Quitting With A Positive Attitude

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:44

15 Apr 2005, 02:30 #21

I just read yor post and I think it's a beautiful poem. I was reading it loudly and made an excellent rap-like song out of it! Come on everybody! Let's all sing together:
NEVER take another puff and freedom it will be.
Lena
9 days smoke-free
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 May 2005, 01:45 #22

From Post # 8 above:

Thanks for the read Roger : ) Love that Ford quote! Before we dove into these hundreds of other cessation issues and before I received that first email for a guy named Joel, I was a one issue type guy - attitude, attitude, attitude! Back then I even believed it could not only overcome my own ignorance of the law of addiction but that it was the most important thing of all in quitting. But then how could I believe in something that I had never really known - the law of addiction? It's amazing the way ignorance works! It truly is bliss and can also deadly as relapse was the rule of the day before Joel arrived carrying the big picture.

Like you, I still deeply believe that we are what we think! Put that together with a detailed understanding of the law of addiction, and a bit of reinforcement now and then and I think it's highly likely that I'll Never Take Another Puff! Thanks Roger!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, John : )
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Aug 2005, 20:35 #23

From: Joel. Sent: 1/12/2003 5:07 PM
Hello Roger:

I actually have an attitude quote I sometimes use in clinics. It is that if you quit with a lousy attitude you are pretty much assured to have a lousy time when first quitting.

If on the other hand you quit with a good attitude, well, you may still have a lousy time in the beginning, but at least you will have a good attitude about it.

As you may have guessed, this insight doesn't help a whole lot in the first few days. But it usually gets a chuckle. The more important advice on this issue is the string Acknowledge the negative--but dwell on the positive. Thanks for your sharing of insights here.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Apr 2006, 23:15 #24

For Kevin -

There comes a time in every nicotine dependency recovery experience where we have to decide it is time to quit quitting and start looking ahead to living as a person finally free of their dependency.


If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Apr 2006, 05:03 #25

I believe you quit thinking you are wanting a cigarette when you realize it was nicotine, not smoke, that you needed. I believe you quit wanting ciugarettes when you decide you don't wnat any more of them.

I printed the following poem from John in a large colorful font and put it on our fridge at home so I would be sure to read it first thing every day. I did so for at least the first three months of this journey back to me. - JoeJ

If you are TRYING to quit smoking then you're still undecided.
Tell yourself quitting is HARD and unless you're lying it will be.
Believe your craves to be INTENSE and intense will be the ride.
Ponder excuses for a FIX and you'll eventually get to use them.
If you think you might RELAPSE, then relapse you just might.
If you believe that you will FAIL, then chances are you will.
If you WANT to be a ex-smoker, your mind has yet to heal.
When you're READY for your freedom, freedom you shall find.
View this challenge as WONDERFUL and fulfillment will arrive.
See the GLORY of today, then glory it will be!
Praise the HEALING of your body and set your spirit free.
Inhale the JOYS of today, feel the splendor of the journey.
Yet be TRUTHFUL of the past, to protect the here and now.
BELIEVE yourself an ex-smoker, an ex-smoker you shall see.
NEVER take another puff and freedom it will be.
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long John (GOLD x 6)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 May 2006, 18:42 #26

Homecoming

Once we stop being afraid long enough to realize that we've left absolutely nothing of value behind, that the real quitting took place on the day nicotine took command of our life, that each and every one of the neurochemicals nicotine controlled already belonged to us, that recovery is a journey in healing where we pick up the pieces of a mind and life once saturated by nicotine, the radiance and gradually emerging beauty of a long suppressed sense of normal can fully bask in truth's light.


Flavor, taste? There are no tastebuds inside human lungs. Like, love? Every two hours the amount of nicotine remaining in our bloodstream declined by half. Yes, the longer the nicotine addict was deprived and the lower blood serum nicotine levels became, the more its arrival deepened dependency's bonds. As Joel says, it isn't that we liked smoking but that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke.


