Replacing the Word "Cigarette" with "Nicotine"

Retraining the conscious mind
John (Gold)
John (Gold)

February 19th, 2002, 10:21 pm #11

Learning to take our quit just one day, hour and crave at a time is probably the most important skill taught here at Freedom. Yesterday is history and tomorrow beyond our reach! When we put our heads on our pillows tonight, if we've remained 100% nicotine clean today then victory is complete and we should each sleep as champions!

But as Joel says, if we look at this quit as only being successful if we remain quit for our entire life, then the only time we'll ever feel a sense of victory is after we've died. Celebrate your Freedom and healing today! No nicotine just one day at a time! Patience! The comfort is awesome! Join us!
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 1st, 2002, 6:52 pm #12

The day that smoking changed from being a matter of choice to a mandatory endless requirement was the point of no return. What may have started as a brief rebellious experiment, an attempt to look more adult, or as a means to gain acceptance from others, was now a true, full blown and permanent chemical dependency. Scientists tell us it was then that we each altered our brains and that even if we are able to quit , break free and grow 100%comfortable in our new life as an ex-smoker, that we each remain on probation for the remainder of our lives, always just one puff away from relapse.

Knowing the law of addiction doesn't make the comfort that arrives, for all who remain patient, any less comfortable. In fact it can be comforting knowing exactly what it takes to stay free! There are no loopholes in the law of addiction. Yes, the "thought" of "just one" is a lie! Like Joel teaches us, the true measure of the tremendous power of nicotine isn't in how hard it is to quit but in the power of that one little puff and how easy it is relapse!

Be patient with your healing, just one day at a time! There are over one billion comfortable ex-smokers on earth and none of them were stronger than you! It doesn't take strength to quit but simply desire and an appreciation for the power of smoking just one puff of new nicotine! There is only one rule that we each must follow in order to remain free for life -NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Quote
Share

DebD (GOLD)
DebD (GOLD)

April 2nd, 2002, 11:52 am #13

THANK YOU, JOHN!
I appreciate you pulling this up. It's been kind of a rough day today, missing my old "friend", which I hadn't since I started my quit 12 plus days ago. I've been telling myself to just make it through today and tomorrow will be better. Having seen it written in your message # 14 has helped, I just had to see someone else say it. Thanks! DebD 12 DAYS 9HRS 56 MIN, 248 NOT SMOKED,SAVING $48.41, LIFE SAVED 20hrs 49min.
Quote
Share

mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

May 31st, 2002, 3:07 pm #14

Seemed appropriate for today!
31ST MAY 2002
WORLD NO NICOTINE DAY!!
yqs mirigirl
another nicotine addict
free and healing
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 25th, 2002, 9:45 am #15



Together with the brain's right insula, our dopamine pathways are the mind's priorities teacher, pounding home the importance of species suvival events such as eating, drinking, reproduction, nurturing, group bonding and accomplishment. The problem is that by happenstance some external chemicals are able to take this brain circuitry hostage, some more than others. When it happens, the person is often left totally convinced that continuing use of the chemical is as important as eating. Food craves, nicotine craves. Food "aaah" sensations, nicotine "aaah" sensations. The enslaved mind becomes convinced that ending nicotine use will be akin to starving ourself to death. It isn't that the brain's pay-attention priority teaching circuitry isn't working exactly as designed. It did its job well. What went wrong was that the brain was fooled into activiting these pathways by arrival of an external chemical.

The beauty of the situation is that once the addict understands why stopping seems so frightening and hard that coming home can be one of the most amazing journeys they've ever made. Everything we did while under nicotine's influence can be done as well as or better as us! Why fear arriving at a day where we go the entire day and never once want to put nicotine into our body? It's a good thing, not bad. Isn't it time to stop being afraid. Embrace coming home, don't fight it!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 26th, 2009, 1:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 10th, 2002, 1:18 pm #16

Welcome to Freedom!

