Quitting With A Positive Attitude

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 29th, 2006, 6:42 pm #26

Homecoming

Once we stop being afraid long enough to realize that we've left absolutely nothing of value behind, that the real quitting took place on the day nicotine took command of our life, that each and every one of the neurochemicals nicotine controlled already belonged to us, that recovery is a journey in healing where we pick up the pieces of a mind and life once saturated by nicotine, the radiance and gradually emerging beauty of a long suppressed sense of normal can fully bask in truth's light.


Flavor, taste? There are no tastebuds inside human lungs. Like, love? Every two hours the amount of nicotine remaining in our bloodstream declined by half. Yes, the longer the nicotine addict was deprived and the lower blood serum nicotine levels became, the more its arrival deepened dependency's bonds. As Joel says, it isn't that we liked smoking but that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke.


Stress busting, a calming effect? To the contrary. Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant. We had long forgotten what true relaxaton was like. Nicotine never once solved any stressful event other than its own absense. The stress of our car getting a flat tire elevated acid levels throughout our body's fluids thus instantly neutralizing reserves of the alkaloid nicotine. We reached for nicotine instead of the jack because the stresses threw us into early withdrawal.


Once we finished servicing our addiction the underlying stressful event was untouched. We still had a tire to change. Being a nicotine addict was hard work as we added the onset of early withdrawal to every stressful acid producing event life threw our way.


That next challenge reflects an opportunity to either extinguish another conditioned trigger or correct another lie. The lie of "just one"? For the drug addict, "one is too many and a thousand never enough." Relish picking up the pieces, as when the finished the re-assembled life is a clean, healthy and glorious place to live, breathe and love.


Still just one rule. No nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew! Delight in this journey home. Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!


Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,


John (Gold x7)
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 7th, 2009, 5:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

July 7th, 2006, 6:23 am #27

From: Joel. Sent: 1/12/2003 5:07 PM
Hello Roger:

I actually have an attitude quote I sometimes use in clinics. It is that if you quit with a lousy attitude you are pretty much assured to have a lousy time when first quitting.

If on the other hand you quit with a good attitude, well, you may still have a lousy time in the beginning, but at least you will have a good attitude about it.

As you may have guessed, this insight doesn't help a whole lot in the first few days. But it usually gets a chuckle. The more important advice on this issue is the string Acknowledge the negative--but dwell on the positive. Thanks for your sharing of insights here.

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 30th, 2006, 2:54 am #28

Seems a good day to bump this one to the top of the board.

You will succeed if you believe you can and commit to doing what it takes to gain the reward you desire..

Yes, even true for all of us who for so long didn't quit because we were led to believe we couldn't.

To be free From nicotine you must stay free of nicotine. NTAP!

One = All........ Zero = Freedom!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 21st, 2006, 9:32 am #29

Today you are victorious! Be Proud.

From Roger's original post above:
I don't need nicotine too keep on living. I don't need to smoke to feel alive.
What I am feeling is my body and mind healing from years of substance abuse.
This is a temporary feeling and will pass.
I can and will live without nicotine.
I do not need this drug to survive nor do I want to administer this drug to my system anymore.
I am happy I quit despite how I feel at the present.
The benefits from quitting far outweigh the symptoms during my temporary adjustment period.
This will get much better as promised by the ones who traveled this journey before me. I have faith in that.
Minute by minute or hour by hour you will you get through it and the day will finally end. Breathe a deep breath of nicotine free oxygen. A warm sensation may come over you. You reflect on your first day and fully understand the power of this chemical and its addictive qualities that has kept its grip on you for so many years. Today you won the battle. Again, make sure you place a huge smile on your face. Tell yourself how proud you are of you today. Pat yourself hard on your back for succeeding this day. You well deserve it.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 6th, 2006, 12:14 pm #30

"There Is Nothing Either Good Or Bad, Hard Or Easy,
It's How We Choose To Think That Makes It So"
~William Shakespeare~
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 26th, 2006, 12:06 am #31

