Recognizing Needs

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Aug 2002, 10:53 #11

Alyson thanks for pulling this up for me. This says it all. This is what happens to me at times. Thanks again.

David
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 3 Weeks 1 Day 21 Hours 56 Minutes 3 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 1058. Money saved: $207.42.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:09

20 Aug 2002, 23:39 #12

Dear Bob,

Thank you so much for this post. I came here today because I have been having craves/urges to smoke lately, and reading this really helped me to realize that I am under some stress, and that I always used to smoke when I was stressed. It also reminded me to take care of myself...you know...feed when hungry, drink when thirsty, etc...

Thanks so much.

JennyBoBenny
Bronze
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Aug 2002, 02:19 #13

Lynne -

Maybe the experiences related here will speak to where you're at today!

YQS,
Alyson
56+ days
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

22 Nov 2002, 06:13 #14

Hmph...can't believe I haven't read this one before. "Recognizing My Needs" has been a bit startling for me lately. I have ignored many of my natural yearnings for so very long. This past weekend I recognized one I had been avoiding for a while...the need to cry. I felt like I was saved from drowning when I started to sob, I hadn't done it like that for so long, right down from the bottom of my toes...used to smoke instead. It was just the deep down release that my body (and mind) had been begging for... and you know what? A stinky ole sickarette would have done nothing to make me feel any better. Turns out I just needed a good cry. Pheww....thanks agian OBob...you are doing so much good here.

Thank you.

Lotus
FEELING the Healing for 1 Month 4 Weeks 15 Hours 11 Minutes 25 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 1758. Money saved: $439.75.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:10

30 Mar 2003, 11:34 #15

This is so true! And just what I needed to read! (Thank you, Sal for linking it to one of your replies! )
It's strange to realize that as adults, we need to decipher our needs as if we were just starting out in this world!
I am becoming much more in tune to my physical needs that have been quelched all these years by nicotine feedings! And even though I've read the caffeine warning at least a few times, I still make that mistake now and then. (No wonder coffee and sicarettes go together ~ too much of one makes you want too much of the other!)
The continuing education here is so helpful! It makes never taking another puff alot easier!

~ Sandy Celebrating 1 week, 5 days, 19 hrs of Freedom!
217 not smoked, $43.58 not spent. Saving 18 hrs, 5 mins of my life!
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:38

28 May 2003, 13:41 #16

Dear Bob,

This one is right on the money!!!!!!!

Just wish this body of mine would stop having so many "hunger" craves and maybe a few more "exercise" craves!(lol).

Thanks, this was just when I needed it.

Kath

I have been quit for 1 Month, 2 Weeks, 5 Days, 5 hours and 40 minutes (49 days). I have saved $620.37 by not smoking 1,723 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days, 23 hours and 35 minutes of my life.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:38

29 May 2003, 06:38 #17

Very insightful post. Imagine how our bodies have been asking for all these things and we have just giving it nicotine instead. I have the same problem with drinking enough water, so now I have posted signs around the house. I am really trying to get in touch with my body. Now that I am out of the fog of nicotine and I realize how abusive I have been to it, I feel like I need to make up for it with vitamins and a little TLC.
Gemini
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:38

31 May 2003, 13:18 #18

Bob-Great info on the basic needs we forget we have as smokers, like nicotine was actually filling any need at all except our need to feel comfort for the next 30 minutes if we were lucky....
I didn't even realize how much of my discomfort was from my own lack of attention to my body and mind. I will be paying much closer attention in the future.. It's a light bulb moment for me, thanks so much!!!
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

14 Jun 2003, 04:38 #19

From Kere: "would you believe that I forgot that it was ok to cry?"


Would you believe that that's very common for the addict? It is...
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:08

10 Jul 2003, 12:49 #20

Thank you so much for this post. I really relate to this, yes I have answered every want with a puff. Do I really want to answer all my needs with a peice of candy? No, but it is not easy distinguishing what it is I need, want or feel.

I have been running in a panic for sometime now. Thankyou for this share!!!

Dee
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:12

06 Oct 2003, 00:56 #21

I really needed this today.....for some reason, I feel like "something's missing".... this puts it into perspective.

Miss C.