If you're new to Freedom and still a daily slave to nicotine, isn't it time to trade places and place your chemical dependency under arrest and behind bars! The key to the cell is the next puff of nicotine. Take it and you stay on that side of the bars. Don't take it and you're free for so long as you don't. Yes, you will have to go through that temporary chemical and psychological adjustment period called "quitting" but focus on the next few minutes and let an hour be your goal. Take the hours one at a time and let them serve and you focus and building blocks to glory! Celebrate that first hour! Celebrate the second hour! No crave lasts for more than three minutes so be sure and look at a clock. The next few minutes will always be doable and there is no place, event, emotion or circumstance on this planet that can force you to again smoke nicotine. Baby steps to glory! John : )
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 15th, 2003, 2:09 am #17

It's just a quick little exercise to maybe get you
thinking a bit more like a real drug addict instead
of focusing only upon the second word in the
plant's real name - nicotiana tabacum
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 26th, 2009, 1:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 2nd, 2003, 5:03 am #18

We don't smoke cigarettes any more than alcoholics drink bottles or heroin addicts inject needles. We're true chemical drug addicts and we smoke nicotine ... or, as indictated by the below story, may even stoop to drinking nicotine.

Florida Bar Concocts Nicotine Drink
Bar Markets Drink As Alternative To Smoking

POSTED: 3:22 p.m. EDT August 1, 2003


A new smoking ban in Florida may snuff out cigarettes in bars and restaurants -- but it's not cutting down on the appetite for nicotine.


In fact, as a result of the ban, a new cocktail was created: The Nicotini.


"When we first started out it was very, very strong," bar owner Larry Wald said.
It took a year of testing and tasting to create the concoction.


The Nicotini -- in regular and menthol -- was ready for routine consumption just as the smoking ban went into effect.


"We made an announcement, picked up all the ashtrays and said: 'Sorry there's no more smoking, but we have this.' And [we] bought everybody in the house a drink," Wald said.


The Nicotini is made by soaking tobacco leaves in vodka and then adding five different liqueurs to tame the tobacco flavor.


"You do get a nicotine buzz from this," an unnamed patron said.
But that "buzz" is what concerns some.


"It strikes me as potentially dangerous," lung specialist Dr. Glenn Singer said.
Singer's concern is that nicotine is a drug and, unlike over-the-counter patches and gum, there's no telling what dose you're getting in the Nicotini.


"When someone takes something like that, we don't know how it's going to react in that person," Singer said.


There are no laws against nicotine-infused cocktails, but Wald doubts anyone will overindulge.
"You're not going to drink 20 of these in a row because, obviously, you will get a stomach ache from the nicotine," Wald said.


And with smokers seeking an alternative to lighting up outside the bar, Wald hopes the Nicotini lets his customers know he cares.


"If you don't want to go outside to smoke a cigarette because you're having a good time, yes, I would stay inside for the drink," bar patron Steve Rosenberg said.

Copyright 2003 by
[url=mailto:balnews@theWBALchannel.com]TheWBALChannel.com[/url]. All rights reserved.
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 26th, 2009, 1:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

August 2nd, 2003, 8:01 am #19

That is nauseating. And very, very sad.
Sal
Six months, two weeks, six days of freedom from nicotine.
Quote
Like
Share

Ms MonaGolden1
Ms MonaGolden1

August 2nd, 2003, 8:10 am #20

When I heard this story on the news, I couldn't believe my ears... Then I thought about how fortunate I am to not listen to the junky voices anymore. The sad fact is, that if my nicotine addiction was still active, I might consider trying one of those "stupid concoctions".


I'm glad to be free and healing.



YQS (6M,4W),

Last edited by Ms MonaGolden1 on March 26th, 2009, 1:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

johnny L irish
johnny L irish

February 20th, 2004, 11:17 am #21

Cigarettes are also very efficient. From what I understand, each one delivers about 10 hits outside at the communal ashtray. Since I smoked 30 a day, I needed to feed myself 300 times. Of course, when I started out, I only needed to feed myself maybe 60 or 70 times a day. Incredibly efficient and cost [deth]-effective over time. Always more, more, more. I'm glad to be rid of them.

