Patticake (Gold)
Patticake (Gold)

February 13th, 2001, 1:38 am #11

Thank you Joel for getting me back on track where I can get things back into perspective. You are absolutely right, parts of my day yesterday were absolutely great. Lesson learned. Well Nicodemon who got the last laugh here? FREEDOM......that's who.
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Joel
Joel

February 28th, 2001, 9:01 pm #12

I know I just brought this one up a few days ago but Kim was having a bad day. But from the look of her last post she woke up the next morning to a good day. This is important to recognize. Having a bad day and not smoking gives the real opportunity to waking up the next day with many things being better. Sure there may still be some unresolved issues hung over from the day before. Maybe even some new problems. But you have another whole day now to work on them. And if you don't resolve everything that day there will always be tomorrow. Sooner of later the problem of today will be resolved with time.

But taking a cigarette because of a problem is different. Because you will not wake up the next day with just the same problem. You will wake up the next day with the same problem and a whole lot bigger problem than you woke up the previous day with-an active addiction, a need for a drug. A drug that is either going to put you into a major withdrawal or is going to be continued day after day. A drug addiction that doesn't ease up with time but just gets stronger and more dangerous. Most important it is an addiction that will not give you more time to resolve itself or any other life issues, but one in fact that will give you less time overall to deal with life problems but also to experience life's joys too. It basically comes down to being an addiction that will steal your time by shortening your life.

Again, surviving even a bad day smoke free makes it a good day by definition, when considering the grand scheme of things. To make today a good day and all the others to follow always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

February 28th, 2001, 9:18 pm #13

Thank God these "bad days" (or bad moments?) do pass and we can wake up to a new day, grateful that we got through the last one, (no matter how skew-iff!!??) smoke and nicotine free!!
It does get better.
YQS Maz


NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!
One month, one week, one day, 21 minutes and 35 seconds of FREEDOM!!
Last edited by mirigirl (silver) on March 20th, 2009, 4:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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LadyJen22
LadyJen22

March 26th, 2001, 6:25 am #14

Thanks for bringing this up for me Joel. It's great to have such support.
We have all probably heard the saying, "A Bad Day at the Beach is better than a Good Day at Work."
Well, I think we should coin a new phrase:

"A Bad Day Not Smoking is BETTER than a Good Day Smoking!"

Jen
1M, 2W, 2D Smoke Free
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Patticake (Gold)
Patticake (Gold)

March 26th, 2001, 10:53 am #15

I suppose not having the habit to lean on and learning to lean on myself has been my greatest hurdle. I have really been taking a good look at myself, seemed everything (almost) I did nicotine was involved. One of my rituals was a smoke and a Dr. Pepper in the evenings. Had to learn to undo that habit. Gads I wasted a lot of time, nicotine this, nicotine that, no wonder this is called Freedom. I have really had some 'bad times' getting from 1/17/01 to today....even had some times when I had a hard time remembering why I wanted to quit in the first place. Even had some days when I looked in the mirror and said "hi, who are you today'. Even had some days when I wished I could crawl under the bed with my cats and sleep eighteen hours like they do. Then one day it suddenly occured to me that yes enemy #1 was nicotine, but enemy #2 was 'moi'. I had convinced myself I was having a horrible time simply because I had noticed someone else was and I was just following the herd. Actually after I had completed a mental inventory I discovered I felt pretty darn good. I checked a lot of the notes I had made in my journal and discovered that a lot of them were a hoot. Now I admit this is not something I EVER want to go through again. I smoked for 40+years and I have a lot of history with the stinking things but I honestly can't think of a day/moment that was so bad that I couldn't go through it again and relapse. I asked my God for help on January 17th, he led me here, now that was a very good day.
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Joel
Joel

May 18th, 2001, 11:52 am #16

I haven't been able to spend a lot of time here the past few days. It seems a number of people are experiencing what they think of as bad days. Everyone should work at keeping things in perspective. Life goes on without smoking and sometimes things will be bad that have nothing to do with smoking and or quitting.

