"Quitting Smoking": A Fate Worse than Death?

"Quitting Smoking": A Fate Worse than Death?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jan 2002, 03:27 #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library
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"Quitting Smoking"
A Fate Worse than Death?


People sitting in at smoking clinics are amazed at how resistant smokers are to giving up cigarettes. Even smokers will sit and listen to horror stories of other participants in sheer disbelief. Some smokers have had multiple heart attacks, circulatory conditions resulting in amputations, cancers, emphysema and a host of other disabling and deadly diseases. How in the world could these people have continued smoking after all that? Some of these smokers are fully aware that smoking is crippling and killing them, but continue to smoke anyway. A legitimate question asked by any sane smoker or nonsmoker is, "why?"

The answer to such a complex issue is really quite simple. The smoker often has cigarettes so tied into his lifestyle that he feels when he gives up smoking he will give up all activities associated with cigarettes. Considering these activities include almost everything he does from the time he awakes to the time he goes to sleep, life seems like it will not be worth living as an ex-smoker. The smoker is also afraid he will experience the painful withdrawal symptoms from not smoking as long as he deprives himself of cigarettes. Considering all this, quitting smoking creates a greater fear than dying from smoking.

If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes.

The smoker often feels that he needs a cigarette in order to get out of bed in the morning. Typically, when he awakes he feels a slight headache, tired, irritable, depressed and disoriented. He is under the belief that all people awake feeling this way. He is fortunate though, because he has a way to stop these horrible feelings. He smokes a cigarette or two. Then he begins waking up and feels human again. Once he is awake, he feels he needs cigarettes to give him energy to make it through the day. When he is under stress and nervous, the cigarettes calm him down. Giving up this wonder drug seems ludicrous to him.

But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Feb 2002, 22:40 #2

For those in the early days of their quits. What you feel like the first few days is what it is like to be a smoker in withdrawal, not what it feels like to be an ex-smoker. These two states are worlds apart. To stay in the ex-smoking world only requires remembering now to never take another puff!



Joel


12-23-2013 
Added following new video based on this article: 






Quitting smoking: A fate worse than death
Last edited by Joel on 23 Dec 2013, 14:45, edited 3 times in total.
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doowa66
Joined: 10 Jan 2009, 01:18

21 Jun 2002, 20:43 #3

WOW! I needed to read that this morning. I'm still in my first two weeks, and had a real bad day yesterday of craves, urges, whatever you wanna call them. It took all my willpower and energy to NOT pull into a gas station yesterday and buy a pack. But I didn't do it and I feel great this morning!Image

Joel seems to know exactly what I need to read in the morning.Image

laura
1 week 3 days 18 hours 45 minutes and 50 seconds....
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clactwicegold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

21 Jun 2002, 20:50 #4

Dear Joel,

How right you are about the feeling waking up. I think it must be my favourite thing about my quit. I can only aliken it to waking up as a child: Bright, refreshed and ready for my day! My nofagometer (as I call it) calculates how much time I've saved by quitting. Well, I could probably treble it if I take in to account my new morning routine.
Lurkers! He speaks the truth!!
Clac xxx
1 month, 2 weeks, 4 days, 21 hours, 57 minutes, 42 seconds tick tick tick....
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Jul 2002, 19:16 #5

We have many new members starting today. I only have a few minutes here this morning and wanted to bring up a few posts that addresses some of the key issues that some of them have raised. This is a key one for those who are still in the early stages of quitting and may be questioning whether the way they are feeling at the moment is worth it. Of course it is worth it, for the way you are feeling now is not the way you will be feeling for long. The way you feel when you are first quitting is not what it feels like to be an ex-smoker--it is just what it is like to be a smoker in the earliest stages of a quit. The first three days is what it is like to be an addict in drug withdrawal which has the potential of being a very miserable state. But even as bad as withdrawal may be when it is at its worst, it is nothing to the pain and suffering that a person could end up going through if he or she were to keep smoking and get any one thing wrong that smoking is fully capable of inducing. Again, I will bring up a few post addressing early stage quitting issues and hopefully will have a little more time later to address our newer members.

Joel
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Parker GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Jul 2002, 01:28 #6

I hope the New Folks and Lurkers tune in to this thread. The first week of quitting is not what it is going to feel like forever. Neither is the second week or third week. This is a process not just an event. It does get better. I only crave a cigarette 3 or 4 times a day now. The craves don't last long and are not the slightest bit painful. They cause me some slight and momentary mental discomfort. When I compare that to the daily agonizing (and I use that word deliberately-it is not an exaggeration) I did before quitting, it is nothing.

Yesterday, I went back and read some posts of 2 - 3 months ago. People who I perceived as pillars of strength when I first started sounded pretty shaky and confused back then. Image It does get better. Smoking doesn't. That just gets worse. After 32 years of sucking it in, I know that for a fact.

Best wishes all,
Parker (free and healing for 1 month and 11 and 1/2 days)
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Dec 2002, 23:32 #7

Elsewhere on the board today we are talking on how negativity often keeps people smoking and how working on the positive side of not smoking can help secure people's quits. Just thought I would bring up a few strings that highlight this issue.
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JulieA(bronze)
Joined: 10 Jan 2009, 01:18

28 Jan 2003, 06:46 #8

WOW! I am normal Thanks Joel

JulieA
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Feb 2003, 08:55 #9

For Alex:

Just reading or hearing the truth is no guarantee that a person is going to believe or continue to believe the truth. It's amazing what lengths people will go to continue to smoke and what losses will continue to mount--eventually resulting in the total loss of health and possibly even life all because some people will not accept the premise that to stay smoke free they must never take another puff!

Joel
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ComicForces GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

21 Mar 2003, 23:57 #10

I just wanted to say how great I think this thread is.

I think it really spells out what a GREAT decision ALL of us here at Freedom have made. All of the benefits of not smoking discussed here are completely true.

I think a lot of us have noticed we have much more time and energy to do things... Which is a HUGE plus.

I happen to be the happiest little camper because of turning green. I guess I couldn't resist sharing how great I think this thread is....

CF
1 month without a single puff.
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