Setting Quit Dates

Joel
Joel

December 29th, 2007, 11:11 pm #26

A lot of people have probably set New Years as a quit date. I am going to make a suggestion here for those who have who happen to be reading here in advance of their quits. There is really no reason for you to have to wait until New Years to quit.

As this article discusses, most successful quitters didn't plan in advance to quit. You can actually quit now if you want. You might just find yourself enjoying New Years Eve and New Years Day a whole lot more, not dreading what "might" happen over the next few days but instead really starting to feel a sense of relief from the easing of whatever sypmtoms "may have" occurred, and actually starting out 2008 with your body truly nicotine free. Then all you will have to do the rest of the year (as well as the rest of your life) to sustain your quit is to simply remember One day at a time to Never take another puff .

Joel
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

August 4th, 2008, 9:50 pm #27

Circumstances surrounding how most people quit:
People are going to pretty much fall into one of three categories of stories. They are:
  • People who awoke one day and were suddenly sick and tired of smoking. They tossed them that day and never looked back.
  • People who get sick. Not smoking sick, meaning some kind of catastrophic smoking induced illness. Just people who get a cold or a flu and feel miserable. They feel too sick to smoke, they may feel too sick to eat. They are down with the infection for two or three days, start to get better and then realize that they have a few days down without smoking and decide to try to keep it going. Again, they never look back and stuck with their new commitment.
  • People who leave a doctors office who have been given an ultimatum. Quit smoking or drop dead--it's your choice. These are people for whom some sort of problem has been identified by their doctors, who lay out in no uncertain terms that the person's life is at risk now if they do not quit smoking.
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Joel
Joel

August 9th, 2008, 7:48 am #28

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Joel
Joel

September 13th, 2008, 7:15 pm #29

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Joel
Joel

October 11th, 2008, 6:39 am #30

Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Date Created
How did the people you know quit smoking? 1.90mb 18.8mb 2.34mb 05:10 09/27/06
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Joel
Joel

November 6th, 2008, 7:45 am #31

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Joel
Joel

November 21st, 2008, 8:31 am #32

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Joel
Joel

November 30th, 2008, 12:04 am #33

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

January 6th, 2009, 1:32 am #34

From original post by Joel:
........Getting back to real world experience though, the best people to talk to when it comes to quitting smoking are those who have successfully quit and have successfully stayed off for a significant period of time. These are people who have proven that their technique in quitting was viable considering they have quit and they are still smoke free. Talk to everyone you know who is off all nicotine for a year or longer and find out how they initially quit smoking. You will be amazed at the consistency of the answer you get if you perform that little survey.
People are going to pretty much fall into one of three categories of stories. They are:
  • People who awoke one day and were suddenly sick and tired of smoking. They tossed them that day and never looked back.
  • People who get sick. Not smoking sick, meaning some kind of catastrophic smoking induced illness. Just people who get a cold or a flu and feel miserable. They feel too sick to smoke, they may feel too sick to eat. They are down with the infection for two or three days, start to get better and then realize that they have a few days down without smoking and decide to try to keep it going. Again, they never look back and stuck with their new commitment.
  • People who leave a doctors office who have been given an ultimatum. Quit smoking or drop dead--it's your choice. These are people for whom some sort of problem has been identified by their doctors, who lay out in no uncertain terms that the person's life is at risk now if they do not quit smoking.
All of these stories share one thing in common--the technique that people use to quit. They simply quit smoking one day. The reasons they quit varied but the technique they used was basically the same. If you examine each of the three scenarios you will also see that none of them lend themselves to long-term planning--they are spur of the moment decisions elicited by some external circumstance.
I really do encourage all people to do this survey, talking to long- term ex-smokers in their real world, people who they knew when they were smokers, who they knew when they quit and who they still know as ex- smokers. The more people do this the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must never take another puff!
Joel
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