Reading and Growth

quitforgood
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:15

10 Jun 2006, 00:42 #41

Joe thanks for bringing this up. It amazes me that everytime I come to this site there is something posted that is just what I needed to read. Brenda 20 days nicotine free.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Sep 2006, 20:56 #42

We now have our fragile dream of becoming a comfortable x-smoker in control of our addiction. One who is able to live their life to the fullest, each and every day, without the daily feedings along with the false sense of security created within their own mind. How does that get accomplished? Answer is, we do it by living our lives one day at a time and following some basic principles. For sake of space I am just going to touch on one broad and basic concept. This is probably the most given advice at Freedom aside from Joel's concept and truth of "Never Take Another Puff." From the moment you become aware of Freedom or Why Quit you are advised to do the following.
READ, READ, READ & READ SOME MORE
There is a reason for that. Aside from the truth will set you free or knowledge is power, it works! Our psychological addiction needs to grow well beyond the subsiding demand of our physiological addiction to nicotine, as well as the physical characteristics and habits we developed and honed need to be forgotten. Our physical withdrawal symptoms subside rather quickly and our physical mannerisms more or less disperse on their own. Our physiological healing naturally continues on its own. What this leaves is the balance of growth. To balance out our journey of healing we need to make the effort to heal our own psychological damage. We need to change our way of thinking to mirror our new way of life. This aspect of healing may need a more direct effort by you to help initiate this change and then follow through with needed reinforcement. All you need to do is begin the process of reconditioning your way of thinking. This is done by living your life on a day to day basis along with continued education through reading. Develop the belief you will achieve the comfort you desire by visually seeing yourself as a comfortable x-smoker. If you don't believe or want to become comfortable it may take a long time of struggle and anguish to get there.
(from Roger's initial post)
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Parker GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Mar 2007, 08:46 #43

ImageFor all our newer members....

Read. Read. Read. The time you put into reading now will pay off during any tough moments that arise. During the early days of quitting, it simply is not possible to read too much.
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Martin32709
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Mar 2007, 10:51 #44

Hi All,

I have got to say that I feel great. I finally quit on the 12th of November 06, I can honestly say that time has flown since, it seems ages since my last post approx 3mths 8days ago.

I have noticed Joel and the team have uploaded new material in between that time,especially more detailed video lessons/segments which I think are worth thier weight in Gold.

I have spent most of my evening going through the site and refreshing to myself all the wonderful information on offer, this is really the key in my view to reinforcing the NTAP atittude.

Thanks to Joel and his Team for this wonderful site and SupportImage


Free and Healing for Approx 4mths nearly 14 days,


Take Care Everyone and just remember to NTAP,


Martin
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forza d animo
Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

16 Apr 2007, 06:26 #45

From Roger's original post:

"Our psychological addiction needs to grow well beyond the subsiding demand of our physiological addiction to nicotine, as well as the physical characteristics and habits we developed and honed need to be forgotten. Our physical withdrawal symptoms subside rather quickly and our physical mannerisms more or less disperse on their own. Our physiological healing naturally continues on its own. What this leaves is the balance of growth. To balance out our journey of healing we need to make the effort to heal our own psychological damage. We need to change our way of thinking to mirror our new way of life. This aspect of healing may need a more direct effort by you to help initiate this change and then follow through with needed reinforcement. All you need to do is begin the process of reconditioning your way of thinking. This is done by living your life on a day to day basis along with continued education through reading. Develop the belief you will achieve the comfort you desire by visually seeing yourself as a comfortable x-smoker. If you don't believe or want to become comfortable it may take a long time of struggle and anguish to get there."


On any given day, whether we are free for one day or 1000 days, we can create a craving from a thought. We only have to caress the thought and to nurture it. Often we wonder, "Why now?", and do not see that we reacted to the thought in such a manner that encouraged it to persist and to grow. How do I know that this is true?

My name is Joseph. I am a nicotine addict
Recovering for 2 years 6 months.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Jul 2007, 23:05 #46

From Roger's initial post:
.......This false image we spent years creating come to be possibly the hardest aspect of our addiction we may struggle to control upon making that decision to quit. The struggle within to shed that identity become a daily process along our journey. Unlike the physical withdrawal from nicotine that has a relative shorter life span or the physiological healing taking place naturally within our framework, our psychological healing may be for many the biggest and most difficult challenge to master.
Is there a set answer or method to overcoming this? I don't know that for sure but I will offer my view point based on my own observations and discoveries of my journey. First of all, take a moment to think how a champion figure skater or athlete of any kind makes their way to the top of their game. It is accomplished on a day to day basis practicing what ever they do, as well as mental visualizations of what they wish to become.
They don't sit around and expect to achieve without any effort. They understand to be come successful at what they desire, they have to work for it. There are no shortcuts to success! Our quits are much the same. To achieve the comfort we desire, an honest effort must take place.
The Comfort of Freedom From Tobacco & Nicotine Dependency
await all who
Read, Believe, Achieve & Never Take Another Puff!
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libby111605
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

27 Jul 2007, 23:30 #47

Thanks Joe, for bringing up this wonderful post and thanks Roger, for
writing it. I agree completely. Reading here has ALWAYS left me feeling
stronger and more inspired.
Libby - proud and grateful to be free for 1 year, 8 months
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Dec 2007, 06:34 #48

"We need to change our way of thinking to mirror our new way of life. This aspect of healing may need a more direct effort by you to help initiate this change and then follow through with needed reinforcement. All you need to do is begin the process of reconditioning your way of thinking. This is done by living your life on a day to day basis along with continued education through reading. Develop the belief you will achieve the comfort you desire by visually seeing yourself as a comfortable x-smoker."

- Roger

You Can if YOU Think You CAN!
Never Take Another Puff and Freedom it Will Be. Image
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Parker GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

24 Mar 2008, 21:46 #49

For anyone having a tough time I guarantee reading will help! There is nothing you might be feeling that other folks haven't also experienced. It helps to know that you are not unique in sometimes thinking about reactivating your addiction. We've all been there. However, reading will help provide the tools you need to face those thoughts and hold tight to your quit.

You can get through anything without nicotine. Nicotine will not make any situation in your life better, nor lessen any pain.

Nourish your quit. Treasure it. Comfort will come.

ImageParker - 5+ years
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starbirder.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Jul 2008, 07:20 #50

"For most of us that dark path we traveled called addiction began as children longing for acceptance and maturity or just being plain defiant." Roger
It is never to late to STOP and become EDUCATED!!!
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