But I think if everyone really considers the full implications of smoking, they will realize that that even bad days are better days than they would be if you were still a smoker. More significant, if you compare your bad days to people on oxygen for the rest of their lives because they are permanently pulmonary cripples, or people on chemotherapy trying to save their lives from cancer, or people in the end stages of smoking induced conditions that have no real effective treatments, they will realize that the bad days they are now having are a walk in the park compared to these patients bad days. In fact, your bad days are probably better than these people's good days.

If in doubt of this concept, go to www.whyquit.com and take a read of the ALA Wall of Remembrance or take a look at Bryan's story and see which of these people's life stories would you consider trading positions with. Trouble in relationships, job troubles, sleep disturbances, even depression, if compared to these tragic stories should help make you realize what you have gained by quitting as opposed to lamenting of the problems that you may perceive quitting has caused. In most cases quitting hasn't caused your problems, life has. Cigarettes won't resolve problems either, just add new ones to them that are usually more serious than the problem leading you to want a cigarette. Life goes on after quitting. In fact it will likely go on longer and you will go on significantly healthier as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Keilit (Gold )
Keilit (Gold )

June 14th, 2001, 7:50 am #17

I just wanted to say this. I was reading this thread today and saw that a month ago JoAnne brought this up for me, I guess I was having a bad day. I honestly don't remember anymore.
Today I had another bad day, but it was still a wondeful day. Because no matter how badly things went, or how I embarasssed myself in front of my fiance's family (ugh! I think falling into the pool fully dressed, says enough here!)
I NEVER thought about having a smoke, even with other people who were there smoking like chimneys.
So, for all the lurkers and newbies, it really does get better, and we really do learn how to control our emotions without nicotine. And it feels great!
-Heather
One month, one week, four days, 10 hours, 39 minutes and 48 seconds. 424 cigarettes not smoked, saving $90.19. Life saved: 1 day, 11 hours, 20 minutes.
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Joel
Joel

September 22nd, 2001, 7:53 pm #18

I think with the recent tragedies that we have been encountering as a country and a world-the concept of "Bad Days" is being felt by many. I think that the message in this string is so important under such time periods.

That while days that were and still are being experienced by some of our members are possibly some of the worst days they have ever experienced in their lives and hopefully will be the worst they will ever have to encounter again-the fact that they got through them without smoking is a tremendous tribute to their ability to remain smoke free.

I hate to use the term "good day" in reference to these particular days and the smoking issue because the concept of these being "good days" for anything seems to be beyond comprehension. But the fact that they survived these days smoke free should prove to them and the rest of us beyond a shadow of a doubt that even under the worst conditions imaginable-your life can go on without smoking. Without question your life will go on better and less complicated and you will actually be better able to cope with the bad times as well as the good times as long as you remain nicotine free by always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

February 8th, 2002, 9:03 am #19

For people who were experiencing a "bad day" yesterday. Life goes on without smoking and life will have its good days and bad days. Quitting smoking helps insure you will overall have more days, and because of better health you will be able to more fully enjoy the good days and even be better equipped mentally and physically to handle the bad days too.

Bad situations (death, illness, relationship problems, work troubles or job losses, bad economic times, etc.) will still occur and make for down times. But time helps all of us assimilate even the most tragic of circumstances and we bounce back to carry on with our lives. Even after the death of those closest to us, over time we can get back to happy and fulfilling lives.

Time does not improve smoking though. Smoking gets worse and worse over time, and your health deteriorates more and more over time. The kind of damage smoking can induce does not always lend itself to just bad days or bad moments in a day--it can lead to pain and discomfort that continues till death ends the chronic suffering.

Again, while it may sound cliché and flippant, any day you overcome every obstacle smoke free was a good day in that one respect. That one respect helped to extend your health and save your life. Take satisfaction in your accomplishment for that day. To feel the same satisfaction everyday, remember what a good job you did staying smoke free yesterday and vow today to recommit to never take another puff!