Stress busting, a calming effect? To the contrary. Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant. We had long forgotten what true relaxaton was like. Nicotine never once solved any stressful event other than its own absense. The stress of our car getting a flat tire elevated acid levels throughout our body's fluids thus instantly neutralizing reserves of the alkaloid nicotine. We reached for nicotine instead of the jack because the stresses threw us into early withdrawal.


Once we finished servicing our addiction the underlying stressful event was untouched. We still had a tire to change. Being a nicotine addict was hard work as we added the onset of early withdrawal to every stressful acid producing event life threw our way.


That next challenge reflects an opportunity to either extinguish another conditioned trigger or correct another lie. The lie of "just one"? For the drug addict, "one is too many and a thousand never enough." Relish picking up the pieces, as when the finished the re-assembled life is a clean, healthy and glorious place to live, breathe and love.


Still just one rule. No nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew! Delight in this journey home. Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!


Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,


John (Gold x7)
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 17:45, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jul 2006, 06:23 #27

From: Joel. Sent: 1/12/2003 5:07 PM
Hello Roger:

I actually have an attitude quote I sometimes use in clinics. It is that if you quit with a lousy attitude you are pretty much assured to have a lousy time when first quitting.

If on the other hand you quit with a good attitude, well, you may still have a lousy time in the beginning, but at least you will have a good attitude about it.

As you may have guessed, this insight doesn't help a whole lot in the first few days. But it usually gets a chuckle. The more important advice on this issue is the string Acknowledge the negative--but dwell on the positive. Thanks for your sharing of insights here.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Sep 2006, 02:54 #28

Seems a good day to bump this one to the top of the board.

You will succeed if you believe you can and commit to doing what it takes to gain the reward you desire..

Yes, even true for all of us who for so long didn't quit because we were led to believe we couldn't.

To be free From nicotine you must stay free of nicotine. NTAP!

One = All........ Zero = Freedom!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Oct 2006, 09:32 #29

Today you are victorious! Be Proud.

From Roger's original post above:
I don't need nicotine too keep on living. I don't need to smoke to feel alive.
What I am feeling is my body and mind healing from years of substance abuse.
This is a temporary feeling and will pass.
I can and will live without nicotine.
I do not need this drug to survive nor do I want to administer this drug to my system anymore.
I am happy I quit despite how I feel at the present.
The benefits from quitting far outweigh the symptoms during my temporary adjustment period.
This will get much better as promised by the ones who traveled this journey before me. I have faith in that.
Minute by minute or hour by hour you will you get through it and the day will finally end. Breathe a deep breath of nicotine free oxygen. A warm sensation may come over you. You reflect on your first day and fully understand the power of this chemical and its addictive qualities that has kept its grip on you for so many years. Today you won the battle. Again, make sure you place a huge smile on your face. Tell yourself how proud you are of you today. Pat yourself hard on your back for succeeding this day. You well deserve it.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Nov 2006, 12:14 #30

"There Is Nothing Either Good Or Bad, Hard Or Easy,
It's How We Choose To Think That Makes It So"
~William Shakespeare~
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Nov 2006, 00:06 #31

From Roger's original post above:
I don't need nicotine too keep on living. I don't need to smoke to feel alive.
What I am feeling is my body and mind healing from years of substance abuse.
This is a temporary feeling and will pass.
I can and will live without nicotine.
I do not need this drug to survive nor do I want to administer this drug to my system anymore.
I am happy I quit despite how I feel at the present.
The benefits from quitting far outweigh the symptoms during my temporary adjustment period.
This will get much better as promised by the ones who traveled this journey before me. I have faith in that.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Dec 2006, 04:47 #32

There comes a time in every nicotine dependency recovery experience where we have to decide it is time to quit quitting and start looking ahead to living as a person finally free of their dependency.