Johnny
5D 21h 16m nicotine-free
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

July 23rd, 2004, 11:18 pm #22



I wish it was just a nasty little habit


Recognizing needs
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on March 26th, 2009, 1:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

ChristyMay1977
ChristyMay1977

August 11th, 2005, 11:06 am #23

EWWWWW ~ How sick is that? ... I would like to think that I was ever THAT addicted as to drink my nicotine due to a smoking ban in bars... but sad fact is, that I more than likely was! GROSS
~*~ Grateful Every Single Day for my Freedom! ~*~
Kisses,
Christy xx
Breathing Easy Since April 11th 2005 ~ That's 121 days!
Quote
Share

forza d animo
forza d animo

February 13th, 2006, 11:31 pm #24

Be honest with yourself. That is why you are reading here and not at another forum.
The next time that you think to yourself , "I want a cigarette." Say it aloud instead, "I want some nicotine."
You may be surprised just how quickly it works to keep a passing thought from turning into a raving crave. Your focus will quickly return to what you have learned and keep you from pursuing some fantasy that only frustrates you.
Give it a try. It really works.

Joseph - 16 months
Quote
Share

Em B 12106
Em B 12106

February 15th, 2006, 6:28 am #25

Indeed it does, (almost) immediately... within seconds!

Em
Three weeks, two days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 34 seconds. 357 cigarettes not smoked, saving $75.70. Life saved: 1 day, 5 hours, 45 minutes.
Quote
Share

AngiBugQuits
AngiBugQuits

February 18th, 2006, 2:09 am #26


I will replace the word Cigarette with Nicotine for the rest of the day just to try it on for size....it may stick!

While I am at it, I will also replace the word Smoker with Addict.....


I am very happy that I am now a Recovering Addict winning the battle over my addiction to Nicotine!

NTAP!
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 6th, 2006, 5:09 am #27

From above - Message #48:

Be honest with yourself. That is why you are reading here and not at another forum.
The next time that you think to yourself , "I want a cigarette." Say it aloud instead, "I want some nicotine."
You may be surprised just how quickly it works to keep a passing thought from turning into a raving crave. Your focus will quickly return to what you have learned and keep you from pursuing some fantasy that only frustrates you.
Give it a try. It really works.

Joseph - 16 months
Quote
Like
Share

maura60
maura60

July 28th, 2006, 3:32 am #28

Tks John, that was a very good tip, it decontextualizes the white thing with a filter and we see it for what it is. Clever. Thanks again.
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 10th, 2006, 11:28 pm #29

An excellent example of how replacing the word cigarette with nicotine can hilight the truth of our addiction:

A different perspective ...
Hi, first let me in introduce myself. I have been [ a nicotine addict ] since I was 16, I am now 25 (almost 26). I started [ using nicotine ] casually with some friends after school, which by college turned into a [ full fledged addiction ]. Until a week ago I was [ using ] just about a pack a day. 20 Brand Name Not Important [ nicotine delivery devices ] a day, usually more on the weekend (being out drinking and [ bringing on premature withdrawal ]) In college all of my friends [were nicotine addicts], all my college friends [ are still nicotine addicts ]. Everything I did, everywhere I went I was [ using nicotine ]. I would always have [ nicotine delivery devices ] on me. I would [ administer a dose ] first thing in the morning and right before bed. If I had only 2 [ delivery devices ] left in my pack you bet I was on my way to the store to buy more so I would never be without them.

Well people have been on me for as long as I can remember to quit [ using nicotine ]. I always said, "Yeah, yeah I will quit when I am ready." I told myself I would stop [ using nicotine ] when I turned 18, when I was 22 as my new years resolution, and then when I graduated college. I never even tried to quit. I don't think I even made an effort.

Two weeks ago money was a bit tight so as I was sitting making a budget for the week I was trying to figure out how I was going to make ends meet with bills, food, gas, and [ nicotine ]. I looked at my budget and laughed at myself because I was budgeting in something that was killing me. I said to myself, "How the heck is it possible that I am 25, college educated and still doing something 20 times a day that is killing me slowly and here I sit trying to figure out a way to keep doing it?" So I decided I was going to quit. I bought another pack of [ nicotine delivery devices ] the next day and told myself that after that pack was done I would be done. I began to research and found this site and whyquit.com and I began reading. I learnt a lot and made my mind up that I could do it. So a week ago today @ 11:45pm I [ used nicotine for the last time ].