Joel
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Felicia GOLD
Felicia GOLD

March 20th, 2002, 8:44 pm #20

I needed this one today! I feel like I'm on a rollarcoaster, one really really great day, then a few "bad" days, one really really great day, a few "bad" days. Ugh! Yesterday, I turned green and just assumed that I would feel like taking on the world...NOT. Yes, I was very proud on the inside but still struggling through a day of "nothing going right" and no energy. But, as you said here...it WAS a good day because I didn't take a puff...not one. There are positives to everything, just have to look for them. Thanks!

felicia
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 1 Day 7 Hours 44 Minutes 50 Seconds.
I've reclaimed 4 Days 1 Hr 44 Mins 33 Secs of my life.
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misledfairy
misledfairy

May 11th, 2002, 8:15 pm #21

"balance the message, by how you feel at the end of the day,that you are still smoke free" ( last paragraph) With my hand on my heart I can honestly say that I am sooo relieved, that is the closest I have been to relapsing and I would not have been able to look at myself today if I had relapsed, and the thought of all that effort away up in smoke (literally) Thank goodness I came here first, I keep saying this but the people here are second to none....they carried me through my worst time.

Love naymor xxxx
5 weeks 3 days 15 hours 12 mins
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DubiouslyDos
DubiouslyDos

July 13th, 2002, 12:37 am #22

It's good to know that difficulties are part of life....of course we all do know that....somehow we get confused in our addiction and think that smoking solves that???? Or it makes us immune???? Call me k-ra-zy....but isn't it more like, our problems may still be there...our priorities...as junkies...are somewhere else????


Dubiously Dos
Green with Bronze Ambitions....hee hee
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Joel
Joel

July 28th, 2002, 7:20 pm #23

For David:

While the title here refers to "Bad Days," it really is talking about some days do have bad moments. As more time passes, these moments become much rarer, eventually days, weeks, and then even months can pass without any thoughts for cigarettes at all. But again, every now and them thoughts and moments will be triggered. These thoughts too will pass into oblivion and your quit will stay secure and strong as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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David Gold
David Gold

July 28th, 2002, 7:39 pm #24

Thanks Joel,
Every time I get a crave I tell myself that this is just another smoking memory that is being replaced with a non smoking one and I've only got a few million more to go. My point is that I am prepared to fight this for the rest of my life. I know that as time goes on I won't have to fight as much as I did when I first quit.
Thanks,
David
Free for 1 month and 1 day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Last edited by David Gold on April 12th, 2009, 5:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

October 18th, 2002, 7:12 am #25

For anyone experiencing a bad day--even if it is only 8:30 am where you are at.

Today will end up a better day than it would have been if you don't break your promise to yourself to never take another puff!

Joel

One side note here. I did a seminar last night with six people in it. One was a woman who once had a five year quit going. That quit ended in 1971. She had one other three year quit a few years later. All in all the first puff she took that caused the relapse in 1971 has translated to over a quarter century of smoking. I think she was at a pack and a half a day although I am not sure of that number. If the number of cigarettes per day was 30 a day though, she has smoked over 273,000 cigarettes because of that puff. In retorspect that day was a bad day indeed.
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latina36 (double green)
latina36 (double green)

October 31st, 2002, 11:17 pm #26

Last night I got into a huge argument, so it was a bad night.....I did not smoke........last night I was furious...I did not smoke......last night I was hurt......I did not smoke..........HURRAY!!!!! for me I did not smoke!!! That in itself is amazing for me.................thank you freedom for being here for me
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 week 3 days 12 hours, I have saved 92.06 and I havenot smoked 368 sickerettes.
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

November 27th, 2002, 5:14 am #27

2 perspectives.

There is no situation. No matter how horrific, stressful or painful, that cannot be made worse by returning to smoking.


No matter how bad today was.... no matter who stomped on me, ticked me off, hurt my feelings or trashed my life..... at the very least, I didn't smoke.

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Joel
Joel

November 27th, 2002, 8:01 pm #28

Did you ever notice how we can do days, weeks or sometimes months without a single person feeling the need to post an SOS or a 911 or a totally miserable day and then all of a sudden, we see one after another all at the same time? Well yesterday seemed to be one of those days where negativity just seemed to be abound.