If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Dec 2006, 20:18 #33

In closing Roger wrote:

Here is another a very good point to consider for those of you already working on a quit. If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Jan 2007, 07:45 #34

To Commemorate Roger's Fifth Gold.
Thanks Roger!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 07 Mar 2009, 17:45, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Feb 2007, 13:01 #35

From: Roger (Gold) (Original Message) Sent: 1/12/2003 1:54 AM
"There Is Nothing Either Good Or Bad, Hard Or Easy,
It's How We Choose To Think That Makes It So"
~William Shakespeare~
When you read the above quote, think about the first thought that came to your mind. Was it one that made a contradictive statement or one that opened up your mind for potential provocative thinking and acceptance of this universal law?
Throughout history it has been universally understood how we picture things that we like or dislike or how we perceive ourselves handling them, is most likely how they will turn out. Why do you suppose that is? Most experts would suggest we have already predetermined that within our subconscious mind by our fears and trepidations. By entering a preconceived thought in our subconscious, we unknowingly set the tone or program our subconscious as to how a particular task is handled by us. There are many things we cannot change the end result of. We can however control our actions and reactions, leading to a more pleasant or difficult result based on our attitude and perception as to how we handle the task.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Aug 2007, 19:42 #36

There comes a time in every nicotine dependency recovery experience where we have to decide it is time to quit quitting and start looking ahead to living as a person finally free of their dependency.


If you are struggling with physical or psychological withdrawal or having difficulties putting your quit and new life into the proper perspective, the art of practicing positive affirmations daily can help you to turn that around. As your attitude develops, you find comfort and develop more confidence in yourself, allowing you to believe, you will have the ability to remain quit and never take another puff.
"Change How You Think And You Can Change Your Life"
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Joined: 17 Jun 2006, 07:00

02 Sep 2007, 13:52 #37

You're not giving up nicotine, you're getting rid of it.......
Don't say good bye to nicotine but say good riddance to it instead ......
Think of nicotine cessation as an impossibly high mountain to climb......and it may well become one.
Use the incredible power of the human brain to give positive shape and form to your psychological reconditioning.
Think of it as a homecoming and a liberation and it will be just that.
Last edited by RobinS614 on 07 Mar 2009, 17:47, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Nov 2007, 13:26 #38

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing,
you're right."
"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."
"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking. "
"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal. "
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "
~Henry Ford~
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Jan 2008, 05:18 #39

Congratulatons on Six
&
thanks again Roger!
(so....was it the 31st or the 1st that you put down that honey dipping shovel? Good decision no doubt. )
YQb - Joe J
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 07 Mar 2009, 17:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Jun 2008, 13:25 #40

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing,
you're right."

"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."

"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
"

"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.
"

"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs.
"
Focus on Quitting for One hour at a time


All of the above phrases in black are quotes of
~Henry Ford~
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 02 May 2010, 15:51, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

29 Sep 2008, 07:29 #41

"Weather You Believe You Can Do A Particular Task, Or Weather You Believe You Can't, You Are Absolutely Right Either Way You Think"
~Henry Ford~
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "
Focus on Quitting for One hour at a time

Last edited by johnnynonic on 02 May 2010, 15:52, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Nov 2008, 05:55 #42

From above:

From: Joel. Sent: 1/12/2003 5:07 PM
Hello Roger:

I actually have an attitude quote I sometimes use in clinics. It is that if you quit with a lousy attitude you are pretty much assured to have a lousy time when first quitting.

If on the other hand you quit with a good attitude, well, you may still have a lousy time in the beginning, but at least you will have a good attitude about it.

As you may have guessed, this insight doesn't help a whole lot in the first few days. But it usually gets a chuckle. The more important advice on this issue is the string Acknowledge the negative--but dwell on the positive. Thanks for your sharing of insights here.

Joel
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Joined: 06 Aug 2009, 20:19

28 Aug 2009, 19:17 #43

Excellent reading for me today - thank you!
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

28 Aug 2009, 19:42 #44

"If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right."
"I can't quit" ... or ... "I won't quit"?

"One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises,
is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do."

"Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
"
"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal. "
"Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs. "


All of the above phrases in black are quotes of
~Henry Ford~
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Joined: 20 May 2009, 18:43

29 Aug 2009, 00:17 #45

I have read these links here before but I am so glad to see them again. Being an ex-smoker is such a wonderful journey privileged to read these sites and respond to them.
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