From Roger's original post above:
I don't need nicotine too keep on living. I don't need to smoke to feel alive.
What I am feeling is my body and mind healing from years of substance abuse.
This is a temporary feeling and will pass.
I can and will live without nicotine.
I do not need this drug to survive nor do I want to administer this drug to my system anymore.
I am happy I quit despite how I feel at the present.
The benefits from quitting far outweigh the symptoms during my temporary adjustment period.
This will get much better as promised by the ones who traveled this journey before me. I have faith in that.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 8th, 2006, 4:47 am #32

There comes a time in every nicotine dependency recovery experience where we have to decide it is time to quit quitting and start looking ahead to living as a person finally free of their dependency.


If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 22nd, 2006, 8:18 pm #33

In closing Roger wrote:

Here is another a very good point to consider for those of you already working on a quit. If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 1st, 2007, 7:45 am #34

To Commemorate Roger's Fifth Gold.
Thanks Roger!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on March 7th, 2009, 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 4th, 2007, 1:01 pm #35

From: Roger (Gold) (Original Message) Sent: 1/12/2003 1:54 AM
"There Is Nothing Either Good Or Bad, Hard Or Easy,
It's How We Choose To Think That Makes It So"
~William Shakespeare~
When you read the above quote, think about the first thought that came to your mind. Was it one that made a contradictive statement or one that opened up your mind for potential provocative thinking and acceptance of this universal law?
Throughout history it has been universally understood how we picture things that we like or dislike or how we perceive ourselves handling them, is most likely how they will turn out. Why do you suppose that is? Most experts would suggest we have already predetermined that within our subconscious mind by our fears and trepidations. By entering a preconceived thought in our subconscious, we unknowingly set the tone or program our subconscious as to how a particular task is handled by us. There are many things we cannot change the end result of. We can however control our actions and reactions, leading to a more pleasant or difficult result based on our attitude and perception as to how we handle the task.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 17th, 2007, 7:42 pm #36

There comes a time in every nicotine dependency recovery experience where we have to decide it is time to quit quitting and start looking ahead to living as a person finally free of their dependency.


If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: June 17th, 2006, 7:00 am

September 2nd, 2007, 1:52 pm #37

You're not giving up nicotine, you're getting rid of it.......
Don't say good bye to nicotine but say good riddance to it instead ......
Think of nicotine cessation as an impossibly high mountain to climb......and it may well become one.
Use the incredible power of the human brain to give positive shape and form to your psychological reconditioning.
Think of it as a homecoming and a liberation and it will be just that.
Last edited by RobinS614 on March 7th, 2009, 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 16th, 2007, 1:26 pm #38

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing,
you're right."
"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."
"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking. "
"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal. "
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "
~Henry Ford~
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 1st, 2008, 5:18 am #39

Congratulatons on Six
&
thanks again Roger!
(so....was it the 31st or the 1st that you put down that honey dipping shovel? Good decision no doubt. )
YQb - Joe J
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on March 7th, 2009, 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 28th, 2008, 1:25 pm #40

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing,
you're right."

"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."

"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
"

"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.
"

"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs.
"
Focus on Quitting for One hour at a time


All of the above phrases in black are quotes of
~Henry Ford~
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on May 2nd, 2010, 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

September 29th, 2008, 7:29 am #41

"Weather You Believe You Can Do A Particular Task, Or Weather You Believe You Can't, You Are Absolutely Right Either Way You Think"
~Henry Ford~
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "
Focus on Quitting for One hour at a time

Last edited by johnnynonic on May 2nd, 2010, 3:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 8th, 2008, 5:55 am #42

From above:

From: Joel. Sent: 1/12/2003 5:07 PM
Hello Roger:

I actually have an attitude quote I sometimes use in clinics. It is that if you quit with a lousy attitude you are pretty much assured to have a lousy time when first quitting.

If on the other hand you quit with a good attitude, well, you may still have a lousy time in the beginning, but at least you will have a good attitude about it.