For all of our newer members, go look at posts from two day ago, and last week and last month and see how many look like yesterday did. It is important that you realize what you were witnessing here then was not the norm. Don't walk away with the idea that longer term quitters are not in constant withdrawals and also know that most are not in constant internal battles with chronic thoughts either. What you were witnessing was a few people having a bad day.

Over the years I have done two types of Stop Smoking Clinics. The first is community based, and the other is corporate based. In the community based programs, we would normally get anywhere from 10 to 60 people. While a few may know each other before hand, most are strangers when first meeting at the clinic.

In the corporate based programs many people come in already knowing each other, or, meeting co-workers who they may never have talked to before and then seeing these people throughout the day during the clinic and then for as long as both parties stay in employment of the company.

There is a real danger in the corporate setting of two phenomena's occurring. First, the buddy system that we talk often about here at Freedom--where if one buddy fails the other follow suits, because the two people start to feel contingent on one another. Sometimes this is even a bigger problem when the whole group is a big buddy system, and then numerous people could be lost all in one swoop.

The other phenomena though that can be a real danger in such systems is where one or two people are having a bad day, possibly having nothing to do with quitting smoking, and then start to spread the word of negative feelings that they are now experiencing some horrible effect from quitting smoking. Then as soon as something goes awry in another person from the group's day, again, likely having nothing to do with quitting smoking, and the person starts to feel angered or upset by the external situation, he or she now thinks too that his or her feelings are some quit smoking effect. Pretty soon the whole group is scared and their quits are now in jeopardy. This can happen in community groups too, but usually on a smaller scale for groups rarely form long lasting bonds and have regular contact with each other.

It is crucial that everyone who reads here understand that throughout their lives they are going to have bad days. This is not because they are ex-smokers, it is because they are human beings. It is even broader than that, it is because they are living organisms. Our environments will effect our moods. Be it weather problems, stresses with family members, problems at work, shifts in the economy, issues in the world that effect the peace and stability of nations, and a host of other problems that plague mankind, life continues after people quit smoking and it is imperative to recognize that you are going to have bad days as an ex-smoker. But you must recognize that you were going to have most of those same days if you were a current smoker and you would likely have had some of those same days if you had never been a smoker.

Also you should note that while many of these bad days would have been happening no matter what your past or current smoking status had been, by having quit smoking you are in fact averting a whole lot of really bad days that smoking would have induced. Examples would be the day you have a smoking induced stroke, or the day you have a heart attack, or the day that a routine x-ray shows a spot that turns out to be more than a technological glitch. These days, while bad in themselves are the start of a time period which may make your current problems seem small and totally insignificant in comparison.

Then there are the problems of the bad days when withdrawals are just a tad worse as a smoker, because the environments you are in are not allowing constant smoking. These days are happening a lot more often for people too as more and more cities, states and even whole countries are starting to implement smoking restrictions in more public places.

Then there are the bad days when smoking becomes a greater economic hardship, because the price per pack all of a sudden jumps significantly. Then there are the bad days when you burn some piece of clothing, furniture, or maybe your whole house down. That last one would be a particularly noteworthy bad day--especially if you had pets or family members in the house who did not get out.

Smoking does have the one advantage of pretty much insuring that you will have less bad days of life though. It does this by killing you earlier than you were really intending to go. Unfortunately, this also limits your number of good days too and it will normally leave your loved ones with a lot more bad days than they would normally have had if you did not smoke.

Freedom is a lot more like the corporate based clinics because we all have the opportunity to stay in touch and share experiences over the long-term. While this allows our members the ability to share experiences and help to reinforce each others resolve, it also carries the additional risk of the spreading of negative experiences and having it appear to be effects of having quit smoking. It is crucial for our members to be more discriminating that this. When you are having bad moments to be able to look around and surrounding circumstances and try to determine if other areas of your life may be responsible for certain physical or emotional reactions.