(Silver in less than 30 days)
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:38

28 Oct 2003, 05:05 #22

I know I'm responding to an old post, but this is soooo true. Sometimes I blame things on quitting smokng ... it's a craving, it's the nicotine trying to fool me. Well, after 20 years of fooling myself that nicotine was the solution to my problems, I'm not going to blame it for everything that goes wrong. I am responsible for my actions and my deeds. No more nicotene to blame.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

28 Oct 2003, 10:33 #23

Bob ~ what a great post. Thanks for linking it in one of your posts today. I haven't answered my everyday "needs" like a normal, drug-free person for most of my life. Gosh, it's tough learning to be a "grownup" when you're 57!! Ahhhh, the Journey of Freedom from Addiction! Love it, Love this site and all the great folks who hang out here!!

Candi - Free and Healing for Four Days, 22 Hours and 52 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 8 Hours, by avoiding the use of 99 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $12.88.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:47

21 Jan 2004, 14:51 #24

Bob,

I know it's months later, but I'm still a newbie and I was looking at other newbie's posts and this one was recommended and I became curious and whaddyaknow...

I really needed to read this now!

Not only for your beautifully written and accurate words.

But, because I'VE FORGOTTEN HOW TO CRY TOO.

And I see someone wrote that to you.

So important to realize what it IS we're craving in place of nicotine.

Nice to get another perspective here.

Thankx.

Blessings!

Clarity who is two weeks free of nico-drug and happy to be!
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:33

22 Jan 2004, 04:16 #25

Hi OBob,
I know this is an old post,but it still works today!Thanks! All that you said is so true. As long as I had my cigarettes I didn't really need anything else.
Or anything else just wasn't as good without a cigarette. Learning how to "be" without a smoke is quite interesting. I have been very tired ever since I quit which will be 3 weeks tomorrow. I thought I might be depressed, but emotionaly I'm doing okay. I think my body is just adjusting. Maybe I'm just learning how to live without a cigarette and it is taking a lot of energy.
Laurie
I have chosen not to smoke for 2 Weeks 6 Days 9 Hours 3 Minutes 43 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 652. Money saved: $81.51.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:38

22 Jan 2004, 08:44 #26

This thread is a great help. Learning to re-learn signals from the body - I've especially been a good one for not saying or really dealing with stressful situations. I would go and have a cigarette instead of talking something out or even taking the time to figure out how I really feel about something. And having a cigarette instead of eating or drinking, etc. is quite common. At 3-1/2 weeks quit I've been rather confused about how my body feels - I'm just learning how to recognize hunger from thirst from whatever but I didn't even recognize that this was a common problem that developed because of the addiction. Thanks!

TerryLynn
Reply
Like

Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

25 Jan 2004, 13:40 #27

Learn to investigate your body's craves. You feel something... DON'T assume it's a nicotine crave. Sure, they come now and then, but our body uses similar feelings to get us to fill the daily needs of life. Go through the list. Are you hungry, tired, thirsty, angry, restless, run down? Do you need to eat, sleep, drink, vent, exercise, rest? Your body and mind have real needs, and it has ways of asking for them. Learn to listen, and you'll find that they might not be asking for nicotine as often as you thought. Learn to answer the needs by fulfilling them, instead of replacing them with nicotine, and you'll find health benefits you might not have expected.
Reply
Like

Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

01 Feb 2004, 08:57 #28

"I've learned -- and this is the point -- when I get what I think is a crave to examine it. To ask myself, okay, I'm craving something... is it really nicotine? Have I eaten? Have I had enough water? Am I run down? Have I exercised in the past couple of days? As often as not, I find that I'm craving something I actually NEED, and not nicotine at all. I find this especially when I get any kind of physical type of crave. I know I'm WAY past withdrawal. But I feel this physical call... my body is demanding something, but it's not nicotine. "
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2004, 20:56 #29

Nicotine's two-hour half-life inside the human body was the basic clock that not only regulated the deadline for that next feeding but also which feedings we'd consider our "best."