As you may have guessed, this insight doesn't help a whole lot in the first few days. But it usually gets a chuckle. The more important advice on this issue is the string Acknowledge the negative--but dwell on the positive. Thanks for your sharing of insights here.

Joel
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Joined: August 6th, 2009, 8:19 pm

August 28th, 2009, 7:17 pm #43

Excellent reading for me today - thank you!
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Joined: January 18th, 2009, 6:57 am

August 28th, 2009, 7:42 pm #44

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right."
"I can't quit" ... or ... "I won't quit"?

"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."

"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
"
"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal. "
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "


All of the above phrases in black are quotes of
~Henry Ford~
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Joined: May 20th, 2009, 6:43 pm

August 29th, 2009, 12:17 am #45

I have read these links here before but I am so glad to see them again. Being an ex-smoker is such a wonderful journey privileged to read these sites and respond to them.
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Joined: January 18th, 2009, 6:57 am

October 6th, 2010, 12:05 pm #46

Copying one of Roger's previous posts:

As a long time active nicotine addict of over 35 years, I initially did not see my quitting process as a positive experience. Based on all my previous failures trying to gain control over my addcition, I would automatically conjure up, within my mind, all the negative images stored there from previous quit attempts. After each failure, I feared them more and more. They appeared to grow in size and just kept getting larger. Those fears coupled with negative thoughts and images had more control over me than my addiction to nicotine did. The reason for this is very simple. I failed to,
When I reached the 24 hour mark without any nicotine entering my body for the first time in over 35 years, I finally was able to see beyond the dark cloud of addiction that wrapped my brain for so long. I caught a fleeting glimpse of a silver lining that resided beyond active addiction. It was then I understood my journey for what it really was. A positive outcome for a negative situation.
If your thoughts are mostly negative regarding what and how you feel, you can turn the tables on them by developing a positive outlook towards your quit. Change the way you think and you will change your life.
This can be done the same way you quit.
One Day At A Time.
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Joined: September 13th, 2010, 5:47 pm

October 11th, 2010, 5:24 pm #47

Greetings,
 I read the posts from 2003 to now in 2010. It is a timeless story and I appreciate it as I do the many others. A few thoughts.... I went through a lot of emotional growth the past year. When I quit smoking I also learned that REAL emotions and facing them was my biggest lesson yet to be learned. I did not know at the time but the reward was as huge as the physical rewards of being an ex. I had to adjust my attitude hourly at times and learning to do so has brought me to a me that I really like. Just as you "un-learn" a user's habits, you can replace them with positive thoughts and actions. Do not underestimate the value of incorporating this into your new life as an ex.

  If I was not dwelling in this skin I would not recognize myself. There seems to be a recognizable likeness, from somewhere long ago but still better, happier and more in control than the me I have known in decades. Things that were dark, deceiving and controlling seem to have been extracted from my inner self and the basic truths left in their place. These truths are few but prominent, clear and comforting placed squarely in the center of my being. These truths consist of the following:
~Life's journey-I have no place to hide nor do I want to. I do not fear it and can readily adjust to whatever it brings me with grace and without a drug. (FFN taught me to live without a crutch or addiction)
~Health-I must face whatever disease I may encounter as everyone else before me has. I choose what I fuel and pollute my body with. I can choose good everytime, I control my body, it does not control me. (FFN taught me to accept what I cannot change and to VALUE my health even more, for me, my family and in honor of those who lost their fight)
~Love - it is the greatest gift and I have the power to give it to anyone I choose. Sometimes it saves others. And it is felt most when being given, not received. (FFN shows love for the addicted by being here, supporting us and showing us how to give back)
~Knowledge - I know that the important things in life cannot be bought, they must be felt, given, lived, shared and cherished. (FFN has given me the keys to living my life the way it was intended and probably  a lot more of it!)
  These are the things that drive me. Not an addiction. Not a habit, not a lie. You see, attitude is integral to recovery and healing, choose yours and watch it grow....
Thank you freedom folks for helping me get here.
Terri
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