If you come to the conclusion that absolutely nothing is wrong in your life or in the lives of others around you that can be accounting for some bad feeling--congratulations are in order for you have reached a state of paradise and bliss that most of mankind has been seeking since its inception and has never been able to attain. Although if this is the case, there is a chance that you may have lost a little touch with reality.

Life goes on after you quit smoking--accept that fact. It is indeed what you were hoping for when first quitting--that your life would go on as it did before, maybe even better. While you may not be happy with the way everything is going in your life at any given moment, if you really examine the benefits to your health and to your life of no longer having to maintain an expensive, dirty, dangerous and deadly addiction, you will at least always be a little happier by the fact that you made and stuck to a commitment to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

February 16th, 2003, 7:38 am #29

It seems a number of people are experiencing what they think of as bad days. Everyone should work at keeping things in perspective. Life goes on without smoking and sometimes things will be bad that have nothing to do with smoking and or quitting.

But I think if everyone really considers the full implications of smoking, they will realize that that even bad days are better days than they would be if you were still a smoker. More significant, if you compare your bad days to people on oxygen for the rest of their lives because they are permanently pulmonary cripples, or people on chemotherapy trying to save their lives from cancer, or people in the end stages of smoking induced conditions that have no real effective treatments, they will realize that the bad days they are now having are a walk in the park compared to these patients bad days. In fact, your bad days are probably better than these people's good days.

If in doubt of this concept, go to www.whyquit.com and take a read of the ALA Wall of Remembrance or take a look at Bryan's story and see which of these people's life stories would you consider trading positions with.


Bryan's story

Trouble in relationships, job troubles, sleep disturbances, even depression, if compared to these tragic stories should help make you realize what you have gained by quitting as opposed to lamenting of the problems that you may perceive quitting has caused. In most cases quitting hasn't caused your problems, life has. Cigarettes won't resolve problems either, just add new ones to them that are usually more serious than the problem leading you to want a cigarette. Life goes on after quitting. In fact it will likely go on longer and you will go on significantly healthier as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
From: Joel. Sent: 2/7/2002 7:03 PM
For people who were experiencing a "bad day" yesterday. Life goes on without smoking and life will have its good days and bad days. Quitting smoking helps insure you will overall have more days, and because of better health you will be able to more fully enjoy the good days and even be better equipped mentally and physically to handle the bad days too.

Bad situations (death, illness, relationship problems, work troubles or job losses, bad economic times, etc.) will still occur and make for down times. But time helps all of us assimilate even the most tragic of circumstances and we bounce back to carry on with our lives. Even after the death of those closest to us, over time we can get back to happy and fulfilling lives.

Time does not improve smoking though. Smoking gets worse and worse over time, and your health deteriorates more and more over time. The kind of damage smoking can induce does not always lend itself to just bad days or bad moments in a day--it can lead to pain and discomfort that continues till death ends the chronic suffering.

Again, while it may sound cliché and flippant, any day you overcome every obstacle smoke free was a good day in that one respect. That one respect helped to extend your health and save your life. Take satisfaction in your accomplishment for that day. To feel the same satisfaction everyday, remember what a good job you did staying smoke free yesterday and vow today to recommit to never take another puff!

Joel


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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 7th, 2006, 8:10 pm #30