I must say the first days were ok. I wasn't crawling the walls or anything. I would wake up in the morning and crave [ nicotine ] but I would tell myself today we aren't [ using nicotine ]; we will deal with tomorrow when it gets here. Although the craving never really went away (sort of a fog over my head all day, I was thinking about [ nicotine ] almost every min. of everyday) I didn't [ use nicotine ]. I drank a lot of juice. But I guess most importantly I didn't [ use nicotine ] not even [ once ]! I told myself: get over it, you're not [ using nicotine ] so figure out something else to do!

Well day 6 came and the cravings came a bit stronger and now at day 7 I might be going out of my mind. I am very restless and crawling out of my skin. I smell [ the toxic residue of the combustion of 4000 + chemicals ] on my co-workers and am obsessing about it. I want [ to smell like that too ], I want [ nicotine ]! I know why I quit! I read and re-read my list but god I [ never knew what it meant to be addicted until now ]! Not a lot of stress in general right now but just a longing for [ relief from withdrawal ].

My big concern is tomorrow. I am going to an all day music festival with a friend of mine. I have been looking forward to this show for a long time now. I know we will be drinking a lot of the day and just hanging out seeing some really good sets. I love outdoor music fests and this will be a really good one. Although I always [ used nicotine ] at them. My buddy is a [ constantly in withdrawal ] and I know he will be [ burning a toxic waste dump ] next to me all day. On top of that with drinking tomorrow I am not sure if I [ understand my addiction well enough to deal with the challenge ].

I know this was a long post and if ya read the whole thing…hey thanks! I guess I am just sitting here typing all this out cause….well I just want [ to smoke nicotine for the rest of my life ]!

The message must have helped (along with others) as tihs post ended the thread this reply was lifted from.





This addiction is very real and very potent. You should take it very seriously.
Knowledge is your ally and a simple phrase will keep you free.
Never take another puff.

Joseph (forza-d-animo)
Gold
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on October 6th, 2011, 4:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Quote
Share

Sharry
Sharry

December 16th, 2006, 2:34 am #30

Whar an intersting thread - puts a whole different perspective on my ex addiction.

I now realise that my whole adult life has been blighted by the addiction called nicotine.

Now I fully understand why I began, some years ago, to hate the actual smoking bit - needed the nicotine - so had it by way of gum sometimes. Probably less harmful but always went back to the smoking form of delivery.

I am committed to stay quit - and will find it a lot easier with such wonderful insight such as yours - thank you - Sharry.
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 18th, 2006, 10:47 pm #31

Change your base of thinking to reflect the truth and view your addiction in an honest light.

Replace the word 'smoking' with 'service my addiction'
and the word 'cigarette' with 'nicotine'.

You will be surprised what a difference it makes to view things as they really are.

JoeJFree - 707 days by NTAP!
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 26th, 2007, 10:46 am #32

Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on March 26th, 2009, 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

June 27th, 2007, 5:47 am #33

Last edited by Joel on March 26th, 2009, 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

forza d animo
forza d animo

December 5th, 2007, 5:34 am #34

For Cindy,
If you are reading you will find this. I hope it helps.
Recovery is a process of learning to live without nicotine. At some point you must let go of the idea that there is any relief from what you are feeling in a cigarette. It is a process of healing and learning to deal with life without first having to pause for a dopamine explosion in your brain.

Have faith that we are telling the truth that it gets easier. We are sometimes guilty of creating a fit of anxiety by fixating on a cigarette because we are convinced that it will make it better. It is from what we learn about our addiction that we realize that relief can only truly come when we never take another puff.
Quote
Share

VICKIGOLD2006
VICKIGOLD2006

March 30th, 2008, 9:57 pm #35

This simple excercise of changing two words, dramatically changed my view of nicotine addiction....try it, what have you got to lose?

Vicki, free from nicotine for 1 year, 7 months and 27 days, because I NTAP!!
Last edited by VICKIGOLD2006 on November 24th, 2010, 10:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share