, or at a time when you find yourself alone with nothing better to do. The fact is, there is nothing worse you can do than take a cigarette. One cigarette will not help you over the problem. In reality, it will create a new problem, a disastrous situation of a reinforced addiction, with all the physical dangers and associated dirty habits.

So, next time you have the desire for a cigarette, sit back and take a few moments to reflect upon what you are setting yourself up for. Do you need that drug? Do you want that addiction? If not, simply remember - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!



© Joel Spitzer 1982, 2000

Read the links JoeJ put up for you. They really help to clarify the reasons you smoke.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 26th, 2009, 6:27 pm #35

Another related article:

Using cigarettes to self medicate certain medical conditions

There are likely some people who smoke in order to self-medicate themselves for certain conditions that they have. What these people need to understand though is the problem with the "medication" (their cigarettes) that they have chosen to use to treat a condition. The medication (cigarettes) they are using has certain undesirable side effects. Think of it this way. Lets say that you have a medical or emotional condition that causes you some level of discomfort. Nothing life threatening, just a problem that is causing some minor disruption in your day to day function. You go to your pharmacy and look through the over the counter remedies and find one that says it "may" be able to treat your exact condition. You buy it.

When you get home you start to read the dosing instructions and contraindications of usage. The medication has the following standard warning:

Medication is habit forming. Medication leads to addiction to most people who use it. Medication known to be one of the most addictive drugs known to man. Medication contains the following ingredients, followed by a list of four thousand chemicals, some with familiar names like arsenic, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide and many many others. Medication known to cause cancer in rodents. Medication known to cause cancer in humans. Medication known to cause heart disease, strokes, peripheral vascular diseases. Medication known to destroy lung tissue. Medication known to cause chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Medication is known to be the most recognized cause of premature death in the United States. Medication known to cripple millions of people worldwide every year. Medication known to kill over 4.9 million people worldwide every year. Medication known to kill one out of every two people who use it.

On top of this you calculate the cost of using this medication over your lifetime, which is how it is going to be used if you start it now, and you realize it is going to cost you tens of thousands of dollars over your lifetime. No insurance company will ever cover its costs and in fact, most likely all of your insurance companies are going to charge you higher premiums for your lifetime because you use the medication.

Considering all of the above consequences--do you take the medication? One more thing--there are other medications on the market that actually can treat your condition, that have no known life threatening health effects.

I think any rational person would try to get a refund for the purchased medication. There is probably only one group of people who would take the medication considering the above implications. It is the ones who had been taking it for years already, who may have started before they knew or fully understood all of the problems the drug would cause. Now they may believe the warnings but they like most others who used it are caught in the active grip of the addiction of the drug. They believe that they have lost choice in the matter. They are users and they believe they are stuck that way for the rest of their life.

Hopefully, somewhere in fine print on the box will be an instruction that says, medication is addictive and deadly, but can be stopped if a person simply makes and sticks to a personal commitment to never take another dose.

Joel
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