Today millions of never-smokers will have a bad day. The difference between them and a recovering nicotine addict is that thoughts about the absence or presence of nicotine as being part of the problem or solution will never once cross their mind. But take heart. Not only will this bad day pass but someday in the not to distant future you too will experience another bad day during which you'll never once think about smoking nicotine.
Celebrate your mind's physical, subconscious and conscious healing as you have left absolutely nothing of value behind! Look forward to any un-extinguished crave triggers as an opportunity to reclaim yet another aspect of life! Look at each conscious thought of wanting that enters your mind as a golden opportunity to set the record straight. Now that you are fully committed to never taking another puff the lying can end.
Truth be known, you are the envy of every addicted smoker you'll see today. They do not smoke nicotine to tease you. They do so because they must. For them, every day is lived inside a toxic cloud. Their addiction compels them to wear arsenic, cadmium, cyanide and a host of other toxins upon their face, hair, hands and clothing. Today they will each pay money to destroy a bit more of their body's ability to receive and transport life giving oxygen, to add to and build bigger a carcinogen bomb within, to further damage a totally innocent mind and body. You think you had a bad day? Imagine adding active nicotine dependency and the never endings struggle to keep pace with nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life to it.
Good or bad days our healing and freedom continues. No matter how bad any day feels you'll always have the pride and glory of having taken back your mind, health and life! No circumstance on planet earth can every compel you to put nicotine into your bloodstream again. Recovery and returning home is your loving gift to you. Hold it close and protect it above all else. Still just one guiding principle, one that will always remain our common bond ... just one day at a time Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew! Tomorrow will be better but certain aspects of this moment are already perfect! We're with in spirit.
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John (Gold x6)
Last edited by John (Gold) on April 12th, 2009, 5:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

July 10th, 2006, 10:41 am #31

From above:
Lest any of us forget.

We have three real world examples currently happening to board members that really show what kind of bad days smoking is capable of causing. The side effects that people may go through from quitting are nothing compared to the side effects that can be caused by not quitting. The three stories unfolding below clarify this point. No one should ever think that quitting is "A fate worse than death". The best way to mimimize your risk of facing real pain and suffering is to remember to stay totally committed to the promise that you made to yourself when joining to never take another puff!

Joel

Sadly, this one needs to be updated to include the following new string:

Loss of a Great Quitter

New addition to this repost:

The Real Cigarette Induced "Roller Coaster" Ride
Last edited by Joel on April 12th, 2009, 5:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joe J free
Joe J free

October 26th, 2009, 11:57 pm #32

Repeating Joel's earlier post in this string:

I haven't been able to spend a lot of time here the past few days. It seems a number of people are experiencing what they think of as bad days. Everyone should work at keeping things in perspective. Life goes on without smoking and sometimes things will be bad that have nothing to do with smoking and or quitting.

But I think if everyone really considers the full implications of smoking, they will realize that that even bad days are better days than they would be if you were still a smoker. More significant, if you compare your bad days to people on oxygen for the rest of their lives because they are permanently pulmonary cripples, or people on chemotherapy trying to save their lives from cancer, or people in the end stages of smoking induced conditions that have no real effective treatments, they will realize that the bad days they are now having are a walk in the park compared to these patients bad days. In fact, your bad days are probably better than these people's good days.

If in doubt of this concept, go to www.whyquit.com and take a read of the ALA Wall of Remembrance or take a look at Bryan's story and see which of these people's life stories would you consider trading positions with. Trouble in relationships, job troubles, sleep disturbances, even depression, if compared to these tragic stories should help make you realize what you have gained by quitting as opposed to lamenting of the problems that you may perceive quitting has caused. In most cases quitting hasn't caused your problems, life has. Cigarettes won't resolve problems either, just add new ones to them that are usually more serious than the problem leading you to want a cigarette. Life goes on after quitting. In fact it will likely go on longer and you will go on significantly healthier as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel


Does it sometimes look like a lot of our members seem to be having a bad day?

The Real Cigarette Induced "Roller Coaster" Ride
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Johnnie
Johnnie

August 26th, 2010, 3:27 pm #33

Another great thread to which I'll be returning. Later I'll add to my Quit Log this vow:

Stop today, stop right now, talking to a single soul about 'having a bad day' because of lack of nicotine. Instead, no matter what effort's required, be grateful for the miracle of nonsmoking freedom.
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Cassie1
Cassie1

July 22nd, 2012, 9:36 pm #34

Thank you for this article, I am starting my 7th day- nicotine free and I'm very glad to be here. Had "Bad Moments " in the day, when, I thought, does it ever really get better?  Then I read here and reminded my self- everyone here is NOT living in misery, it must get better, Breathe, and never take another puff..   I am grateful for tis site and messages.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

July 22nd, 2012, 11:14 pm #35

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