Imagine sleeping through four nicotine half-lives (8 hours) and awaking the next morning with your nicotine level somewhere down around your socks. No wonder that morning fix was one of the "best." Although the clock could not be slowed, acid generating events such as stress, anxiety, alcohol and mega doses of vitamin C could accelerate the clock by more rapidly depleting the body's reserves of the alkaloid nicotine. Such events would more quickly transport us to the brink of onset of early withdrawal. No wonder we made such deep rooted yet false conclusions about nicotine's relationship to stress and alcohol. No wonder they were some of our "best!"

Living life on nicotine's clock totally ignored our body's own natural and healthy neurochemical timetables. As you've probably read here at Freedom, nicotine caused the brain to release stores of adrenaline and noradrenaline that prepared our body for the fight or flight survival mode. An amazing cascade of fight or flight neurochemicals would temporarily shut down all non-essential systems and functions, constrict extremity blood vessels to help control any bleeding during battle or escape, accelerate the heartbeat to pump a greater volumes of blood, stimulate the lungs to process more oxygen, would heighten the senses, and dump stored fats and sugars into the bloodstream to provide an instant source of energy. Question: Is that what our body really needed when life's moment begged for deep relaxation like just before climbing into bed to sleep?

Recovery can be a wonderful adventure in self discovery as we begin to appreciate that our body's own neurochemicals each had purpose and their flow had natural controls, controls that the chemical nicotine was able to completely bypass. Was it time for a nicotine induced dopamine "aaah" reward sensation upon learning the tragic news of the death of a close friend or loved one? Was it time to smoke a chemical that would diminish the flow of serotonin, a mood and critical anxiety busting neurochemical?

All that matter are the next few moments and each is entirely doable. The accomplishment induced dopamine "aaah" sensation resting just beyond that next challenge is not only yours to enjoy, it's "you," it's beautiful, and it's an honest message that this recovery is a keeper. You're coming home! There was always only one rule, no nicotine today!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John


Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Jul 2009, 02:25, edited 2 times in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:37

13 Apr 2004, 11:36 #30

THIS IS ABSOLUTELY ONE OF THE BEST POSTS

ARI
19 DAYS OF FREEDOM
Reply
Like

Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

16 Apr 2004, 09:37 #31

For our new quitters.
Life will get better and better as you adjust to being free from nicotine.
In any situation, always remember to never take another puff. The crave will end whether you feed it or not.
NOT works really well!
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:37

12 May 2004, 06:58 #32

this is one of the best posts! i was dehydrated all day and though i wanted a cig! oh... read read read ! amity
Reply
Like

Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

15 May 2004, 08:28 #33

Learn to investigate your body's craves. You feel something... DON'T assume it's a nicotine crave.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 11 Jul 2009, 03:00, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Jun 2004, 02:26 #34

"Learn to investigate your body's craves. You feel something... DON'T assume it's a nicotine crave. Sure, they come now and then, but our body uses similar feelings to get us to fill the daily needs of life. Go through the list. Are you hungry, tired, thirsty, angry, restless, run down? Do you need to eat, sleep, drink, vent, exercise, rest? Your body and mind have real needs, and it has ways of asking for them. Learn to listen, and you'll find that they might not be asking for nicotine as often as you thought. Learn to answer the needs by fulfilling them, instead of replacing them with nicotine, and you'll find health benefits you might not have expected."


What a smart OMan that OBob is!



Melissa

36 months
Last edited by Toast (GOLD ) on 11 Jul 2009, 03:01, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

30 Jun 2004, 23:41 #35

This is by far one of the best analytical articles about craving. However, while I do realize that we have to examine our craves, I find it very difficult to satisfy that crave; albeit not for nicotine. For example, I used to sit in my back yard and smoke when I relax. I am unable at this time to sit in my back yard any more, because it triggers a crave - whatever that crave may be. I am now virtually unable to relax at all. So I keep myself busy by working during the time that I used to relax, smoke and even ponder over matters in my life. I am certainly unable to do that now. I simply cannot relax. I am able to work and function, jog and walk, but I am unable to relax. Therefore, recognizing what the crave really is, is one thing, and satisfying that newly discovered crave, is yet another. If you have any ideas, please help. I truly need to sit, relax and ponder. Is that possible now? I don't know. All I can hope for is that one day, out in the future, I may re-learn to relax.

Aida
Two weeks, two days free and healing.
Reply
Like