Reading and Growth

TiffQuit
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

20 Apr 2005, 04:05 #31

Read.... Read.... Read....
Joel's Library [/size]
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Parker GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

02 Jun 2005, 08:29 #32

ImageFor all our newer members....

Read. Read. Read. The time you put into reading now will pay off during any tough moments that arise. During the early days of quitting, it simply is not possible to read too much.
Joel's Library [/size]
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

16 Jun 2005, 01:28 #33

ImageFor all our newer members....

Read. Read. Read. The time you put into reading now will pay off during any tough moments that arise. During the early days of quitting, it simply is not possible to read too much.
Joel's Library [/size]
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Dec 2005, 03:08 #34

Read.... Read.... Read....
Joel's Library [/size]
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jan 2006, 12:15 #35

Free Quit Smoking Books,
Guides and Tips
 
  • "Never Take Another Puff" - a 149 page .PDF quit smoking book by Joel Spitzer of Chicago, the Internet's leading authority on nicotine dependency recovery. Joel's free book is a wonderful collection 98 short quitting articles on almost every cessation topic imaginable.
  • "Nicotine Dependency Recovery" - an 8 page motivation and tips booklet in pdf format designed to move smokers from precontemplation to a quit attempt. It is intended for printing and distribution by physicians, hospitals, other health care providers, and by government, civic and other non-profit groups who are invited to add their name and logo to the cover.
  • PDF format (2.1 MB) | Word format (600KB 
  • "Freedom from Nicotine" - a 60 page quitting booklet in Word format.
  • "Joel's Library" - the online HTML version of Joel Spitzer's "Never Take Another Puff."
  • "Quit Smoking Tip Sheet" - an HTML version of Joel's top 18 quitting tips."
Last edited by John (Gold) on 20 Dec 2013, 14:39, edited 2 times in total.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

12 Jan 2006, 07:04 #36

ImageFor all our newer members....

Read. Read. Read. The time you put into reading now will pay off during any tough moments that arise. During the early days of quitting, it simply is not possible to read too much.
Joel's Library [/size]
Reply

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

20 Jan 2006, 00:49 #37

Read.... Read.... Read....
Joel's Library [/size]
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Feb 2006, 21:32 #38

Our psychological addiction needs to grow well beyond the subsiding demand of our physiological addiction to nicotine, as well as the physical characteristics and habits we developed and honed need to be forgotten. Our physical withdrawal symptoms subside rather quickly and our physical mannerisms more or less disperse on their own. Our physiological healing naturally continues on its own. What this leaves is the balance of growth. To balance out our journey of healing we need to make the effort to heal our own psychological damage. We need to change our way of thinking to mirror our new way of life. This aspect of healing may need a more direct effort by you to help initiate this change and then follow through with needed reinforcement. All you need to do is begin the process of reconditioning your way of thinking. This is done by living your life on a day to day basis along with continued education through reading. Develop the belief you will achieve the comfort you desire by visually seeing yourself as a comfortable x-smoker.

You Can if YOU Think You CAN! Never Take Another Puff and Freedom it Will Be.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Apr 2006, 23:33 #39

.......This false image we spent years creating come to be possibly the hardest aspect of our addiction we may struggle to control upon making that decision to quit. The struggle within to shed that identity become a daily process along our journey. Unlike the physical withdrawal from nicotine that has a relative shorter life span or the physiological healing taking place naturally within our framework, our psychological healing may be for many the biggest and most difficult challenge to master.
Is there a set answer or method to overcoming this? I don't know that for sure but I will offer my view point based on my own observations and discoveries of my journey. First of all, take a moment to think how a champion figure skater or athlete of any kind makes their way to the top of their game. It is accomplished on a day to day basis practicing what ever they do, as well as mental visualizations of what they wish to become.
They don't sit around and expect to achieve without any effort. They understand to be come successful at what they desire, they have to work for it. There are no shortcuts to success! Our quits are much the same. To achieve the comfort we desire, an honest effort must take place.
The Comfort of Freedom From Tobacco & Nicotine Dependency
await all who
Read, Believe, Achieve & Never Take Another Puff!
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jun 2006, 22:20 #40

"We need to change our way of thinking to mirror our new way of life. This aspect of healing may need a more direct effort by you to help initiate this change and then follow through with needed reinforcement. All you need to do is begin the process of reconditioning your way of thinking. This is done by living your life on a day to day basis along with continued education through reading. Develop the belief you will achieve the comfort you desire by visually seeing yourself as a comfortable x-smoker." - Roger
You Can if YOU Think You CAN! Never Take Another Puff and Freedom it Will Be.
Image
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